Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just installed a M4 high sport full system on my k8 SV650s. I am very happy with it so far but I am wondering if anyone has done the same and if you have did you work the O2 sensor into the new exhaust or just leave it hanging? how much difference does the O2 sensor make? right now i just pluged it in and left it hanging so that my FI light wouldn't come on. i can weld the threads into my midpipe to accept my stock O2 sensor but i want to know if it worth the truoble and how much difference the O2 sensor will make.
I have a PCIII that i will get programed soon, but i want to know if the O2 sensor will effect that before i pay to get it dyno-tuned.
thanks Jason
 

·
Chief Greeter
Joined
·
29,256 Posts
i just installed a M4 high sport full system on my k8 SV650s. I am very happy with it so far but I am wondering if anyone has done the same and if you have did you work the O2 sensor into the new exhaust or just leave it hanging? how much difference does the O2 sensor make? right now i just pluged it in and left it hanging so that my FI light wouldn't come on. i can weld the threads into my midpipe to accept my stock O2 sensor but i want to know if it worth the truoble and how much difference the O2 sensor will make.
I have a PCIII that i will get programed soon, but i want to know if the O2 sensor will effect that before i pay to get it dyno-tuned.
thanks Jason
Hi drinkbrew, I take its a CA model, yes? I copied this info but it pertains to autos:

Automotive oxygen sensors, colloquially known as O2 sensors, make modern electronic fuel injection and emission control possible. They determine if the air fuel ratio exiting a gas-combustion engine is rich (with unburnt fuel vapor) or lean (with excess oxygen). Closed-loop feedback-controlled fuel injection varies the fuel injector output according to real-time sensor data rather than operating with a predetermined (open-loop) fuel map. In addition to improving overall engine operation, they reduce the amounts of both unburnt fuel and oxides of nitrogen from entering the atmosphere. Unburnt fuel is pollution in the form of air-borne hydrocarbons, while oxides of nitrogen (NOx gases) are a result of excess air in the fuel mixture and cause smog and acid rain. Volvo was the first automobile manufacturer to employ this technology in the early 70s, along with the 3-way catalyst.

Information on oxygen concentration is sent to the engine management computer or ECU, which adjusts the mixture to give the engine the best possible fuel economy and lowest possible exhaust emissions. Failure of these sensors, either through normal aging, the use of leaded fuels, or fuel contamination with silicones or silicates, for example, can lead to damage of an automobile's catalytic converter and expensive repairs.

Tampering with or modifying the signal that the oxygen sensor sends to the engine computer can be detrimental to emissions control and can even damage the engine. When the engine is under low-load conditions (such as when accelerating very gently, or maintaining a constant speed), it is operating in 'closed-loop mode'. This refers to a feedback loop between the fuel injectors and the oxygen sensor, to maintain stoichiometric ratio. If modifications cause the mixture to run lean, there will be a slight increase in fuel economy, but a possible increase in nitrogen oxide emissions (dependent on excess air and high combustion temperatures although leaner mixtures have lower peak temperatures due to a slower burn), possible misfiring (at ultra-lean mixtures), and slightly higher exhaust gas temperatures. If modifications cause the mixture to run rich, then there will be a slight increase in power, again at the risk of overheating and igniting the catalytic converter, while decreasing fuel economy and increasing hydrocarbon emissions.

When an internal combustion engine is under high load (such as when using wide open throttle), the output of the oxygen sensor is ignored, and the engine automatically enriches the mixture to protect the engine. Any changes in the sensor output will be ignored in this state, as are changes from the air flow meter, which might otherwise lower engine performance due to the mixture being too rich or too lean, and increase the risk of engine damage due to detonation if the mixture is too lean.

It may be possible to program so it will not run on the lean side. Since there is no catalytic if it runs a little rich it doesn't sound as bad as running lean. Or just run it WOT all the time, lol. But it is for emissions so maybe it should be plumbed into your exhaust. Have you asked M4 about it? Or a motorcycle performance shop? Good luck, please let us know what you do. Thanks!
 

·
Chief Greeter
Joined
·
29,256 Posts
Also copied this, note line in "quotes":

Dynojet Power Commander 3 USB (PC3 USB)

The Power Commander PC3 USB offers several features to ease the tuning of your Fuel Injection system.

USB Port provides an instant, problem free way to connect your PC to your Power Commander.

The PC3 USB provides a precise way to fine tune your motorcycle when adding a new high flow air filter, performance exhaust or other engine modifications to improve engine performance.

Each unit includes a built in microprocessor and specific MAP designed to improve performance overstock ECU.

If you do not own a computer you can change your settings with three push buttons located on the face plate.

No wiring modifications are needed to install the PC3 USB all connectors are OEM Style.

"Direct injector control technology manages the fuel curve on models that do not have sensors to monitor fuel adjustment."

Features an additional expansion port for Dynojet accessories.

Software is compatible with Windows 98se/ME/2000/XP.

USB special cable is included.

Made in the USA.

DYNOJET continuously develops new maps for all models, these are available for download at (www.powercommander.com).

Order Dynojet PC3 USB Power Commanders here!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
I'll guess that a muffler shop would add a O2 sensor bung for $30 if they have the appropriate threads for the sv sensor. Why not just install it? Power commanders are not the most reliable things in the world, you might need to remove it later for one reason or another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
The PC comes with an O2 bypass for bikes equipped. The PC adds and subtracts from the stock ECU's base map. If you leave the O2 hanging, the ECU will not use the base map and the PC will have no set point of reference.
 

·
Chief Greeter
Joined
·
29,256 Posts
I'm guessing if the power commander overides the fuel mixture anyways it's probobly pointless to have the O2 sensor working?
Hi drinkbrew, I called these guys and asked the question about exhaust and o2 sensor and power commander.

http://www.superbikenation.com/

They have plugs that replace the o2 senor, you don't need it since the power commander program controls everything.

eddiemon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
hey guys,
I stumbled upon this post because I am thinking about buying the m4 high mount exhaust slip on. I do have CA model bike and now I'm a little confused about the sensor. Where is it located and if I buy the exhaust does it come with a kit that might help me figure out where to put the sensor? Also, it looks like they might have soldered the bolts that hold on the pipe. Do i just solder that off or do i just cut that whole section of the pipe off? Thanks for you help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
if you get the slip on you won't have to worry about the sensor, for the slip on you will have to cut the stock pipe after the sensor so it will not be effected at all. that being said if you can afford the full system it is the way to go, if you just want a better sound the slip on will be fine. from what i hear blair has some good prices on the M4s. I already bought mine before i found out he is a M4 dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
if you get the slip on you won't have to worry about the sensor, for the slip on you will have to cut the stock pipe after the sensor so it will not be effected at all. that being said if you can afford the full system it is the way to go, if you just want a better sound the slip on will be fine. from what i hear blair has some good prices on the M4s. I already bought mine before i found out he is a M4 dealer.
thanks for your help!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Hi drinkbrew, I called these guys and asked the question about exhaust and o2 sensor and power commander.

http://www.superbikenation.com/

They have plugs that replace the o2 senor, you don't need it since the power commander program controls everything.

eddiemon
Have you or anyone else done this to fix a problem with the FI light coming on. I have an 07 sv650s CA model with a leo vince full system and a power commander and I believe my FI is coming on due to the O2 censor and am assuming this plug might be the fix. Just curious if anyone else has been successful at fixing this problem? thanks,
Joe
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top