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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I've read just about every thread I could find online about cam chain noise, and I wanted to confirm a couple of things I couldn’t from these previous threads.

I have a 2006 SVS that I bought recently and just had a valve check and adjustment, including the cam chains, and everything was adjusted to spec.

I went riding for a while, and found the bike makes a very noticeable ticking noise from time to time. Sometimes the engine is quiet, then goes to very ticky, and then back again. I'm assuming this is my tensioner adjusting the cam chains loose and tight?

My 2003 SVS never ticked like this, but from what I've read it varies from bike to bike and whether or not they have a "lazy" cam chain tensioner. So I'm under the assumption that if you have a lazy tensioner, your bike will tick noticeable occasionally.

I wanted to confirm...

1. The sound doesn't bother me, so if my bike ticks can I leave it alone or should I change the tensioner?

2. Is a lazy tensioner more likely to fail? If so, how do you know when the tensioner fails?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Trust me,you will KNOW if it fails.
The chain will make a heavy slapping/knocking sound.
Sounds like it's on it's last legs.
Tickety is a happy sound :)
Cool. Just so I'm sure, the sound of the cam chain is an obvious "tick", not your typical light tapping of the valves or the tsshh, tsshh, tsshh of the njectors?

Most important part for me is that if something should go bad, I'll know it.
 

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Same here. Had a suzuki certified mechanic check my valve clearances and asked him about it. He said that he had owned both TLs and SVs that made the noise you are describing(just like mine) and that it was perfectly normal. I also talked to a guy who owned a first gen that had a failed cam chain tensioner and he said there was no you would ride the bike with the racket it made.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm probably going to keep it like it is until I notice it get worse.

The front OEM tensioner is $69 and the labor is $62, with tax it's something like $140 to have my Indy shop do the service.

I'm contemplating doing an aftermarket manual tensioner, they are actually cheaper and have some performance advantages over the automatic ones. But only for the front, the rear looks like it would be very difficult to reach.
 

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I'm probably going to keep it like it is until I notice it get worse.

The front OEM tensioner is $69 and the labor is $62, with tax it's something like $140 to have my Indy shop do the service.

I'm contemplating doing an aftermarket manual tensioner, they are actually cheaper and have some performance advantages over the automatic ones. But only for the front, the rear looks like it would be very difficult to reach.
The rear is not that bad to get to. I just did a cam swap and valve adjustment. you just need to remove the right side rear set and use an extension on the ratchet. hold a flashlight from above the bike and aim it down behind the head
 

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My cam chain is different. Wish I could listen to another bike side-by-side. Taken to two mechanics - first said worn chain guides, second said worn tensioner/chain. This on 42,000 km engine.

Anyway my front cylinder makes an intermittent shushing sound, at idle, if that makes any sense. Can anyone report anything similar? I have scanned a couple threads and couldn't find any similar descriptions. My last mid-size bike was a Yamaha FZ6, on which I had tensioner replaced and that one made a distinct rattle sound, for which those bikes are notorious. This sound is completely removed from the Yammie.
 

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The rear is not that bad to get to. I just did a cam swap and valve adjustment. you just need to remove the right side rear set and use an extension on the ratchet. hold a flashlight from above the bike and aim it down behind the head
Getting the tensioners removed isn't the problem, it's adjusting them (manual tensioners) while they are in place. I had them on my '00, and removed them and went back to OEM tensioners for this reason.
 

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A month ago the camchain ticking started for me. I went to two shops and they both said the same as doxiedog and that I shouldn't be worried.
Trust me,you will KNOW if it fails.
The chain will make a heavy slapping/knocking sound.
Sounds like it's on it's last legs.
Tickety is a happy sound
Since my valves were adjusted a short time ago, I asked them if it would hold out till the next valve adjustment in 20.000km...he couldn't be sure.

If I would hear the heavier slapping/knocking they told me to stop / drive very carfully and not hard accelerate and have it fixed.
 

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I had a ticking noise on my 2000 sv650 with less than 9000 miles on it. I was able to fix it by:
1. removed the cam chain tensioner
2. turned the engine over a few times by hand, and while doing this I heard a slight pop from the plastic tensioner plate
3. Re-installed the cct

The front cam chain tensioner has been quiet now for the last 2500 miles or so
 

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I am constantly nervous of my bike's noises but it just seems to be normal. You just have to stop thinking about it.
 

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Hi, first sorry for my bad english...So my Sv starting make this noise when I change the stock exhaust with the aftermarket one. There’s have and some more vibration on the legs...will this is it be from the new exhaust or maybe the CCT? There’s a video:

 

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A trick I use at work is to take a piece of hose about 6-8mm inside diameter and maybe a meter or meter and a half long and put one end to my ear and use the other end to listen. Don't touch the hose to anything, just put it close. If exhaust is leaking, you will hear/feel air puffing up the hose and into your ear.

Another trick is to use a long screwdriver. Touch the tip to the area you want to listen to and press your ear to the handle.

You can listen directly to the cam chain tensioners or other parts of the engine with the screwdriver and listen around all the exhaust joints with the hose. Sometimes, I can even feel the noise by the way the screwdriver feels even before I press my ear to it.
 

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A trick I use at work is to take a piece of hose about 6-8mm inside diameter and maybe a meter or meter and a half long and put one end to my ear and use the other end to listen. Don't touch the hose to anything, just put it close. If exhaust is leaking, you will hear/feel air puffing up the hose and into your ear.

Another trick is to use a long screwdriver. Touch the tip to the area you want to listen to and press your ear to the handle.

You can listen directly to the cam chain tensioners or other parts of the engine with the screwdriver and listen around all the exhaust joints with the hose. Sometimes, I can even feel the noise by the way the screwdriver feels even before I press my ear to it.
Thanks, man! I’ll try this tricks this days and I’ll wrote for the results! I hope the sounds and vibrations is from the exhaust and not from anything else!
 
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