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Hey Everyone,

Just filled up my 05 SV for the second time, and went 175 on 3.4 gallons. I'm assuming 3.3 gallons would have been a more accurate fill amount, as the bike would not start. Oil lamp icon was on on the dash, and so was the red light under the neutral light.

I had some help syphoning some of the fuel off the top and then I was on my way.

I was careful to not fill it to the neck, but I guess I went too high?

Just wondering if there was an easier way to drain that little bit out than getting a mouthful of 91, is there?

What land mark inside the tank do you guys use to know it's time to stop? Thanks!
 

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I've filled mine to the point of overflowing (using a jerrycan at a track day and a nubile young thing wandered by). Didn't have any issues. Normally I fill mine to **** near the top.
 

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I top mine off every single time. Never had an issue. There isn't anything connected to the tank that should prevent the bike from starting.

The oil light will always be on when the engine isn't running. That's a low oil pressure light, No engine speed, no oil pressure.


Did you look over the simple things, like the kill switch, or making sure the kickstand is up? We've all done it.
 

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91 octane? The SV should run fine on plain old 87 octane Regular. Paying more for the higher grades doesn't produce any more power, although advertising would lead you to think it might have more detergent in it!
 

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I always fill to the bottom of the neck, which is a good basis point to do my mpg calculations.

I've never had an issue with starting.
 

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91 octane? The SV should run fine on plain old 87 octane Regular. Paying more for the higher grades doesn't produce any more power, although advertising would lead you to think it might have more detergent in it!
Sorry don't mean to threadjack.
In Wisconsin I've run all 3 grades. If I run 87 my bike just doesn't have the oomph that it does on 93 or 91 depending on where you get premium. On 87 my mileage suffers compared to 91 or 93.
 

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Sorry don't mean to threadjack.
In Wisconsin I've run all 3 grades. If I run 87 my bike just doesn't have the oomph that it does on 93 or 91 depending on where you get premium. On 87 my mileage suffers compared to 91 or 93.
Its all in your head. You should read up on fuel octane ratings. If your bike is not tuned for higher octane, you are wasting your money.
 

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Its all in your head. You should read up on fuel octane ratings. If your bike is not tuned for higher octane, you are wasting your money.
It's not. In Wisconsin the lower grades are full of ethanol. Premium in most stations is ethanol free. Ethanol is known to reduce performance, mileage, and also gum up the fuel system.
 

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91 Octane is for higher compression engines. The octane determines when the fuel will ignite due to compression. The SV has a compression ratio of 11.5:1. That is high. I put 91 in mine because of the compression ratio. If you use a lower octane and push the bike it can produce a knock.
 

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91 Octane is for higher compression engines. The octane determines when the fuel will ignite due to compression. The SV has a compression ratio of 11.5:1. That is high. I put 91 in mine because of the compression ratio. If you use a lower octane and push the bike it can produce a knock.

Thanks for playing. Try again.

Why is it that the engineers that designed it call for 87?
 

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Seems to me like the two best types of threads are those which involve fuel octane and motor oil. That's where everybody's incorrect hypothesis' come out and are displayed as facts that more people then believe and spread. It's really quite simple. The SV is designed to use 87 octane gas and you fill it up til you have a full tank. No "landmarks" necessary. It will not run any better on higher octane; it is in fact likely to run worse. And I live in WI and run 87 gas from Shell, Mobil, and BP and have never seen any of the performance related drawbacks mentioned about Wisconsin's 87 gas.
 

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Its all in your head. You should read up on fuel octane ratings. If your bike is not tuned for higher octane, you are wasting your money.

I find i get better mpg, but i dont know that it is enough for me to spend the extra money, but i would think 93 is a cleaner burning fuel then 87. On another note not to thread jack but are the sv650 and sv1000 capable of running e85, without a tune?
 

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I find i get better mpg, but i dont know that it is enough for me to spend the extra money, but i would think 93 is a cleaner burning fuel then 87. On another note not to thread jack but are the sv650 and sv1000 capable of running e85, without a tune?
Octane rating has absolutely nothing to do with how 'clean' a fuel burns. It has everything to do with how well the fuel resists detonation.
 

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are the sv650 and sv1000 capable of running e85, without a tune?
Absolutely NOT. You'd need to richen the mixture dramatically to use that stuff. I'm not sure the injectors are large enough even if you could alter the ECU. And, the rubber in the fuel system likely wouldn't appreciate that stuff in the tank.:)

Just to throw something out, what fuel octane an engine needs is largely dependent on how much compression pressure it can make before the ignition event happens. Compression ratio is only one part of the story. The cam timing controls what some call the 'dynamic compression' and long events reduce the pressures at low speeds. This can allow a high static compression engine to use low octane fuel successfully as the actual pressures developed at low rpm's aren't too high for it.

I've bumped the timing 4 degrees on my 1K, and it DOES make weird and uncomfortable sounds if you lug it down around 2500 on 87. I'm not sure if it is actually detonating, but run at least 89 and don't load the motor below 3000 to keep it running happily.
 

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I always fill to the bottom of the neck, which is a good basis point to do my mpg calculations.

I've never had an issue with starting.
That's the same point I use - 2.6 gallons +/- 0.1 gallon every time.

I've bumped the timing 4 degrees on my 1K, and it DOES make weird and uncomfortable sounds if you lug it down around 2500 on 87. I'm not sure if it is actually detonating, but run at least 89 and don't load the motor below 3000 to keep it running happily.
Advancing the ignition timing changes what the engineers planned for an engine designed to run 87 octane, in this case 91 could be not only beneficial but necessary.

So would you rather have E10 87 or pure 91 with no ethanol?
With as often as I empty/refill my tank, I'd prefer the E10 87; if it were going to sit for awhile I'd rather the straight 91.
 

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91 Octane is for higher compression engines. .
old school thinking from when engines were cast iron and ran hot


combustion chamber temperature is more important than compression when determining octane requirement. its modern design and cooler engine temps that allow high compression engines to run lower octane

Harley's have lower compression but require premium, why, cause they are air cooled run hotter


fwiw, on very hot days, I have found the SV needs premium
 

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So would you rather have E10 87 or pure 91 with no ethanol?
Depends on the cost of the gasoline. Where I get my gas, 87 is available with 10% ethanol for 3.50 per gallon. 89 is available with no ethanol for 3.60 (it's a 10 cent difference no matter what the cost of regular is).

Anyway, I've calculated that since ethanol has a much lower energy content than gasoline, filling with pure gasoline 89 actually results in me buying more units of energy per unit of currency. So I do that.

If I could still find 87 with no ethanol (used to be able to), I'd run that. I guess if pure gas 89 was considerably more expensive than E10 87 (so much so that I wasn't getting the most energy for my dollar), I'd probably get the 87.

So yes, running 87 might in theory give you imperceptible losses in mileage and performance IF that 87 is blended with ethanol, since E10 has less energy per gallon than pure gas. However, this has NOTHING to do with the octane rating, and everything to do with the fact that there is ethanol in your 87 octane gasoline.
 
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