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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, new guy here with a stupid question .
I know crush washer should me 12mm but I’m so confused which exactly to buy.
can you post a link to Amazon which exactly to buy?
mine has been crushed to a paper thin and stil doesn’t leak
I prefer aluminum. Less of dissimilar metals reaction over Time.
thank you
 

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I actually use copper Nissan washers. No ill effects after 63000 miles and 15 years. Remember the plug is steel and the case is aluminum so you already have a problem with dissimilar metals. I do oil changes with a fresh washer every 3000 miles.

I'd get M12x16 if you were looking to buy generic aluminum crush washers. M12x18 is probably wider than the head of the drain plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Aluminum washer would be less reactive than copper.
When using cooper one adds another metal in a sandwich.

I have been successful with my paper thin washer for the last 20k miles.

would this one work?
20 Pcs Aluminum Oil Drain Plug Gaskets Washers Seals for Honda Accord Civic CR-V/CRV Acura Odyssey Element, Replacement for the Part # 94109-14000 Amazon.com: 20 Pcs Aluminum Oil Drain Plug Gaskets Washers Seals for Honda Accord Civic CR-V/CRV Acura Odyssey Element, Replacement for the Part # 94109-14000: Automotive
 

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Aluminum washer would be less reactive than copper.
When using cooper you one adds another metal in a sandwich.

I have been successful with my paper thin washer for the last 20k miles.

would this one work?
20 Pcs Aluminum Oil Drain Plug Gaskets Washers Seals for Honda Accord Civic CR-V/CRV Acura Odyssey Element, Replacement for the Part # 94109-14000 Amazon.com: 20 Pcs Aluminum Oil Drain Plug Gaskets Washers Seals for Honda Accord Civic CR-V/CRV Acura Odyssey Element, Replacement for the Part # 94109-14000: Automotive
I won't argue. It's your bike, you do what you feel is right. And no, Honda uses M14x20 washers.
 

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O'Reilly auto parts. Dorman part# 095-143. 69 cents each when I bought a few last year.
Plenty folks reuse the same washer for a long time. IMO, if you are spending about $10 on a filter, and another $20 or more on oil, but won't spend 69 cents on a new washer, well....
 

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I've never understood why people call the oil drain bolt washer a "crush" washer. A true crush washer is one that is used once because in using it it is crushed by the force of whatever is against it, like the washers used in the head to seal the headers to the head. I've been wrenching on cars and bikes since the seventies and I've never replaced an oil drain bolt washer.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I heard the drain bolts washer is to crush and protect threads from beeing stripped When too much force is applied
 

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Maybe the SV Suzuki part isn’t a true crush washer, but my R1 oil drain washer definitely is one and you do not want to reuse it. I believe the Honda ones are that way as well.
 

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I use Honda part number 92065-097 drain plug gasket.
 

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Maybe a washer from the spark plug should be changed after cleaning and gap adjusting. Whatever.
 

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Maybe the SV Suzuki part isn’t a true crush washer, but my R1 oil drain washer definitely is one and you do not want to reuse it. I believe the Honda ones are that way as well.
I've owned a bunch of Hondas, the last one being a '13 CB1100, and they have regular aluminum washers.
 

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I heard the drain bolts washer is to crush and protect threads from beeing stripped When too much force is applied
You can definitely keep cranking on the bolt and strip it despite the crush washer. Ask any gorilla working at a quick lube like Valvoline or Jiffy Lube.

For whatever it's worth, I've also been a mechanic for over a decade. About half my experience is with German cars. Both Mercedes and BMW use aluminum pans, steel bolts, and copper washers. VW/Audi used steel bolts, aluminum pans, and aluminum washers. Because Mercedes and BMW are kind enough to regularly supply a new washer in the package with the oil filter, I always changed them. I heard that VW dealers changed the whole bolt (it comes with a washer) and throw out the old one. VW/Audi has since switched to some kind of plastic plug I'm sure they replace.

In the general service industry I've seen a lot of reused drain plug washers. Few leaked, even the ones that were paper thin, so you can certainly get away with it if you want. Since I started with German cars, I always change the washer during an oil change.

That said, there are parts that the manufacturer says are one-time use only that I DO reuse. Self-locking nuts are a good example. I do replace them if they come with a new part, which they often do, but I don't replace them if I am removing a part for access to another part.

My favorite drain plug style was on my Saturn. It had a large shoulder and a built-in rubber gasket that didn't need to be replaced. It never leaked and you would have to do chinups with a breaker bar before you could strip the threads.
 
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