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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got up the nerve to shim the valves on my 07 SV a couple weeks back. Bike has 48k on it and all 8 vavles were right at the minimum. I read up on it and took a slow studied approach. It was a major undertaking, but nonetheless went pretty well in the end. Bike fired right up and ran strong with no noticeably oil leaks upon completion. Compared to my 01 SV the 07 always seemed to have more engine noise, pacifically valve train noise. After shim job seems like even more valve chain noise than I remember. A stethoscope thing quickly revealed that virtually all the cam chain noise was coming from the front cylinder. I had some difficulty getting the rear cylinder CCT bolt that pushes the spring against the ratchet plunger started because of an awkward working position and because it was already pushing against the spring a bit before engaging the threads. However, I had no trouble at all screwing in the same bolt on the front cylinder with my fingers. I ordered a new spring from Ron Ayers, and with that in hand, I pulled the tank, air box, and front CCT yesterday. Right off I noticed that the plunger was pushed out further that the rear one had been. Old spring turns out to be exactly like the new one; well, maybe .020 shorter. There's been discussion about “lazy” CCTs on (Brit?) SV forums. Some say just ignore it. Others have gone to aftermarket manual adjusters (with the warning that if you get it too tight you'll ruin your engine). I like the design of the ratcheting CCT and am inclined to stick with it, only with a bit of modification. I'm thinking about making a stud with a collar on my old Logan lathe that would slip fit up into the spring about a ½ inch on one end and out over the end of spring 1/8 to ¼ inch on the other, thus extending the spring out a bit more, perhaps with some by feel adjustment when screwing in the retaining bolt. Suggestions and comments most welcome.
 

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Did you remove the tensioner to inspect it? If not...might be worth a try. Have seen pictures of bad SV tensioners....the teeth where the ratchet engages wear down and don't hold well. Very obvious type wear if that is what is happening. If everything looks good inside it...there shouldn't be a discernible difference between front and rear chain noise IMO. It IS possible to have a chain wear out and fail....I'd want to either fix the tensioner or replace the chain if it is noisy with a good tensioner. You might save a LOT of money by catching this now.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rob, your post prompted me to inspect the CCT ratchet mechanism closely. Ratchet teeth look sharp, whole thing looks fine and seems to work fine playing with it. Ratchet shaft is blued and you can see where it's been engaged and where it's worked it's way out a few teeth over time, maybe a 1/4 inch. Original owner was a good friend; bike has never been ran hard. Yet and so, it does appear the chain has stretched some over 48k miles. I haven't checked to see if anyone makes a chain with a master link for this bike. Replacing the chain would be a major tear down and expense. Probably be cheaper to buy a low mileage engine off ebay. Unsure how I'll proceed at this point. Your our input appreciated. thanks, ken
 

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I think there should be a spec somewhere to allow you to gauge your chain health. So many links should be no longer than 'X'. If you can find something like that (might be in the manual...I haven't looked) you could make the call with confidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've been riding my 01 SV and meditating on the 07 SV cam chain situation the past few days. New insight has emerged: whereas my initial impression was that the chain was noisy because of running too loose, I'm now thinking it may well be it's running noisily due to being too tight. It makes a whirring noise not a flopping noise. I remembered reading on a forum somewhere that one should turn the engine while tightening the adjuster bolt. I didn't do that when I reassembled it after shimming front cylinder. Going to experiment with this, and may purchase a manual adjuster ($50 I think) as well to gain absolute control. Stretched or not; there shouldn't be anymore chain noise after shimming than before. And, yes, I remember seeing something about a cam chain stretch test somewhere, similar to stretch test for drive chain. In hindsight, I should have checked chain stretch when I had the cams out, but was solely focused on shimming.
thanks for input, ken
 

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Never messed with a Cam chain but if I was gona change it I'd get a helper. Use chain breaker an make sure I had rivet type master link. Id break original chain hook new to the old turn engine over with tension on chains till new one poped out. Rivet an retime everything.
 

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Stretched or not; there shouldn't be anymore chain noise after shimming than before.
Well if the valves were tight, that would put extra tension on the tight side of the chain without the pensioner. Once clearance was changed, there would be less tension. So that would add some noise, just depends on how tight things were running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well if the valves were tight, that would put extra tension on the tight side of the chain without the pensioner. Once clearance was changed, there would be less tension. So that would add some noise, just depends on how tight things were running.
Boing, I remember reading an article in a cycle mag several years back about a company that offered a master link timing chain making it very easy to replace same on a sports bike. Great idea. all you'd really have to do is come up with a master link; it would be easy to cut a link out of an OEM chain. Cam chains on 4 cylinder bikes are heavier than the ones used on the essentially one cylinder SV650, but likely same as used on all the 650 dual purpose singles. If anyone knows of someone who offers this aftermarket alternative, I'd love to hear about it -- would make a twenty hour job a twenty minute job. At this point I don't know that my cam chain needs replacing, yet and so would love to know if this option is available.

I'm not sure I agree that changing valve clearance a couple thou would affect cam chain tention -- will have to contemplate that.
ken
 

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Changing a cam chain shouldn't be a twenty hour job. You don't have to split the cases. Maybe five hours if you are taking your sweet time and adjust your valves while you go about.

You just have to yank the clutch, flywheel, and cams and then bring the new chain up from the bottom. This is completely unlike most inline 4 bikes where the cases do need to be split.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Changing a cam chain shouldn't be a twenty hour job. You don't have to split the cases. Maybe five hours if you are taking your sweet time and adjust your valves while you go about.

You just have to yank the clutch, flywheel, and cams and then bring the new chain up from the bottom. This is completely unlike most inline 4 bikes where the cases do need to be split.
Appreciate your input here and fact that cam chain can be changed without removing engine and splitting cases is new and valued information. However, your description applies to the rear cylinder. You seem to have some depth of experience here; does the same procedure also apply to the front by removing stator and rotor thus gaining access needed to replace chain? Also, is special tool needed to remove rotor? I have yet to do a stretch test to determine if a new chain is needed here. Want to get this thing back up and running, but the luxury of having a 2nd SV to ride has allowed me moil in pissed mode regarding valve shim experience and do nothing; and must say it has been productive to wait and get input -- thanks to all, ken
 

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Flywheel=rotor to me. No need to take the stator out. Just unclip the harness. To remove the rotor you just need a really big bolt or a rotor puller. I'm trying to remember if this can be done without taking the head off (because the other cam chain guide). It'd be worth a shot without the heads off.

This would make a good Saturday project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Cam chain noise solved. A week ago I removed the tank, air box, and CCT from the 07 SV for inspection. There had been a very discernible, whirring cam chain noise in the front cylinder the first time I fired up the bike after shimming all eight valves (they were all at the minimum). Everything about the CCT looked fine. Yesterday, I resembled everything only this time I manually turned the engine as I tightened the spring retaining bolt on the CCT in steps. I'd remembered this procedure being advised from reading a comment on one of the threads somewhere. Fired the bike up and no more cam chain noise in front cylinder just a bit more normal valve train noise resulting from looser clearances. One exhaust valve on the rear cylinder is at .011 and using a stethoscope (or piece of hose) you definitely hear it clicking. Need to do a couple more short test rides to restore confidence and top off the radiator. Then, assuming confidence level reading in high range, I'll take on checking and shimming my 01 SV which is 10k miles overdue. This forum is huge asset and special thanks to those who contributed to this thread. Ken
 
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