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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, I just bought a 2005 sv650s 4 days ago and went for a ride tonight and somehow, ran over a key and it went straight through my rear tire. Now my question is whether to patch it or get a new tire. I've done some searching, and it goes half and half to get a new tire vs patching it BUT thats usually for screws or nails. I had a key go through the tire, so its not exactly a small hole... My current situation is that since I just bought the bike, insurance, registration, I have almost no money left. I might be able to buy a new tire, but it depends on how much they run, its a bit too late to call around, but I just wanted some options and thoughts regarding how safe it would be to patch this. The bike isnt here, so I dont know what tire I currently have on there, but theres quite a lot of tread left. if you suggest a new tire, could you give me some options? Im new to riding, so Im basically a beginner. my current budget ~$120

 

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Replace it. Remember, you're only riding on two tires, if the patch is done wrong, and it goes, you're toast. Just my opinion. ?


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Don't risk it.
I like gambling, but not with my life. Budget no excuse either, since a crash due to sudden pressure loss could be much more expensive than a tire many ways. I've lost tire pressure on the highway in traffic, it sucks!

Suggestion to save money: if you are near a race track, stop by on a race day or track day. Some riders will sell "take off" tires for 30 or 40 bucks, street/dot legal, with most wear way over on the edge where, as a beginning rider, you will probably never put any more wear. Not new, but much safer than a plugged tire...if you bring your wheel with you, might be able to get it mounted for cheap at the track too, since tire vendors are there.

Good luck and keep the shiny side up!

Gary
 

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I can imagine you are pretty discouraged because that really sucks. If the hole is not too far from the center of the tread, I might be inclined to see if a "gummy worm" plug would hold long enough to replenish the budget and buy a new tire. If it works, ride like a grandma until you can replace the tire. Check the pressure and the plug before every ride and take it easy and you should be OK temporarily. You can buy a plug kit for less than $10 and it is good to have anyway. Use the heavy duty plugs. Some people manage to find a tire shop that will put an internal patch on a motorcycle tire, but they are hard to find.

A new rear tire will probably cost you around $150 on sale. You might even do a little better if you shop around online. If you have the tools or can borrow them or get a knowledgeable friend to help, remove the wheel yourself and bring it into the shop, it is usually about $30 for mounting and balancing. You should learn how to do this anyway if you don't already know how, because if you keep riding this will probably not be your last puncture. (You will also have to adjust the chain tension when you replace the wheel, and this is good to know how to do as well.) Call around to find a shop that will mount a tire that you bought elsewhere, some shops will not do it or will charge much more. If you have them do all the work the cost probably will be at least twice that, I don't really know because I always have pulled the wheel myself. You can also mount your own tires, it isn't all that hard and there are videos on the web that show you how.
 

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Well, I just bought a 2005 sv650s 4 days ago and went for a ride tonight and somehow, ran over a key and it went straight through my rear tire. Now my question is whether to patch it or get a new tire. I've done some searching, and it goes half and half to get a new tire vs patching it BUT thats usually for screws or nails. I had a key go through the tire, so its not exactly a small hole... My current situation is that since I just bought the bike, insurance, registration, I have almost no money left. I might be able to buy a new tire, but it depends on how much they run, its a bit too late to call around, but I just wanted some options and thoughts regarding how safe it would be to patch this. The bike isnt here, so I dont know what tire I currently have on there, but theres quite a lot of tread left. if you suggest a new tire, could you give me some options? Im new to riding, so Im basically a beginner. my current budget ~$120
How old is the tire? Where did the key go through it (middle, on the edge, though the sidewall)? Give us a picture to work with, please.

I would be inclined to plug or patch it. Depending upon the age of the tire, and where in the tire the hole is.
 

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Depends on what you plan to do with your bike. In my case I rode around neighborhood streets for a long while learning slow speed maneuvering before anything else.

If this is the case and you find that a worm plug (Slime kit at Walmart is a good cheap kit) holds the pressure in your tire (check it before you ride each time) then I wouldn't worry about it until you can replace it.

All of that said, chances are the above is not your plan. It happened that way for me, but it wasn't my choice.

If you do intend to take it up to relatively high speeds I think you should just wait and replace it. That way if you bin it right out the gate like me you'll know it was all you and not the equipment. :p
 

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If the hole is in the "meat" of the tire (not the sidewalls or anything), I'd be inclined to patch it. I recently went on a ~2000 mile road trip with my friend and he did it on a patched tire, with semi-aggressive riding and weighed down with luggage. No problems. He's probably put another 2000 miles on it outside of the road trip too. He just has one of the gummy worm patches in it.

More than likely, if the patch doesn't work, the tire will slowly deflate. Do the patch and let it sit over night and see if it's holding pressure. Also, if it does go flat while you're riding, it certainly won't make your day any more pleasant, but it's not like you're going to suddenly high side or something. You can ride on the flat far enough to pull over to the shoulder or even limp it to a service station. I would invest in a AMA membership ($50) so you can call to get your bike towed if something ever goes wrong.
 

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If you are going to replace the rear it isn't that hard to do the work yourself. Are you comfotable doing basic work shuch as changing oil and plugs? There are some good threads on the subject here. If you have the space and the tools consider this. Further, if you change your profile to show where you live, a member might have a decent take off rear you could have. (I have a set of "rim protectors" I'm trying to unload)
 

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...Further, if you change your profile to show where you live, a member might have a decent take off rear you could have...
+1 I think I have a old rear tire on it's last legs that you could use til the funds for a new one are available, but definitely not worth shipping it.
 

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As Bruce said, give up some pics for us to see. If just the shaft of the key, I, too, would be inclined to patch it. The current set of tires on my bike is the only that haven't been plugged, but that's probably because they have less than a thousand miles on them.
 

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Show us a picture but most likely a plug/patch will be fine. I've used rope plugs on every hole I've ever gotten in a motorcycle tire. I had 5 plugs in a rear Z6 at one point and I ran a few thousand miles on that tire.

If the plug holds air for 24 hours it is almost a sure bet that it is going to hold. If it does start to lose air it isn't going to be a catastrophic blow-out. Now if this hole is a gash or is located near the sidewall all of this is irrelevant and you should buy a new tire.

As Bruce said, we need a picture.
 

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While I'm usually a big proponent of the gummy worm or inside-the-tire patch, that's for a simple puncture. I can't see a key going through a tire without slicing through at least 1/4" or so of carcass. That's considerably more than I'd be comfortable with. I've plugged holes from screws, nails, and even an industrial-sized staple, but those all left clean, simple punctures. Sliced threads in the carcass are a different story...
 

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I always plugged tires, and never had an issue. But only if the puncture is in the middle of the tire.

But...

If you are leaning towards replacing your tire, I would get a shinko 006 rear. They are 102$ from motorcycle superstore. I run shinko's on my DRZ and have zero complaints, they are a great tire.
 

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If the hole is in the "meat" of the tire (not the sidewalls or anything), I'd be inclined to patch it. I recently went on a ~2000 mile road trip with my friend and he did it on a patched tire, with semi-aggressive riding and weighed down with luggage. No problems. He's probably put another 2000 miles on it outside of the road trip too. He just has one of the gummy worm patches in it.

More than likely, if the patch doesn't work, the tire will slowly deflate. Do the patch and let it sit over night and see if it's holding pressure. Also, if it does go flat while you're riding, it certainly won't make your day any more pleasant, but it's not like you're going to suddenly high side or something. You can ride on the flat far enough to pull over to the shoulder or even limp it to a service station. I would invest in a AMA membership ($50) so you can call to get your bike towed if something ever goes wrong.
I like this answer too. I've got the AMA membership and while I haven't had to use the roadside I think it's a worthwhile investment.

Also, he's right about the tire carcass holding it's shape should you lose pressure. It's happened to me and it wasn't a big deal. Just keep your speeds down, which you'll probably be inclined to do anyway being a new rider. Most riders don't start out riding at freeway pace. I did right after I got my endorsement, but that was because I turned down the wrong road by accident. :facepalm:
 

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Assuming the hole is relatively clean and narrow, and that it is not cutting into the sidewall, you can absolutely plug it safely and effectively. I plugged a nail hole on my old SV and road it probably another 2000 miles with zero problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well, I decided I'm going to patch it for now and that just having a patch kit would be useful. If I come across any pressure loss, then ill go buy a new tire. I'm relatively new, so I'm more just practicing then doing any intense riding. Also, its literally in the exact center of the tire...
 

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1st. I feel your pain. I just levered a new set of tires on my bike less than a 1000 miles ago. And coming home a few days ago I ran over an entire box of wood screws. Both tires about 10,000 holes in each. My case is a little different than yours, I'm definitely getting new tires.
2nd I'm in the replace it camp. A tire is $100 or so. Having someone install and balance it should still keep in under $130-140.
Now think if it fails and you dump your bike. Have you priced body work and paint lately?
 

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Assuming the hole is clean (we really need a photo), there is absolutely no reason to be worried about the tire catastrophically failing after it's been plugged. They aren't balloons.
 
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