Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In lieu of adjusting the chain would a racing chain adjuster work for the street? You know that arm with a spring and rollerball on the end. If so how much are they and where would I get one? The chain adjustment on our bike is just a pain in the a$$!!
Last night I went to adjust my chain slack, so I tightened it up a bit. Checked the slack after tightening the axle...too tight, back it off half the turn on the Allen screw...still too tight. Put it back to where it was initially and it was just right! What the hell, that was where it was in the first place! I guess I'm just sick of the chain adjustment being such a hit and miss type endeavor, there seems to be no logic to it what so ever.

Grav.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
Gotta be the mechanic

The adjusters work fine. You aren't trying to use the hash marks on the side plates, are you? Don't because they are not accurate and tend to slide a bit.

It sounds like your chain may have some wear in some spots. Before adjusting check a couple of areas for stretch. The owner's manual has a procedure, it's easy. If one area is stretched more than another it can do exactly what you described. You should adjust at the tightest area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Andy I've owned the bike now for almost 3yrs. and this is what I've noticed everytime I adjust the chain. I've used the hash marks as they are pretty acurate. After checking the chain it rotates directly in the center of the sprocket. As for the slack adjustment, do this for me on your next adjustment: Measure the chain slack after loosening the axle bolt and rear brake stay. Now tighten everything back to normal specs and re-measure the chain. Did the chain get tighter? It does me and it's always a hit and miss type thing. That is what is upsetting about adjusting the chain. Not that I can't adjust it properly, just takes longer than it should.

Grav.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
Nope, I never have had trouble. I did forget to mention that the torque arm for the rear caliper should be loosened. This lets the whole assembly follow the wheel. I never use the hash marks, I measure from the swingarm pivot to the center of the axle on both sides. I'm also careful when retightening to push down on the wrench, not along the axis of the bike. I'm also careful to loosen the adjusters a turn or two and I make sure that I am pulling with the adjusters. Neither one is slack when I retighten.

I've been adjusting chains on motorcycles for 42 years and have never had trouble getting them right, at most after two tries, mostly first shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
GraVitY said:
Measure the chain slack after loosening the axle bolt and rear brake stay.  Now tighten everything back to normal specs and re-measure the chain.  Did the chain get tighter?  It does me and it's always a hit and miss type thing.  That is what is upsetting about adjusting the chain.  Not that I can't adjust it properly, just takes longer than it should.

Grav.
I use the swingarm pivot-middle of axle bolt too, but my chain does tighten more once I get the axle nut on. I've learned to make the chain a little looser than I want so that when I tighten down the axle nut, it is just right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Stinky,

You are correct as that's what I do, however the problem is that it's always hit and miss. In other words you never really know how loose it must be for it to be just right. There are times that I think it's to loose before tightening but then hit the mark right on after tightening the axle. Then, there are times that I think it's on the tight side before tightening the axle only to find that it's also correct. It's just a pain in the butt.

Grav.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
GraVitY said:
It's just a pain in the butt.

Grav.
That's for sure. When I first started doing it, I even got as far as putting the cotter pin back in before checking the chain. I've learned NOT to do that anymore....
I wish it was as easy to change a rear tire as it is in pro racing.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top