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Discussion Starter #1
...against the chain buffer. I tightened the chain trying to stop this thinking it was just too loose, but now the chain has about 1/4" of play and that's too tight, right? Does anyone know if there is an acceptable amount of rubbing that should be going on w/the buffer? I can feel it resonate when I hug the tank w/my legs. When I look at the buffer it appears that the chain is making new grooves from rubbing. Can you help a brotha out? ???

Cliffs:
-chain rubs against buffer enough that I'm worried
-stock height, links
-no swingarm or suspension adjustments that I'm aware of

Just in case you're wondering WTH I'm talking about it's part #9 pictured below:
 

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The chain is supposed to glide along that piece of plastic (#9 shown in the drawing). Over time it will wear away and the chain will leave grooves. Make sure you adjust your chain with proper amount of slack...a 1/4 inch is way too tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So the chain should be rubbing on the buffer? Should it be rubbing enough to seemingly make new grooves?

Yeah I realize now that it's way too tight....going to adjust this weekend after the rain passes.
 

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So the chain should be rubbing on the buffer? Should it be rubbing enough to seemingly make new grooves?

Yeah I realize now that it's way too tight....going to adjust this weekend after the rain passes.
If you have that chain over-tightened its going to make deep grooves. Even at the proper slack, the chain will create wear lines.
 

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Mine does it too. From what I've found here, it is normal and when the bike is at speed, the chain does not touch if tightened correctly.
 

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Yup, supposed to be that way. It really only rubs badly when your coasting, with rider mounted and suspension compressed there is less pressure on it, and even less when there is throttle present because the top side of the chain is the one with the tension on it so it takes even more pressure off the chain slider.
 

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"the drive chain should be adjusted for 20-30 millimeters, or .8 - 1.2 inches of slack."

straight from the owner's manual.
 

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If you think about it, it's not as bad as it seems. And yes, that slipper/guide is designed to be a rubbing block for the chain.

Notice that the chain slipper has a raised center? That's so it fits between the side plates of the chain, and the chain rollers *roll* over it. So, the side plates of the chain will only wear the the slipper so far, and then the rollers will contact the rib ... and the rate of wear will slow down significantly.

If your slipper (especially the center rib) is wearing rapidly, that could mean that your chain has one or more broken rollers in it, or you may have a lot of road grit in your chain.

Hope this helps,
.. Gregg
 

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The only thing I would be wondering about is power and fuel economy... OK sure it wouldn't rob much power... but I wonder that little bit of drag, how much would that impact fuel economy...


personally I don't care so much as long as my bike is getting 45+mpg but it makes me wonder if that drag makes any difference
Probably less than the drag your tires make on the cement.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
that's why I love this place....so much knowledge it's amazing ;D

Thanks guys! I will adjust to the correct slack on the chain and not give it another thought...I did notice that I felt it when I was coast moreso than when I was giving it throttle
 

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When the chain is pulling the bike it is not rubbing. The top run of chain is tight. As mentioned above, it only rubs when decelerating, particularly under engine braking.
 

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The only thing I would be wondering about is power and fuel economy... OK sure it wouldn't rob much power... but I wonder that little bit of drag, how much would that impact fuel economy...


personally I don't care so much as long as my bike is getting 45+mpg but it makes me wonder if that drag makes any difference
As has been mentioned, when rider is on bike, and throttle is going, the chain isn't touching the buffer at all. Buffer is only there to protect the swingarm from when you're rolling the bike around the garage, lubing the chain, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
okay, so tell me this, is the chain supposed to touch @ all when I'm on the bike...b/c it is
 
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