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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay. A couple of weeks ago I posted up about how to paint my fender and hugger.

I bought a Krylon spray paint, which was supposed to bond well to plastic so over the silver colored plastic fender and hugger it went.

I painted them black and put down several coats of clear coat over the black.

To be honest, I really like the way it sets off against the silver of the bike so I'm pleasantly surprised at my phenomenal artistic spirit (yeah, I'll shut up about that now).

Problem. when I was putting the pieces back down and was screwing them in they scratched incredibly easily.

What, if anything did I do wrong? How can I protect the paint so it doesn't look like crap after the usual road hazards kick up???

Thanks.



PS- I'll post pics up this afternoon or evening so you see what I mean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Prep??

I cleaned it real well. Yup, that's about it. I asked at my local ACE Hardware store and they said that it shouldn't be a problem.

I was thinking that it could be a problem, but eased my mind when they told me that it was going to be okay.



So. Now that I'm thinking that I SHOULD prep the stuff. What do I do now?

How do I prep the surface of the plastic for painting when it has the silver coat on there? Is there a way to remove the coat?? Is there a way to work with it on there?
 

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When you say it's scratching... Is it going clear through to the paint, or is it the clear that's marking? And is it literally scratching, or is it chipping at the edges?

What sort of clear did you use? I did a mudguard with cheapy acrylic clear a while back and it basically seemed never to harden properly- it wasn't supposed to beed baked, but it gave the impression that it did. I've just done a bunch of panels with 1K clear and that's a very different story. (I, ahem, tested it by dropping my seat hump...)

One thing I did notice is that the clear I'm using needs to be applied very differently from paint. Paint you do several thin coats. This clearcoat works best when sprayed on very heavy from very short range. When applied like paint it goes on almost powdery, as if it's partly dry before it hits, and while it does work it needs a load of finishing. Sprayed at close range on a narrow fan, it goes on thick and smooth and only needs rubbing compound, no wet and dry. Try that with paint and it'd be run city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmmm.

Okay. By scratching I mean that it's going right through the clear and black paint that I painted on. It's going down to the original silver plastic color as if the hard work my index finger slaved over was nothing. I took a good look at it after an 80 mile 80 - 90mph trek today, but found no chipping or cracking at the edges at all.

I sprayed the clear coat on as the instructions said-- about 12 in. away. It looked like it was barely making it to the paint, but I put on several coats.

Oh yeah, the spray paint that I used was called Krylon-- both the black and the clear. Both of them stated, on the bottles, that they were especially good to use on plastic as it had special bonding properties.

The stuff is supposed to be good, but I'm having my doubts.




I don't know if waxing several coats on will make a difference, but I'm thinking of giving that a try next.
 

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A paint job is only as good as the surface preperation. The surfaces should have been at least scuffed up or sanded then cleaned with a pre painting solvent that removes all grease and waxes. Even your fingerprints have enough oil to ruin a paint job. I suggest stripping off all of the clear and black, totally sand the silver as to create a surface that the new paint can bond to. Clean the to be painted surface with a wax/grease remover (check with a local automotive paint supplier for proper cleaner) DO NOT TOUCH THE CLEAN SURFACE WITH BARE HANDS! then have at her with the paint and clear coat. Let them dry at least as long as recomended...be patient grasshopper. You will be pleased with the results. Good Luck.
 

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If you're talking about Krylon fusion, it's crap. Actually the only Krylon product I ever liked is there high heat paint...

You need to wet sand the surface before you paint it. 400 wet/dry paper, use it wet... lots of water... Rustoleum makes great paint but there enamels tend to crack when applied to flexible surfaces. There laquers are decent but will run if you spill gas on it. As with any laquer many light coats are best.
 

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donniej said:
If you're talking about Krylon fusion, it's crap.  Actually the only Krylon product I ever liked is there high heat paint...
^ DONNIEJ SPEAKS THE TRUTH!!!!!!!!!11111!!!!!!!!!!!

Seriously, I painted my dirtbike with the kyrlon fusion (specefically for plastic, bonds better supposably), I prepped it properly etc etc, its crap. Scratches very easy then flakes off. When it comes to painting things I use mostly dupli-color products, they have proven worthy as my rims are painted with that, and the only chipping is from my lowside, thats it. Even that is minor.

This might be a dumb question...but how long did you let it dry? Most rattle can paints can be handled within an hour, but handled does not mean its dry! Just something to think about it.
 

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did you use a primer first? I found if you want a strong nice hard finish on something buy a can of black primer like rustoleum or something and then spray clearcoat over it after it is dry. Looks like a gloss black paint job and the primer goes on much easier than a standard paint.

Also, you shouldn't expect the paint to be hard as the factory stuff unless you baked it one under heat lamps or something. Just spraying with a can of spray never yields top notch results. Heat lamps are a poor mans way of baking the paint on so that it is much more durable than just air drying. Be careful not to burn it though because they get HOT.
 

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the krylon stuff is supposed to be applied to plastic. not the smooth painted finish on top of plastic. i used some semi gloss black on my front fender and all i did was lightly sand the whole thing so that it would have something to bite into. so far it has worked great for me. but i did not use any clear so i can't vouch for that stuff.

it sounds like the other guys here have had bad experiences with the krylon. if i was using it to get a really nice finish on a fairing or something i may have a different story for you. but my application was ok.
 

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schultzboy said:
it sounds like the other guys here have had bad experiences with the krylon. if i was using it to get a really nice finish on a fairing or something i may have a different story for you. but my application was ok.
I havent really had problems with all Krylon, just the fusion stuff. It was applied to bare plastic, that was roughed up and cleaned so I believe the application was correct. How long did ya let it dry? I remember reading on another board that some people let the stuff dry for a full week before handling and they had much better results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Granted, I'm going to wind up redoing the fender and hugger, but here's how it looks.

Of course, that's if I got it right.

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Oh. A couple of things. Firstly, thanks all for the replies. I've got more work to do.

Regarding the Krylon-- I let it sit for a few hours before I even touched it. Wound up getting into a bottle of wine with an ex-girlfriend while it was drying. Crap! That was a boo-boo.

Nope. Didn't use primer, didn't know to prep (or even how to prep) properly, and the ACE guys I spoke to said that I could just go ahead.

What I'm going to do one of these weekends is strip off the clear and black, sand down and prep the fender and hugger properly, redo this, put on a couple of wax coats, and see what I come up with.


... and yes, I put a LOT of reflective tape all over my helmet. It may look icky, but it's gotten me noticed.
 

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I think we're off on a bit of a wrong 'un here... Krylon might be rubbish, and the prep work might have been lacking, but neither of those things should cause the top coat to scratch so easily. Bad paint or bad prep would usually cause it to chip easily, or delaminate. It shouldn't allow scratching in this way (unless it's ridiculously thick and vey soft, where it would allow the top coat to dent). But easy scratches has to be a failing of the clear coat or the clear coat application. It sounds like it's either not hardened enough or it's too thin. If the top coat weren't sticking properly due to bad prep between apaint and clear, then yes it'd scratch easy, but it'd also probably show other damage- chips, possibly flaking at the edges- which he doesn't have.

What clearcoat was it you used? The same manufacturer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Interesting.

Yeah, it was a clear coat by Krylon, the same manufacturer as the paint. I think it was probably too thin of a couple of coats as while I was spraying it I noticed that it looked like was barely reaching the surface. However, at the time I thought that I had followed the manufacturers recommendation and the stuff should have been on there.


Next time there will be a very thick coat of the clear stuff as well as the wax.
 
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