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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to refinish my fender that was half-ass rattle canned by the previous owner. Looks like he didn't even bother to scuff the previous finish before painting. Thus, the paint chipping and peeling off in many spots (black over yellow, nice...). It is also quite un-even, like he tried to re-do it a couple times.

So, the other night, I started trying to sand down the black to make a nice surface to start with primer. It seems as if the black doesn't really want to sand off though. Its wearing down in some spots, peeling off in others, and grinding all the way to bare plastic in other spots. Generally just leaving a non-smooth finish. I've read that it is not desireable to sand down into the bare plastic, so that is when I got concerned.

After about an hour of working on it. I stopped and thought about stripping the paint off totally. I had some strip-ease in the garage, but read through it and found it was really just designed for stripping wood metal, or masonry. Not plastic.

Anyone have any suggestions to help me get rid of this guys rattle can job without ruining my fender?
 

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yeah, i was going to advise against chemical strippers- glad you noticed that before you did it.

perhaps try a palm sander?
If I came to a point of desperation, I'd consider trying a media blaster. I'd try out using walnut shells but Im curious as to what finish actual sand or glass-bead would leave. At least you know that if you were to sand/glass-blast it then you'd have a consistant finish throughout.
 

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No easy way to strip plastic. Regular stripper will soften it, as will paint thinner.

Personally I would just sand it off with 220 wet (lots of water - not pushing too hard) to remove the spray paint, then go to 320 wet, then prime and sand with 400 wet before painting.

Post a photo if you can.


Jay
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I found out about a product called Bulldog Flexible Bumper Stripper. Its designed for car bumpers (urethane usually). Supposedly it works well on ABS plastic too. I will try a little more sanding, but if that doesn't seem to work, I will go get some of the Bulldog stuff.
 

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I found out about a product called Bulldog Flexible Bumper Stripper. Its designed for car bumpers (urethane usually). Supposedly it works well on ABS plastic too. I will try a little more sanding, but if that doesn't seem to work, I will go get some of the Bulldog stuff.
The problem is it may strip the factory paint as well, which there is no need to do.

You will have better results working over the original finish if possible.


Jay
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The problem is it may strip the factory paint as well, which there is no need to do.

You will have better results working over the original finish if possible.


Jay
Jay, I'm pretty sure the yellow underneath is not the original factory finish anyway. The fender (and my whole GSXR front end) has quite a history. It came off of Chris Baker's SV/MV project.
http://www.sv650.org/mvsv/mv-sv.htm
Somewhere along the line, Chris decided to upgraded to a newer GSXR front end and sold the entire front end to the previous owner of my SV. My previous owner painted over the yellow with black and unfortunately, he was not as detail oriented as Chris was. Hence the peeling/chipping paint that I'm now dealing with.
 

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If that is the case (multiple layers) you may have to go the chemical stripper route.

I would test any stripper you decide to go with on a small non-visible area first to be safe.


Jay
 

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sand, prime, sand, prime, sand, then finally paint. doesnt have to be down to bare plastic. just get a nice even painting surface. makes sure no distinct lines bvetween the original color and the sprayed on color. use progressively finer grits and lots of water.
 

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Sand off the majority and prime / paint (in proper procedure or course)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
sand, prime, sand, prime, sand, then finally paint. doesnt have to be down to bare plastic. just get a nice even painting surface. makes sure no distinct lines bvetween the original color and the sprayed on color. use progressively finer grits and lots of water.
You and nudist aren't reading. The problem is, the more I sand, the more chips. The black is on very thick, and it is rubbery, it doesn't sand well. Thus, it is not coming off evenly. Where is it chipped, the lower yellow finish is coming off quickly and down to bare plastic. I just want an even surface, but sanding isn't working well due to the multiple layers of different quality paints.
 

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If it has been repainted it will give you a TON of trouble if you don't remove all of it before painting.

Absolutely strip all the paint that isn't factory before you continue if you expect it to look good when you are done.


Jay

EDIT: Also, is there another color under the yellow? If not, that could be (should be) the original factory paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Jay

EDIT: Also, is there another color under the yellow? If not, that could be (should be) the original factory paint.
Hard to tell. I think it was black before it was yellow. It seems as though the black may have been stripped before the yellow was applied. Either that, or the sub-black layer is much thinner than the top black layer.

Anyway, I'm going to get some bumper stripper tomorrow at lunch. I found a place that sells it near me.

I will follow up after use.
 

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The thin black layer is most likely a primer under the yellow. You could check to see if yellow was available that year also.

Shoot a photo.


Jay
 

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Eastwood Company has a product called DeKote that I've used on fiberglass without any damage to the saddlebags (1980's style harley bags). It's supposed to be safe for SMC panels as well. It is a VERY weak stripper though, it took almost a quart and a lot of playing with a plastic scraper over about 4 hours to clean off one bag. It looked like two coats of different color paints and one of primer.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The thin black layer is most likely a primer under the yellow. You could check to see if yellow was available that year also.

Shoot a photo.


Jay
Did you see the link to Chris Bakers project? The yellow was definitely not original. He had a black fender on a blue bike, then he painted the whole thing yellow.
 

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You and nudist aren't reading. The problem is, the more I sand, the more chips. The black is on very thick, and it is rubbery, it doesn't sand well. Thus, it is not coming off evenly. Where is it chipped, the lower yellow finish is coming off quickly and down to bare plastic. I just want an even surface, but sanding isn't working well due to the multiple layers of different quality paints.
Well perhaps its the type/grit of paper or other prep material.... Have you tried a lacquer thinner to see if the extra layer comes off with that?
 
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