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Discussion Starter #1
Does riding in the rain make your tires wear out quicker?
 

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No, it just feels like it.
 

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I've often wondered the same thing.

Are you positive about that, Oldguy?? ( I bet I'm older than you...)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I swear that my tires loose way more rubber in the rain than they do in dry conditions.
 

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I've often wondered the same thing.

Are you positive about that, Oldguy?? ( I bet I'm older than you...)
Wow, you weren't kidding. I'm like the old guy when I go riding with the ocmoto.com forum guys - although I joined beach city riders to go on a poker run ride, and hey I wasn't the old guy, lol! :D

I don't ride in the rain if I can help it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I only have a bike, so no i don't plan on not riding in the rain. I just wanted to know.
 

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Riding at night also makes your tires last longer due to lower road temps.
 

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tires last longer in the rain, water cools the rubber

you notice it more with agressive tread & soft rubber like a motard tire, I've worn out a motard tire on dry hot pavment in a weekend. around 1000-1200 miles, same tire, last me up to 3500 miles on wet or cold (below freezing) pavement
 

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Why would it?
Well, I once worked with people taking samples of pure natural rubber. We had to cut 2" steak-size samples out of 60 lb. blocks of rubber. You cannot cut into it when the knife is dry - it just doesn't cut at all. But if you keep the knife wet with water and it slices right in easily. The water acts as a lubricant.
I don't know whether tires wear faster in the wet or not. But I think it could be possible because of the way the water "lubricates" the surface.

I'm pretty sure punctures are more frequent on wet roads, based on my experiences & I think I read it somewhere.

Hey - I think I'll Google it.
 

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Well, I once worked with people taking samples of pure natural rubber. We had to cut 2" steak-size samples out of 60 lb. blocks of rubber. You cannot cut into it when the knife is dry - it just doesn't cut at all. But if you keep the knife wet with water and it slices right in easily. The water acts as a lubricant.
I don't know whether tires wear faster in the wet or not. But I think it could be possible because of the way the water "lubricates" the surface.

I'm pretty sure punctures are more frequent on wet roads, based on my experiences & I think I read it somewhere.

Hey - I think I'll Google it.
that's not a good comparison, wrap a tire warmer around it a while then hit it with a belt sander, then pour water on it and hit it with a belt sander
 

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Tires are far from pure, natural rubber. The compounds they use are much different. Silicon, carbon & other materials are used for longevity & traction.

Rain tires (in racing) literally fall apart when run outside of wet conditions. The compound is exceptionally soft to give additional grip on a wet surface. The water on the track cools them, which helps keep them from disintegrating.

Average street tires will be similar. Less traction & grip means lower friction & wear.
 

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Nobody really uses a sander on their tires, right?
I heard that in another thread where the guy with new tires lost traction. Or brake cleaner either?! :p
 

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Well, I once worked with people taking samples of pure natural rubber. We had to cut 2" steak-size samples out of 60 lb. blocks of rubber. You cannot cut into it when the knife is dry - it just doesn't cut at all. But if you keep the knife wet with water and it slices right in easily. The water acts as a lubricant.
I don't know whether tires wear faster in the wet or not. But I think it could be possible because of the way the water "lubricates" the surface.

I'm pretty sure punctures are more frequent on wet roads, based on my experiences & I think I read it somewhere.

Hey - I think I'll Google it.
Gee...cutting through rubber dry is harder than cutting through rubber with a wet blade...who would have thought it? ;D FYI-Cutting through metal works better with liquid cooling the cutting tool too.

Heat and friction is what wears down your tire when riding. Heat and friction is reduced when riding on wet pavement. Cutting through a tire with a knife and regular riding are not the same...not even the close to the same, you're comparing apples to the space shuttle.
 
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