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Sorry I haven't been in contact for a while guys- busy riding my new baby, a blue SV650S. So here's the shindig:
Friday morning went perfect. I went into the dealership and signed my life away, picked up my $600 worth of riding gear, and had them deliver it to my house. They guy dropped it off, speed away and I took a good 30 minuets just examining the beauty of my new machine. The lines, the curves, the seduction! I then busted out my Turtle Wax premium gloss wax and detail mist and went to town on those seductive curves. So there was another 45 minuets.
I finally straddled the SV and thumbed the starter button. The 645-cc, DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder liquid-cooled 90-degree V-Twin fired to life and then settled into a 1500 rpm idle groove. Wow, this is one powerful machine. I give a quick gab of the throttle and engine barks to 7000 rpm without a care. I blip the throttle once more, for only 1 second, and it's at redline. This engine likes to be revved.
I pull the clutch back in and jab the shifter down into first. Stall. I look around thinking, "What the hell? I have the clutch in!" I put the shifter back into netural, pull in the clutch and thumb the starter again and the engine roars back to life. Pop the shifter down into first. Stall. Okay, now I'm getting angry. This goes an for another 3 tries, until I realize you need to have the kickstand up in order to put it into gear (thanks a lot Mr. Salesman). Okay, noob mistake, no big deal.
Now sence every bike is different, I decided to play the "clutch game" I usually play when I straddle a different bike that I'm not used to. This consist of popping the bike into 1st, and then slowly letting out the clutch without giving the engine any gas. This teaches precise clutch control and where the friction zone of the clutch is. I do this for about 30 minuets, just rolling in my driveway getting used to the clutch pickup. It's smooth and I love it.
Now I think I'm ready to practice giving it some gas. Mistake. I roll out in 1st and gently (or at least what I thought was gently) lay on the throttle. The front end geqts light and revs climb to 6500 rpm before I knew my name. I quickly tap the rear brake and pull in the clutch, and when I feel the front end is stable I pull on the front brake and come to a quick spot. Oh sh*t, this thing is fast. I just sit in the middle of my neighborhood road (which is never busy), my heart pounding and my brain thinking, "why did I get bike THIS powerful?" I flick it into netural and roll back to my driveway. I shut the engine off, roll it into my garage, and decide to park her for the night. I go to get off the bike, and guess what? The kickstand isn't engaged all the way and she takes a plunge. Breaks the side mirror clean off, but that's it. Wow, now I'm pissed. I deicde to sleep on it instead of doing something I'll regret in the near future.
Day two comes around and I have a new-found fear for this machine. But it's okay, I'll roll with the punches. I just tell myself "I can do it" over and over in my head and I suddenly have the confidence to mount her again. This time I treat the throttle like a loaded 12-gauge and I am able to get up to speed easily without getting the front end airborne. Just so I won't de a wheelie by accident, I try rolling in second. Doesn't work too well, but it works. I decide first is the way to go.
I spend about 2 1/2 hours just riding around a length of street. It has a small cresting hill and a few turns, so I teaches me good leasons. By the end of the night, I'm golden enough to ride around my neiborhood, and I even popped her into 3rd gear and topped 55mph! Taking it in strides.
Now on Sunday, I'm pretty confident and am able to ride easily without stalling. I quickly learn second gear doesn't go below 11 mph. I also learn that the brakes are fantastic, with a capital "F". Man, am I going to love this bike.
Late Sunday evening, around 10:00, I try some night riding in my neiborhood. I haven't been on a public road yet, so I still confident in the confines of the private-roaded neiborhood.
Monday rolls into place and I ride some more during the day (I don't goto work until 4:30 PM and get off at 11:45, hence the night riding practice) and I have a good feel for the bike. I decide to ride it into work. Well, it riding it into work goes without a hitch. On the ride back at night, I scared sh*tless that a deer will pop out in front of me, but thank God, it doesn't happen. On the way to work I take back roads (no highway travel, yet) and get into 4th gear around 68mph.
Now I am more confident on the bike, and I am leaning more into turns and being slightly more generous with the throttle. Still haven't engage 5th or 6th gear yet, and I'm not really itching to. Just being safe. All the hype about the headlights being weak I don't really understand- I turn on the highbeams and I can see as well as I can in my Toyota Camry at night. Reguardless, this is a fantastic bike and I am very happy with my purchase.
Now I have 92 miles on the clock and I just put in my first tank of gasoline- 93 octane premium, mind you. I hope gas mileage goes up after break-in, which I believe it will. I will ride her to work again tonight, and enjoy the wind against my helmet.
Just ride.


Dave
 

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Glad you like it!
However, I normally ride in 6th gear at 65mph. The tach would be at about 4500-5000RPM making your gas mileage considerably lower. You don't want to be revving it much over 8 or 9000 RPM for the break-in period anyway.
Take it easy and get motosliders.
 

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chickenwafer said:
...Now I think I'm ready to practice giving it some gas. Mistake. I roll out in 1st and gently (or at least what I thought was gently) lay on the throttle. The front end geqts light and revs climb to 6500 rpm before I knew my name. I quickly tap the rear brake and pull in the clutch, and when I feel the front end is stable I pull on the front brake and come to a quick spot. Oh sh*t, this thing is fast. I just sit in the middle of my neighborhood road (which is never busy), my heart pounding and my brain thinking, "why did I get bike THIS powerful?" I flick it into netural and roll back to my driveway. I shut the engine off, roll it into my garage, and decide to park her for the night. I go to get off the bike, and guess what? The kickstand isn't engaged all the way and she takes a plunge. Breaks the side mirror clean off, but that's it. Wow, now I'm pissed.
Now you know why so many of us old farts recommend some sort of 400-500cc parallel twin $800 beater for a first bike
Now I have 92 miles on the clock and I just put in my first tank of gasoline- 93 octane premium, mind you.
Don't waste your money- you're not doing your baby any special favor by running premium gas. The engine was designed to burn (and runs very happily on) 87 octane regular. If you install high compression pistons you'll need higher octane fuel to ward of preignition. But there's nothing special about 93 octane fuel, other than it is harder to ignite than 87 octane.

Glad you're having a good time!

Bill



Dave
 

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Glad you like the new bike! Definitely take an MSF course sometime soon in the future - there are a lot of road riding tips and info that you won't get anywhere else. Also, pushing 4th gear 70 is revving it a little high to just be cruising. Might want to shift up a gear to bring those revs down a little. Have fun with the new bike, and pick up some motosliders or any sliders for that matter to reduce the damage if it tips over again or you lowside out on the road.

-WhiteMtnCruiser
 

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That brings back fond memories of when I first got on my bike back in April. It was exhilerating and terrifying at the same time. I thought to myself, "You've gotta be crazy to ever get into 6th gear on this thing!"

Well, 8,000 miles and 6 months later, it's still exciting, but the edge has worn off considerably. Wow, I can't imagine what those squids think when they straddle a 600cc I4 for the first time on any kind of bike and ride it out of the dealership! However, I am thinking that instead of modding my baby this winter, I'm gonna pay off the note and get a new one for next season, just for the heck of it, not because I'm tired of my baby or anything.
 

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Congrats. Definitely take the MSF course, if you're popping wheelies unexpectedly, they will teach you throttle control, and a million other things that will make you a better rider. Take it easy, and enjoy.
 

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http://www.msf-usa.org/

PLEASE take the MSF course. It was only $100 here. Lots of fun. you'll learn a bunch of stuff that you didnt even realize you didnt know. really, you'll have a great time, loads of fun.

I was almost in the same boat as you when I first bought my bike. I had taken the MSF, and had put about 1500 miles on an old 250 cc beater. Rode my old 250 to the dealership, and rode the brand new sv home. I literally thought I was going to kill myself on the ride home that day.

Just be careful, take it easy, baby steps...you'll do fine.

enjoy the new bike, and welcome to the forum!
 

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That's great. Your story sounds just like I felt when I first got my bike. :) I was pretty nervous and did alot of the same things you did your first couple of days. I didn't drop it till a month later though. ;D

Everyone is right. Get Motosliders pronto! Take a MSF course and don't waste your money on premium gasoline.
 

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bmetz99 said:
The engine was designed to burn (and runs very happily on) 87 octane regular. If you install high compression pistons you'll need higher octane fuel to ward of preignition. But there's nothing special about 93 octane fuel, other than it is harder to ignite than 87 octane.
you will actually lose power on higher octane.
 

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chickenwafer said:
I just tell myself "I can do it" over and over in my head and I suddenly have the confidence to mount her again.
I love this line. ;D

But seriously, congrats on the bike, and sorry about your mirror. At least she's not pristine anymore, so the next thing that breaks won't be as big of a deal. Post up some pics when you get the chance.

Oh yeah, like everyone else, get yourself to the MSF course ASAP!
 

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Broke the mirror off eh?? Ooops... now it's ready to be a track bike !! ;D Just kidding of course. Take your time and take the MSF like everyone is going to recommend. I remember leaving after passing the course... I was so eager to get out and learn. And I most certainly did... once instructor demonstrated how an old 30hp BMW could smoke my shiny new 90hp GSX-R. It's all the rider... something to never forget.
 

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If you start getting scared...keep an eye or ear on the tach/engine noise. Keep it below 4k, then 5k, etc until you're comfortable.
I normally keep it below 6k when cruising or commuting and let-er-rip when its time to play.

I'd definitely recommend getting sliders, the MSF course, and maybe a couple books to help you learn about the best/safest way to ride your new toy.

Good job getting your gear right away.

Bike parts can always be replaced. Ride safe!
 

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Congratulations, buddy! Welcome.

I'll try to say this without coming off like I'm belittling anyone:
After reading through his thoughts about his first time with the SV, I finally understand why so many of you recommend the smaller bikes for newbies. For me, I basically got on and rode when I bought my bike (the SV was/is my first). All the switches and gears and the cages trying to hammer me was a little nerve-racking; but I didn't need to putt around the driveway or neighborhood.
Sincerely, I now see that for some people - myself included - things like this come fairly naturally. Or am I stupid and unaware of the dangers?
 

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I have to agree with shaggy, I was a little nervous my first time out. But After a few laps around the neighborhood, I was alot more confident and had no problems. I've ridden mountain bikes my whole life and a can drive a standard transmission car and I think those two things helped out the most. And of course my roomate telling me where the throttle is and the brakes. But I've heard alot of stories like this one, and have to wonder if it does come more naturally to some people and not to others.
 
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