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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long story short, I had an on-road repair that I had to do (shifter bolt came out and had to ghetto rig it back in).

Anyways the repair took me about 30 mins and I left the ignition on accidentally. So the battery went flat. The bike didn't have enough juice to start. However, some nice folks on harleys came by and gave me a good push start and I rode it back ~20 miles @60-70mph to get home. Ran fine (but the EFI light was on but now after turning the bike off and on the light is out now).

Anyways, I think my battery is just not up to the task this year, I did the math and the battery SHOULD be able to handle the headlight being on for 30 minutes or so. I let it discharge this winter (yes I am stupid, to be fair it was stored climate controlled) and charged it up this spring. But I think I may have killed it leaving it out. SO I feel like I need to replace. Doing research, I've read that some people said riding your bike with a nearly flat battery will kill the R/R. So is my R/R toast now? :( It obviously charged the battery some because after getting home I was able to turn it off and then start it back up again under its own battery power.

Either way I am going to get a new battery but need to know if I need to plan for an R/R replacement, too.
 

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... I've read that some people said riding your bike with a nearly flat battery will kill the R/R. ....
I don;t see what mechanism would cause that - if anything higher load on the R/R actually makes it work less (higher output current means less shunt current)

Use this diagnostic guide to check out your charging system

http://eviltwinsbk.com/forumz/index.php?topic=276.0

That CBR FH008 is a good choice of R/R for the SV - a definite upgrade from stock.

Oh - definitely get a new battery; spend a little extra on a good one.
 

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I don;t see what mechanism would cause that - if anything higher load on the R/R actually makes it work less (higher output current means less shunt current)
In the automotive world, weak or dead batteries will cause alternaters to overload and fail. The best advice is to keep your battery in good shape. I would think this would apply to charging systems on bikes too. Why would a weak battery result in less load?
 

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In the automotive world ...
But we're talking about bike systems are we not?
Motorcycle regulators (until recently with the advent of the MOSFET R/R systems from Shindengen on recent models) are extremely crude devices: as stated, they work by 'shunting' current direct to ground; when the load is greater on the output, the shunt function is lesser.

Why would a weak battery result in less load?
I didn't say that
Read again:

... if anything higher load on the R/R actually makes it work less (higher output current means less shunt current)...
The example quoted suggested low battery - which will draw higher charging current; this will actually make the Regulator work less.
Quite similarly, a motorcycle shunt regulator will run cooler - less taxing, lower shunt current - when running with full load of lights, accessories etc., than if you turned all the loads off.

An automotive regulator is a series regulator- excess power is dissipated directly in the the regulation device. i.e. higher current is more taxing for the series regulator. (However the series regulator is more efficent and offers better regulation)
 

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It seems unlikely that an OEM battery form 07 could be dead already. I think mine lasted 4-5 years. Certainly don't worry about having hurt the r/r; t's fine. I guess if you take lots of short trips, the battery could be on its way out but really, i'd just charge the thing and keep using it for a few more years.
 

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I don't think you need a new battery or a RR

you bike battery is not a 100 amp car battery, leaving the ignition on for ½ hour could easily drain 50% of the juice in the battery leaving it incapable of turningthe bikes starter

if the battery was dead, you wouldn't have even been able to push start the bike, it had enuf juice to run the fuel pump and ignition or it wouldn't have started
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well the reason I am concerned is that I left the battery in the bike all winter and it discharged pretty far and I had to charge it up this spring... From what I've read that can easily kill or hurt a battery pretty bad. I guess I'm a nub so I could be way off base.

I don't own a bike trailer or anything so the new battery would be more peace of mind... I just don't want to get stuck somewhere with a bike that won't start and have to call for a commercial tow.

I guess regardless of it all I got a new battery last night anyway, it couldn't hurt to put a new one in, right?

I'll probably toss the old OEM battery on my tender that I picked up and maybe use it as a spare or something.
 

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Well the reason I am concerned is that I left the battery in the bike all winter and it discharged pretty far and I had to charge it up this spring... From what I've read that can easily kill or hurt a battery pretty bad. I guess I'm a nub so I could be way off base.

I don't own a bike trailer or anything so the new battery would be more peace of mind... I just don't want to get stuck somewhere with a bike that won't start and have to call for a commercial tow.

I guess regardless of it all I got a new battery last night anyway, it couldn't hurt to put a new one in, right?

I'll probably toss the old OEM battery on my tender that I picked up and maybe use it as a spare or something.
A good OEM battery can withstand several complete discharges over 5 years. When it goes, it goes slowly, ie, you'll not ride it for a week or so and notice that it is a little harder to start then normal. You just need to keep an eye on his gradual deterioration... and not panic.
The only "harm" replacing the battery could do is if you replace it with some junky battery which can seem fine at first then short out or otherwise just die over the next year or two. The "OLD" OEM battery might outlast a "new" POS battery.
 

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When you recharged the battery after the winter, how did you recharge it? If you overcharged it, either too long or too much power at once you could easily kill it. Do you have a battery tender?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When you recharged the battery after the winter, how did you recharge it? If you overcharged it, either too long or too much power at once you could easily kill it. Do you have a battery tender?
I recharged it with a diehard auto battery charger on 2amp mode.
 

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.. Looks like your post includes an upgrade for the SV.
Yes, the newer MOSFET R/R are very much a recommended upgrade.
For the SV, I would suggest the FH008 model off CBR600 or up to 07 CBR1000 You will need to swap the connector plugs to match the SV harness - I recommend connecting the output directly to the battery (per the reference thread).
The different model year CBR600's & 1000 essentially use the same FH008 R/R but the connectors are different
The FH010 (Kawaski ZX10/14) and FH012 (Various Yamaha) are better - a little bigger than the 008 physically and you will need special connector plugs for them (or can use spade terminals).
I run the 008 on my SV and 012's on my TL and Triumph.
FH014 from 08+ CBR1000 is similar to the 012 but uses different connectors all together (no known source for those other than off a CBR full harness)
 
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