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Discussion Starter #1
:)Greetings all!

I'm new to the world of motorcycling but am about to purchase an sv650k this week (at least i hope to).
I'm wondering if this is a good bike for a noob?

My msf class isn't until the 16th of sept but i want to go ahead and get my bike while the wife is still in tune w/the idea if ya know what i mean.

Is this a solid machine that i can grow into?
 

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You will get both responses here as many people think that it is too much bike for a new rider. I started on my SV and I have had a great time on it - I think that as long as you have a cool head and don't ride above your limits, you should be fine.
You might want to invest in frame sliders though www.motosliders.com
 

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I'll leave the "is this a good bike to start" to others but, as far as can you grow into it?

My SV's where my 4th & 5th bikes, I had 7yrs of riding in at the time and still had a blast with them (and kinda mis them now, 3yrs later).
 

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Welcome to SVRider!

The SV was my first bike, and I'm still happy with it 3 years later. I have no regrets buying it as my first.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Cool..thanks people!

Yep, i know it's pretty powerful for a noob but I have been putting off owning a bike for 11yrs because i didn't
feel like i could resist twisting the throttle and riding like a moron.

LOL...so I have been buying mustangs instead!

I've got three kids now, pay my bills on time, and enjoy national geographic. ;)

I'm thinking I can be a good boy.

Honestly, i'm a little scared and thus immensely respect the power the bike has.
Besides, couldn't i get in just as much trouble on a 750 cruiser?
 

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as people have said, there are "arguments" all the time when people ask if the sv is a good bike for a beginner.

my personal opinion is that it's not. i think you should get a used ex500 or gs500, learn on that, drop it a few times, then "upgrade" to a sv.

do a search or just browse through a couple pages on the board and read through the discussions. then make an eductated decision. but if you do choose the sv and get a brand new one, i'll be the first in line to say "i told you so" when you drop it within the first month of riding it :p
 
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That's another issue stranger...new vs. used.

I don't want to drop my bike so i'm thinking used may be good.
@ the same time I don't want someone's "problem" that has been beaten to death.

Isn't the gs500 a sport bike?
I don't want to be hunched over but don't want a cruiser either...that's part of the reason for looking @ the sv.
 

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I bought my 99 SV last year for that reason, I didn't want to drop a new bike. I got mine for $3000, which was probably about $500 too much, but I have had no problems at all with mine.
 

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FrebbyFrebb said:
That's another issue stranger...new vs. used.

I don't want to drop my bike so i'm thinking used may be good.
@ the same time I don't want someone's "problem" that has been beaten to death.

Isn't the gs500 a sport bike?
I don't want to be hunched over but don't want a cruiser either...that's part of the reason for looking @ the sv.
if you look hard enough, you can find one in good enough condition to learn on and not have a headache.

image google search for gs500: http://images.google.com/images?q=gs500&hl=en
 

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i gots and sv650s for my first bike and i never rode anything before i took my MSF class, I took my class and then bought the bike 3 days later and never had a problem, dropped it or any thing else, I pin that puppy to the redline all the time and it does have plenty of power, but not too much to get u in trouble to fast, like a full liter bike has, u get really good feed back and not to late before ur in serious trouble, anyway u can kill or hurt ur self just as easy with a gs500 or a ninja500, just have a kewl head and know ur limits, I personally feel that buying a bike that you don't really like or will want in a year is a waste of money, just buy some frame sliders and tell the kids to watch out for daddy's bike or your smash there PS2 with a hammer, lol good luck, ride safe, and have fun
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Wow!

Friendly site, i appreciate everyone's honesty.

Yeah Cobra, I rode dirtbikes some when i was a kid, raced bmx, race(d) my GT, etc...
Basically, if it's got wheels then it doesn't take me but a moment to catch on.

Not that i'll go knee dragging or anything, i'm just saying the inclination is there and that coupled w/a cool
head should keep me fairly safe (as far as my actions go).

I'll already have to deal w/my father in-law's crap for not getting a harley and my wife will prob only let me
(yeah i said, "LET ME") have one shot @ this.

Whatever i get i will have to hold onto for at least 3yrs or so before she'll give the ok to get another.
Don't want to get into a situation like I did w/my mustang.

First one was a v6 because it was a good price and i "could build it up to be as fast as a gt".
NOT!

SOLD!

Then I got a GT and figured i'd build it to cobra specs...

NOT..but it's paid for so, i'll keep it.
 

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AlexJ said:
You will get both responses here as many people think that it is too much bike for a new rider. I started on my SV and I have had a great time on it - I think that as long as you have a cool head and don't ride above your limits, you should be fine.
You might want to invest in frame sliders though www.motosliders.com
+100 for this
I can't stress enough how important it is to not ride above your limits and get frame sliders - just incase ;)
 

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Go for it, you sound like you have a cool head on your shoulders. I bought an 01 for my first bike back in the spring and nothing but fun has come from this relationship. While everyone is entitled to there own opinion, and while the 250 and 500 ninjas have broke in a lotta new riders, I wouldn't own one, it would be fun for about the first month. Once you realize that your 250 has the acceleration of a Taurus you would be disappointed with the money you could have put into an Sv. Respect is what this bike demands, don't give it enough and you'll end up in a ditch. Although if it is a red 1st gen a nice tree is always a possibility!


In my own humble personal opinion "The Sv is like a sore peter, you just cant beat it"
 

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i got my sv about 2 weeks ago...it is the only bike i have ever rode. The first day i had it i kept it in the yard just going through the first few gears. There is a slight incline in my driveway, so i pulled to the bottom of it, got some practice starting on a hill. I have only put 200 miles on it so far but if i had it to do all over again, i WOULD NOT change a thing. I think the SV is great first bike.

Just remember...frame sliders, good gear(wear it)...and CLUTCH.

And welcome to the SV family.
 

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Frebby:
Your description of your Mustang experience leads me to warn you that, even more than with a ride like a Mustang, you will want to $pend ca$h on your motorcycle.
Think used SV (if you really need to go SV; I'm a member of the GS500E as first bike camp).
Since a motorcycle is an easier-fix-it-yourself item than a car, you don't have to worry as much about the "buying somebody else's problem" situation. There are probably good used 99 and 00 SVs out there for under $3k. The less you lay out initially, the more you'll have available for mods like exhaust, suspension upgrades, the de regeur moto sliders or other frame sliders, and maybe some tuning items.

But definitely allow budget space for:
A great helmet
A comfortable (maybe 2) riding jacket
Proper abrasion resistant and armored riding pants (leather is nice but lots of good tex out there too)
Gloves
Boots

Ride well and be happy.
 

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Ahhh get yourself a new SV.  I just started riding motorcycles a few months ago, and never rode before.  No dirtbike or anything (BMX however).

I got a new SV and have learned pretty fast.  I have 1200 miles on it, and feel pretty comfortable.  I dont plan onlaying it down ever.  Just ride within your limits.

The bike has plenty of power.  I dont think its too much power for a noob.  I am starting to sense the need for more power. The thing is fast to 60 (like 3.5 seconds) but tops out at 130mph.  However, it still has enough power to always be fun to ride.

I suggest knowing how to drive a stick and work a clutch before trying to learn to ride a bike.
 

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frebby, IMO i think the SV is a great first bike. i took the MSF course (which i highly reccomend to anyone) and i learned to ride on the SV. i actually felt a lot more comfortable on the SV than i did on the bikes at the MSF course. the SV is great because it has the capacity to be faster than pretty much anything you'll encounter on the road but it is also relatively docile and easy to handle right off the bat. but definitely only ride within your limits and when and where you feel comfortable. safe riding to ya!!
 

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jason777 said:
I have 1200 miles on it, and feel pretty comfortable. I dont plan onlaying it down ever. Just ride within your limits.
Hmmm. I didn't "plan" on laying my bike down either; but it's happened twice. Once when I was cut off by an impatient jerk in low-speed city traffic and I grabbed too much brake too soon; and again when I was leaned over on a nice backroad and hit a tar snake. If you feel comfortable with 1200 miles of experience, think how uncomfortable you'll be to find yourself asphalt surfing some surprising day. Advising someone to "ride within their limits" especially a newer rider, is not meaningful advice. Limits are imposed by so many more circumstances than a rider's own experience and skill level. Weather, road surface, other riders, and other drivers all present circumstances which can result in "laying down" your bike.
I don't mean to pick on you, Jason, because we all reach it. But you seem to be at that stage of riding when you have achieved a false sense of competence based on limited experience. This is the stage when you must practice all the MSF emergency techniques again and make sure they're ingrained responses, not just rusty memories. And you can still hit a tar snake on a curve on a nice, sunny afternoon.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Wow!

You all are GREAT!

Yep, I dump money into the stang...
My cars have all been stick shift (is there any other way?) ;D
I plan on driving it in good weather the way i drive my car in the rain.
SLOW AND EASY.

Like I said, i'm actually a little scared (i know...wuss) but I think that's a good thing
in this case.

I'm taking the MSF course on Sept 16, 17, & 18 but may go ahead and get my bike now and
ride around the yard or something.

I have a buddy that builds custom choppers (www.gangsterchoppers.com) and he has already
told me I can pilot the 800cc yamaha cruiser he bought for his wife after i pass the msf course.

Here's what he said...
"To many new riders try to go fast on any bike and end up in trouble. The key is to get enough time/miles to where the foundations are ingrained in your mind to the point that it?s habit. Until then I recommend being extremely cautious and slow on any type of bike. The sport bikes happen to be less forgiving in this area then do cruisers. Many more new sport bike owners riding over there heads then on any other type of bike. With all that said, if you think you like the sv and it will fit all your needs, get it. Same thing goes with the shadow. Bottom line is you are the one that?s going to ride the thing and who?s going to pay for it."


I'm just trying to decide whether to get a sv or a honda shadow spirit.

I just think i'd be happier on the sv..i like the riding position compared to the cruisers and sport bikes.

I need to feel "in control" and I when I sit on diff bikes i don't feel as "in control" on the cruisers as i do
on the sv's.

Ya'll are a great group!
 

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FrebbyFrebb said:
:)Greetings all!

I'm new to the world of motorcycling but am about to purchase an sv650k this week (at least i hope to).
I'm wondering if this is a good bike for a noob?

My msf class isn't until the 16th of sept but i want to go ahead and get my bike while the wife is still in tune w/the idea if ya know what i mean.

Is this a solid machine that i can grow into?

The SV is a great first bike, just show some self-restraint and don't just jump on and go hel for leather otherwise your riding experience may end up pretty short-lived...

This is one of the best bikes ever made in my opinion, from the power output to the handelling to the modding comunity and after-market parts there's a whole world of growing and enjoyment just waiting for you...

I wouldn't recommend any other bike more highly for a first bike, this has everything you need plus plenty more without being over-the-top...

And let me be the first to welcome you to the first and last bike you'll ever want to own...
 
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