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I typically use soft ties opposed to Canyon Dancers. Additionally, I have become a fan of ratchet straps with the larger handles (get some with a weight rating that is strong enough).

Soft ties around the lower tripe tree and two straps up front. For longer trips, two on the rear subframe or passenger rearsets. Done right, it aint going anywhere.
 

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what I've done in the past:

Go to your local motorcycle shop, specifically the service area. Ask if they have any extra straps from shipping bikes. Maybe you'll get them free like I did, maybe you'll pay $10, best to have a few dollars to encourage them.

If that doesn't work, go get some ratchet straps from Walmart. They're like $20 for four straps.

When strapping the bike down:
a: Figure out how the ratchet straps work before you need them.
b: Enlist help, have someone sit on the bike straight up. One strap on each side of the front, you don't need the canyon dancers, but they don't hurt.
c: For extra care the back can be strapped down on each side, use the passenger pegs. However, one strap all the way through the wheel, one side to the other usually works.
d: Put your bike in gear, and leave the kickstand down even though the bike will be upright.
 

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The WalMart stuff sucks.

It takes very little to exert the force necessary for them to break and it's happened to me and I was just lucky that I didn't lose a utility ATV worth over $8k on the highway. The freeways are littered with pieces and parts of crappy tiedowns.

Get the Canyon Dancer and some Ancra tie-downs. The Ancra Integra's might allow you to eliminate the Canyon Dancer as they have a loop section that goes around bars without hooking the S hook to any bike parts that might scratch. They've been the industry standard for years and years and they run $24 a pair at CycleGear. You local dealer should have them, too.

I would suspect your trailer might be an issue. It seems the enclosed trailers never have suitable places to attach anything to. Hopefully that's not the case with yours.
 

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Only thing I can add:

Get a harbor freight wheel chock, mount it to the floor of the trailer, or to a board and put that in the trailer.
 

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Is the wheel chock really necessary? I plan to trailer my bikes soon, and I hadn't considered getting a wheel chock. Just using the canyon dancers and butting the front wheels against the trailer wall.
 

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Is the wheel chock really necessary? I plan to trailer my bikes soon, and I hadn't considered getting a wheel chock. Just using the canyon dancers and butting the front wheels against the trailer wall.
No, but it helps if you have to do any loading/unloading by yourself.
 

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Is the wheel chock really necessary? I plan to trailer my bikes soon, and I hadn't considered getting a wheel chock. Just using the canyon dancers and butting the front wheels against the trailer wall.
I've done at least 5000 or so miles with a bike in the back of an open pickup with just 2 ratchet straps, a chock is nice but not necessary.
 

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I've done at least 5000 or so miles with a bike in the back of an open pickup with just 2 ratchet straps, a chock is nice but not necessary.
I agree. In the back of a pick-up. Inside an enclosed trailer is a little different story though, since (in most enclosed trailers) you can't push the front tire right up against the bulkhead, you need to hold the front of the bike in place somehow. Also with the floors generally being wood, a chock helps keep the tire from sliding around should conditions become sloppy.
 

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I agree. In the back of a pick-up. Inside an enclosed trailer is a little different story though, since (in most enclosed trailers) you can't push the front tire right up against the bulkhead, you need to hold the front of the bike in place somehow. Also with the floors generally being wood, a chock helps keep the tire from sliding around should conditions become sloppy.

1100 mi or so in a Penske truck as well (had ridden down to GA last year, had to trailer back to make it the whole way in a day after having my plans change). I strapped it in the exact same way, with two straps off of the front end and was able to butt the wheel up against the front wall. I didn't think about the wood floor making a difference in friction...
 

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I've done lots of things hauling stuuf (and managed to make it through) that I wouldn't do now, or recommend to others, knowing what I know now about rigging and securing loads, especially in a dynamic environment.
 

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I've done lots of things hauling stuuf (and managed to make it through) that I wouldn't do now, or recommend to others, knowing what I know now about rigging and securing loads, especially in a dynamic environment.
This says an awful lot.

Most of us throw something in the back of a truck or on a trailer, and strap it down, give it a nudge and call it good.

I'm curious to know what yer offical learning has taught you. Not everything, but specifically, securing a load in a dynamic environment.
 

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I'm curious to know what yer offical learning has taught you. Not everything, but specifically, securing a load in a dynamic environment.
There's really an awful lot to it for putting in a post at 3:56 in the afternoon ;) but if you'd like to swing by for some discussion, you may be able to catch me before I head out. I won't be in tomorow. ;D
 

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I used the canyon dancer style on front with wheel against wall and two rachet straps on passenger rear sets.

If you preload front and rear springs with strap tension, it won't go anywhere. Bike should be in center of trailer so straps are equidistant.
 

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I don't think having the kickstand down would be a good idea. You want the bike to use the bike suspension..having it hit the kickstand would only result in a damaged bike or trailer floor. Straps should be tighten to ensure that the bike is firm, but can still use some suspension travel. I plan on using two ratchet straps at the front, to pull the front down, two more up front running from side to side, two more at the rear. So, total of at least six straps. Also, ensure that the bike will not "roll"..wheel chock is an excellent device for this and also leave in 1st gear. Some ratch straps have safety hooks..they have a clip that prevents the hook form coming off even if the strap gets slack. Good idea for the front pull-down straps since they will slack when the bike suspension travel occurs.
 

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i'd go with some ratchet straps, make sure they are not cheapy woven plastic fiber ones though. on some bikes you go sneak under the fairing and go to the bars or triple tree. i want to say that when i loaded up my SV we went to the frame somewhere. and then around the passenger pegs.
 

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I have a Canyon Dancer, and it's alright, but I commonly have issues with the grips moving in, and causing throttle stick. It will hold the bike where it needs to be, but remember to check the grips after you trailer the bike.

I've seen the wheel chock from Harbor Frieght, and I will vouche for it being a VERY nice peice of equipment. It's on my "things to buy" list. It's just that good.

and invest in good straps. $20 straps will cause $200 in damage when they fail.
 

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and invest in good straps. $20 straps will cause $200 in damage when they fail.
+1. I use smaller straps (can't remember the manufacturer, but I got them at a bike shop and they're sturdy) around the lower triple with ratchet straps (yes, fairly expensive ones as ratchet straps go, definitely not walmart specials) secured to 1/2 inch eye bolts through the 3/4 inch deck of the trailer with double nuts and large washers on the bottom side of the deck.

I have, in the past, used the cheap straps from wally world, they were very smooth on the surface and they held well sitting still but failed while under the added load of being in motion. They straps didn't part, but they didn't hold, probably because the material was too smooth and they slipped in the ratchet mechanism. At a gas stop I opened up the trailer to check on things and found one of the bikes laying over on the one with the good straps.
 
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