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Discussion Starter #1
First, let me state that I'm a first time poster to the board. Love the site. There is a lot of great info here. I'm in Iraq in the middle of a one year tour and can't wait to get back home and start riding again.

I love the SV. I wanted one the first time I looked at one. I haven't had a bike in 13 years. My one and only bike was a 500cc Katana. that I owned for two years. I hated that bike. It was very uncomfortable to say the least.

I really wanted to buy a new SV650 when I got back home. But after lurking around this board for awhile I began to wonder if a brand new SV is the best way to go about getting back into riding. Maybe I should go used? Maybe I should go with something smaller?

I'm 6' and 175lbs and have fairly long arms and legs. I'm not overly confident about my riding abilities right now because I haven't ridden in so long. I want something that I can make a 10 to 20 mile commute on in relative comfort and something that is going to work well in city traffic. And I'm not into the cruiser look. Preffer a standard style bike.

I was looking at used Buell Blasts but they look really small. Only sat on one once and I don't remember how it fit.

So I guess my main question is what should I look for if I decide to go used and what can I expect to pay. I live in the wichita, ks area by the way.

Sorry for such a long first post and thanks for the help.
 

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coach-- Welcome to the site.

The SV can be a good first/reentry bike, although conventional wisdom points to a used bike in the 250/500 class. The SV was my first bike (at age 29) and I made it without killing myself or the bike, although the first few months were eye-opening... :shock:


I wouldn't recommend the SV as a starter/reentry bike for everyone, too much depends on the person and their confidence and decision making skills.


Good luck!


p.s. Thanks for serving... 8)
 

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It's generally agreed that the Suzuki GS500, Kawasaki Ninja 250 and 500 make good starter bikes and can usually be found used for not a lot of cash. Take the MSF course(s), ride for a couple seasons, work on your skills, then treat yourself to a shiney new SV650.

Walker
 

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My new list of good easy to ride yada yada yada bikes include

The Triumph Bonneville




or this



:D :D
 

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Since you're returning to riding, you might also consider getting your SV, but taking the MSF course as a refresher first. That way you can get your software upgraded, and make all the dumb mistakes on someone else's bike.

Welcome to the board!

Bill
 

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Coach,

I took a 19-year leave from riding myself. Last year I bought a Kawasaki Vulcan 500, took an MSF course (very good refresher training), and put 5000 miles on it before selling it and buying my 2000 SV650. My impression is that the SV650 is a fine restart bike if you take it slowly and spend some time getting to know it.

I'm also in Wichita (Derby actually) and commute to work at the Cessna Pawnee facility about 13 miles each way. I absolutely love my SV and think it's perfect for the commute. I bought it locally, in excellent condition with 4,300 miles on it for $3,150. There was a 2001 SV650 in the paper at the same time advertised for $3,400, but it sold quickly.

If you'd like to give me a buzz when you get home, feel free. Take care and stay safe in Iraq.
 
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I, myself, have a Buell Blast. It was my first bike. I have been riding it for about two years now. It was a great bike to learn on. And it has just the right amount of balance between a sportbike and a beginners bike. I would recomend the Buell except for the fact that it is a "Harley" product. It is a great bike but Harley isnt know for their customer service. Other than that, I have had no complaints. Im 5'8" and the bike fits me fine, my dad is 6'2" and he still enjoys riding it around.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey Derbyblue

Good to hear that there is a local guy on the board other than me. I'm a teacher and coach at Circle High School. Used to have a couple of friends on the staff at Derby.

Sounds like used SV's are not as hard to find as I thought they would be and the price seems right. I might go the SV route after all. Just have to see what's available after I get home.

Thanks for the post.
 

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I usually say not, for a first bike.Get the retraining done first! If you are a retread rider,a used sv might be ok. Look for a Naked one,not as expensive to buy or heven forbid,repair :D You can have a ball,on a SV.and never use more than 1/2 throttle :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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First, Thank You for your service.

Second, I'll be another one to say my SV was my reintro bike after 15 years without riding. I'm still alive, but only because I developed an overactive sense of my own mortality over those years. Back in my twenties I was a pure squid except for my wearing a helmet. Since then I ended up with a mortgage, a wife, a kid, a career, several friends funerals and a heart attack.

All those things together slowed me down enough to feel comfortable starting over on the SV. Plus the knowledge that talking the wife into one bike was hard enough. Buying a bike, then turning around the following season and upgrading would have never gotten SWMBO's blessing. :wink:

I'll echo what everyone has said. Soon as you get back, go take the MSF. If you get any squidly urges, stay away from the SV until you grow out of them. If you find you have a healthy respect for the bike and the road, go for it, you'll grow into the bike.
 

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I did almost exactly what you want to do, only i had only been away from riding for a about 2 years. ( ok so that isn't anywhere near close, but i did buy my shiny new sv with OIF deployment money......Thank you Saddam :p )
Not sure what branch you are in but some posts offer the beginner rider course for free, not here unfortuanately, but i have heard others mention it. After that, with a bit of caution and plenty of parking lot practice there isn't any reason you shouldn't be good to go. If you choose not to take the brc, at least simply ask someone who has to ride with you to a parking lot and run you through the drills, swerving, stopping in a turn, emergency braking are life savers and learning the box comes in awful handy sometimes.

If you are in the army, i believe it is armywide policy, might just be 18th core, that in order to ride at all you must first pass the MSF experienced rider course, this quite obviously goes completely against common sence, but there it is. I passed it after taking the msf brc 1 month previous, with only 50 some odd miles on my shiny new SV. (i must add that the wide upright bars are very nice for this sort of thing). Others who hadn't taken the brc had issues :shock: fairing scratching, lever bending, ego busting issues :( Just something to consider.
 

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First I'll say that I hope you have a safe tour in Iraq and make it back in good health.

From my novice rider perspective...I think a used SV would be an excellent choice if you had good basic command of the Katana.

I think the SV is a bad choice if you have zero experience operating a motorcycle, even worse if shifting your own gears with a clutch is a new concept.

If you are truly competent at basic motorcycling on any type of motorcycle you should be fine on the SV - if you go about it in a safe & sane manner. Before getting on any new bike, I would consider taking the MSF course and reading up on some of the 'classics'. Track days have also been a major part of what's gotten me as far as I've made it in the ~14 months I've been riding.

If you can get books sent to you while you're away, I'd consider reading "proficient motorcycling" by David Hough.

I'd buy used, you can find a great SV in the 3-4k range used, for 4k-4.5k you can find one that is functionally 'new'.

The nice thing about the SV is that once you get over the sensitive throttle + torque, mushy forks + strong brakes, the bike is overall very forgivable. You can make a lot of mistakes on the bike that would lead to major problems on other bikes. I think you can grow a lot on the SV as a new(er) rider, (based on my personal experience) in contrast to more agressive supersport type bikes.

Good luck!
 

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ancosta said it very well.

I recommend a first gen naked - they're cheap enough to pass on the comprehensive insurance coverage.
 

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i looked at everything when i was shopping for my first bike. and i got my sv. :lol: :lol: and yes it has been eye-opening :shock: but im glad i did it. cause i will have the bike for a very long time.

and welcome to the club...
 

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My suggestion is that given the time it's been since you've ridden, and the reative little experience it was, you should consider yourself a new rider.

I never recommend new bikes for new riders. You're going to drop it, mabye have some low sides re-learning to ride in the rain, not to mention you won't remember the million + small things that go into maintaining a bike.

So, for very little money, well under 3k, you can find plenty of good, reliable, relatively low milage Honda Knighthawks out there. Find something post 92. After keeping that for a year or two, you can then look at something like a Honda 919 or Suzuki Bandit. It sounds like a sporty standard would suit your needs well.

Whatever you do, start with a used bike or you'll be throwing away money.
If you are bent on buying something you will be keeping right off the bat, a naked SV650 is a good recommendation.
 
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