Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did some googling and apparently... NGK manufactures their sparkplugs with an antiseize coating.

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/tb-0630111antisieze.pdf

Anyone else ever install NGK spark plugs without antiseize? I put mine in without antiseize because my bike really needed new sparkplugs, and I forgot about the antiseize until I finished. Just debating on whetehr or not I should go buy antiseize and fish the sparkplugs back out and reinstall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,757 Posts
That should be fine. I haven't seen a seized spark plug except in two cases: 150,000 mile Sentra with original plugs, and Ford trucks with the notorious plug seizing issue (they even make special tools to help extract broken plugs).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,849 Posts
and Ford trucks with the notorious plug seizing issue (they even make special tools to help extract broken plugs)
Those Suck SO bad! But....we've found doing a SeaFoam treatment beforehand allows you to remove the plugs with little fear of breaking them. It really eats all the carbon off the combustion chamber that locks that stupid idea of a sparkplug in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those Suck SO bad! But....we've found doing a SeaFoam treatment beforehand allows you to remove the plugs with little fear of breaking them. It really eats all the carbon off the combustion chamber that locks that stupid idea of a sparkplug in place.
Does that work on all engines? My plugs were a bit stubborn during removal even though I did have antiseize on my last change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,849 Posts
Does that work on all engines? My plugs were a bit stubborn during removal even though I did have antiseize on my last change.

It sure couldn't hurt! The Ford 3-valve plugs are especially bad with the extended probe sticking through the head into the combustion chamber. But I'm pretty much sold on SeaFoam and how it can eat carbon. Maybe give it a try on the next plug change and see if it helps?

Oh...I've taken out probably thousands of plugs and the ones that weren't really tight breaking loose seem to be the ones that are stubborn all the way out. If a plug isn't tightened fully, they tend to leak a little (you can see the soot on the base many times) and this leakage flow is what cruds up the threads methinks. You certainly don't want to make them too tight...but just right is best.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It sure couldn't hurt! The Ford 3-valve plugs are especially bad with the extended probe sticking through the head into the combustion chamber. But I'm pretty much sold on SeaFoam and how it can eat carbon. Maybe give it a try on the next plug change and see if it helps?

Oh...I've taken out probably thousands of plugs and the ones that weren't really tight breaking loose seem to be the ones that are stubborn all the way out. If a plug isn't tightened fully, they tend to leak a little (you can see the soot on the base many times) and this leakage flow is what cruds up the threads methinks. You certainly don't want to make them too tight...but just right is best.:)
I coulda swore I tightened them all the way in! :/ I don't remember seeing a lot of soot but then again, the only other pair of spark plugs I've seen had close to 20k miles on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,849 Posts
I coulda swore I tightened them all the way in! :/ I don't remember seeing a lot of soot but then again, the only other pair of spark plugs I've seen had close to 20k miles on them.
I thought about this today at work...and think the plug design might be the main culprit in them being stubborn. If the end sticks into the chamber very far, it can get damaged by the fire. Many plugs I have to remove have 100K+miles on them.:( They can be tough sometimes. The SeaFoam treatment sure wouldn't hurt anything and would probably help most plug changes if you can talk the owner into letting you do it.

Today I was pulling Bosch Platinum's (single ground) out of a Dodge 5.2. They do NOT want to come out! Some weren't torqued properly and fought all the way out, and others that were tight pretty much the same thing. The end threads seemed distorted and were the cause of the resistance...don't think SeaFoam can fix metal. I wish people wouldn't run engines until they start to misfire before thinking about a tune-up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,757 Posts
A lot of the time I feel like if they were just cracked free every 30k or so and then retorqued properly, then it wouldn't be such a big deal to replace them at 90 or 100k.

Then again, I switched out the platinum plugs for regular coppers in my own car at 60k and change them every 15k, so it hasn't been a problem.

What's the interval on the SV? 7500 miles? They won't have time to seize.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,849 Posts
A lot of the time I feel like if they were just cracked free every 30k or so and then retorqued properly, then it wouldn't be such a big deal to replace them at 90 or 100k.

Then again, I switched out the platinum plugs for regular coppers in my own car at 60k and change them every 15k, so it hasn't been a problem.

What's the interval on the SV? 7500 miles? They won't have time to seize.
Yes, I think they say 7500...which doesn't seem like much. I've changed them out twice now even though they looked like new. Might run this current set a while longer as an experiment to see if the performance degrades. Seems I remember people on here running 40K+ on the plugs. With the dual grounds (SV1K..does the 650 use them too?), they should wear a bit longer I'd think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,757 Posts
I don't remember what they look like, but I think you're right that they have two tips. I last replaced mine around 15k and I'm up to 27k. I should probably swap them. I think for some reason I had 14k in my head, which is the 2nd interval.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top