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Discussion Starter #1
I've pretty much blown my mod budget for the year and will be doing the springs/oil/and a new rear shock for next year.

So I'm stuck with the stock suspension for this year. I weigh out right about 200lb in full gear. I adjusted the front preload all the way down and it took the dive I was getting on hard braking away and it feels pretty good. On the rear shock I'm at 5 out of 7 clicks I believe. 2 from max at least.

In your opinion should the back be harder or softer from there? Any help would be appreciated. Never messed with suspension at all on any previous bikes but I've been getting more aggresive in the twisties with the SV and am definately noticing things I never did before suspension wise.

Thanks for any help.
 

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Set the rear shock so that your sag is set correctly.

As for your mod budget, whats another $100 to get your springs/oil for the forks? ;)

**edit**
I just realized that you said "for suspension experts".
I really shouldnt have answered as Im not an expert, but I did stay at a holiday in express last night.
There are some people on this board who know about suspension and there are those that dont. Be wary of the responses you get.
 

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Yes, use the preload adjustment to set the sag. 30mm is good for the rear, and there should be info in the FAQ on the procedure.
On the front, if springs are out of the budget right now (and I reeeeaaally hope they're not ;D ) consider just doing fork oil. With the stock springs use 15w and set the level to 100mm.
 

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Yes, use the preload adjustment to set the sag. 30mm is good for the rear, and there should be info in the FAQ on the procedure.
On the front, if springs are out of the budget right now (and I reeeeaaally hope they're not ;D ) consider just doing fork oil. With the stock springs use 15w and set the level to 100mm.
This guy is an expert. You can trust his advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Rich, sag confuses the hell outa me but I'm sure once I do it right once I'll get it. Don't worry as soon as I squirrel away money for springs it will be for sonics, heard nothing but good things about them.

Maybe I can bribe Dack with pizza and beer for some help I'm only 30 mins away :)
 

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Thanks Rich, sag confuses the hell outa me but I'm sure once I do it right once I'll get it. Don't worry as soon as I squirrel away money for springs it will be for sonics, heard nothing but good things about them.

Maybe I can bribe Dack with pizza and beer for some help I'm only 30 mins away :)
Sag really is quite simple...

Sag is the amount the suspension 'play' essentially. From a measured point on the bike, Static sag is the amount the suspension 'droops' when fully unloaded; Dynamic sag is the amount the suspension compresses with you sitting on the bike.

Lets say, for instance, a point on the tail section is 914mm (about 36") above the ground with the bike upright. With the suspension fully decompressed (but tire still touching the ground) that same point on the tail is now 950mm above the ground (36mm difference). With you sitting on the bike (suspension compressed), that point drops down to 870mm above the ground (44mm difference). To obtain sag for this bike, you compute the average of the two difference in height (36mm and 44mm). This bike's rear sag would be 40mm.
 

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Sag really is quite simple...

Sag is the amount the suspension 'play' essentially. From a measured point on the bike, Static sag is the amount the suspension 'droops' when fully unloaded; Dynamic sag is the amount the suspension compresses with you sitting on the bike.

Lets say, for instance, a point on the tail section is 914mm (about 36") above the ground with the bike upright. With the suspension fully decompressed (but tire still touching the ground) that same point on the tail is now 950mm above the ground (36mm difference). With you sitting on the bike (suspension compressed), that point drops down to 870mm above the ground (44mm difference). To obtain sag for this bike, you compute the average of the two difference in height (36mm and 44mm). This bike's rear sag would be 40mm.
Um, no. :) You're averaging static sag with the difference between static and total sag, which isn't a useful number. I typically just work with total sag to start with, and most of the time that's all you really need to worry about.

It's easier to use the rear axle as the reference rather than the ground, especially when getting the fully extended number
 

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Lets say, for instance, a point on the tail section is 914mm (about 36") above the ground with the bike upright. With the suspension fully decompressed (but tire still touching the ground) that same point on the tail is now 950mm above the ground (36mm difference). With you sitting on the bike (suspension compressed), that point drops down to 870mm above the ground (44mm difference). To obtain sag for this bike, you compute the average of the two difference in height (36mm and 44mm). This bike's rear sag would be 40mm.
nope, in your case sag would be 80mm.
 

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There are some people on this board who know about suspension. . .
Yes, use the preload adjustment to set the sag. 30mm is good for the rear, and there should be info in the FAQ on the procedure.
On the front, if springs are out of the budget right now (and I reeeeaaally hope they're not ;D ) consider just doing fork oil. With the stock springs use 15w and set the level to 100mm.
. . .and there are those that dont. Be wary of the responses you get.
you cant get any cheaper than my forks. i cut 3 coils off each spring. ground them flat. put 20 wt oil in.
Funny how well that worked out. ;)
 

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Um, no. :) You're averaging static sag with the difference between static and total sag, which isn't a useful number. I typically just work with total sag to start with, and most of the time that's all you really need to worry about.

It's easier to use the rear axle as the reference rather than the ground, especially when getting the fully extended number
Dee de dee, I always go one step too far.
 
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