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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for all of you that have moved your bikes cross-country - I will be moving states in the future, and at the moment looks like PODs are going to be the choice means to move all our belongings. The bike will have to be moved as well, I won't be able to ride it since I'll be driving my car.

There is some confusion regarding the rules for PODs but it seems that as long as the motorcycle is drained of at least gas (and maybe other fluids?) it should be OK to put it inside a POD. My plan is to fabricate a pallet, tie the bike down with ratcheting straps to it, put in wheel chocks on, drain the gas and... well that's it. It will be in a POD for a couple of weeks and traveling while it's hot, if that matters.

Can anyone who has done this before offer any insight or tips? I am a bit concerned about draining the fuel system completely of gas and letting it bake in f100+ for two weeks, but I assume it should be fine? I have some vague notion about pump and rubber gas lines needing to be immersed in gas to prevent damage from drying out, but I am probably mixing things here.

Would appreciate advice!
 

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If you leave the suspension completely snubbed down for that long, I think the springs might not recover.
I've always thought I'd Put a bunch of dry ice in and let it push out some of the air, but I've never tried it.
Check with your homeowner's insurance about coverage en route. Most will write a supplemental for you.
I lost a bunch or money in a moving fire, so I'm a bit paranoid :naughty:
 

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Holy crap, a moving fire? Mind elaborating as to how that happened? That's a whole new fear I didn't want to have :hiding:

And what about homeowner's insurance for moving? Wouldn't the bike be covered under its own policy within the Comprehensive coverage?

Didn't realize having the springs compressed might damage them either, can anyone chime in with this? So many more questions.
 

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Holy crap, a moving fire? Mind elaborating as to how that happened? That's a whole new fear I didn't want to have :hiding:

And what about homeowner's insurance for moving? Wouldn't the bike be covered under its own policy within the Comprehensive coverage?

Didn't realize having the springs compressed might damage them either, can anyone chime in with this? So many more questions.
When you strap the front down you don't want to bottom the suspension. Make it snug, but stop about 1/2 from bottoming.

The only time that can be a problem is if you hit a major bump and the straps go slack momentarily and the hooks release. Just make sure that can't happen or use straps with a closed hook on the ends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When you strap the front down you don't want to bottom the suspension. Make it snug, but stop about 1/2 from bottoming.

The only time that can be a problem is if you hit a major bump and the straps go slack momentarily and the hooks release. Just make sure that can't happen or use straps with a closed hook on the ends.
Gotcha, that's a good tip! So just to clairfy, compressing suspension for a couple of weeks generally shouldn't wreck it, correct? I was planning on using the hook straps, but I have a bunch of the ones that are a continuous loop so might use those instead to be extra sure.

Any thoughts on the wheel chocks from Harbor Freight? I was planning on using those when I make the pallet to strap the bike to; https://www.harborfreight.com/solid-rubber-wheel-chock-96479.html
 

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you may have an easier (and cheaper) time just sending it through uship with a motorcycle transport co. cause the amount of work you're doing, and then having it bounce around on the truck...
or just buy a cheapie trailer and tow it behind the car
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
you may have an easier (and cheaper) time just sending it through uship with a motorcycle transport co. cause the amount of work you're doing, and then having it bounce around on the truck...
or just buy a cheapie trailer and tow it behind the car
Since I am moving all of our belongings via PODs the cost is already amortized, the bike would just be another freight item.

Shipping companies/trailer are backup options that I am also exploring, but I'd prefer to just throw it in the pod along with other belongings and not have to deal with extra costs and logistics of shipping it separately or towing it.
 

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fair. just... risky in my opinion.
probably should build a crate around it too so that nothing else tumbles into it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
fair. just... risky in my opinion.
probably should build a crate around it too so that nothing else tumbles into it
Which is why I want all your guys opinion - the more info about upsides/downsides the better! What are the risks you are thinking of?

And yeah, a cage/crate is a good point, I'll probably build some kind of framework and throw a couple of moving blankets over it under the cover. The bike itself is an '05 with lowish miles and suspension mods, so while it's a ton of fun to ride and is modded the way I want, it isn't worth a ton. It's just that moving it is a much smaller hassle then selling and then replacing it, and I don't want to spend a 1/4 of what it's worth moving it either.
 

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pods get loaded onto bouncy trucks, unloaded, moved around warehouses, then loaded again, etc. contents get a nice good shaking. so the contents will definitely go all over the place.

one thing to consider is asking your local dealer for a bike crate... they may trash them or scrap them. or maybe sell them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
pods get loaded onto bouncy trucks, unloaded, moved around warehouses, then loaded again, etc. contents get a nice good shaking. so the contents will definitely go all over the place.
Do people experience a lot of breakage moving stuff in those usually? Just trying to get a baseline here, since furniture with mirrors, a TV and other stuff will be packed in there too...

one thing to consider is asking your local dealer for a bike crate... they may trash them or scrap them. or maybe sell them.
That's an ace idea, in fact I have dealer not too far and have some rapport with the service guys, so I'll definitely ask. Thanks!
 

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no idea on breakage of household stuff. i'm just thinking of a bike in a shipping container vs my own trailer.
 

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A crate wouldn't be a bad idea. Even if the bike was secured, there's always the possibility of something banging around and damaging it.

Holding the suspension down for a period of time isn't a problem, it's just being tied down too solidly that could cause damage if the ride gets rough.

Not sure that the HF wheel chock will work for you. You may want more of a loop than just a stop. I have a roll-on front wheel chock from Cycle Gear (https://www.cyclegear.com/accessori...MIkev2g_6d4QIVhbjACh0BVgWwEAQYASABEgIWivD_BwE) that I think might would work well and is very handy to have just for working on the bike. Especially handy to have if you need to get the bike on a rear stand by yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A crate wouldn't be a bad idea. Even if the bike was secured, there's always the possibility of something banging around and damaging it.

Holding the suspension down for a period of time isn't a problem, it's just being tied down too solidly that could cause damage if the ride gets rough.

Not sure that the HF wheel chock will work for you. You may want more of a loop than just a stop. I have a roll-on front wheel chock from Cycle Gear (https://www.cyclegear.com/accessori...MIkev2g_6d4QIVhbjACh0BVgWwEAQYASABEgIWivD_BwE) that I think might would work well and is very handy to have just for working on the bike. Especially handy to have if you need to get the bike on a rear stand by yourself.
Yes, things banging around would definitely be a concern, so I will certainly look into either getting or making a crate for it. Good point! The wheel chock you linked is a good one but seems like a bit of overkill. I'll look into it, but the current (budget) plan is to get the ones from HF and just add two boards on either side to create the U-shape. Cheap quick and dirty.

Good to know about the suspension, I'll be sure to tie it down with some travel left in the suspension and securing the tie-downs from undoing if they go slack.

Does anyone have any opinions on fully draining the gas? That shouldn't hurt the injection system if it's dry for a couple of weeks in the warm weather, should it?
 

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Do people experience a lot of breakage moving stuff in those usually? Just trying to get a baseline here, since furniture with mirrors, a TV and other stuff will be packed in there too
I used the Uhaul equivalent, eight-foot cubes. I loaded one ton into each of ten cubes.
I had no damage of any kind! It all depends on how it's packed though :naughty:

I have moved several bikes (and one dissassembled airplane) without incident.
I used a harbor freight chock mounted to a thick piece of plywood.
https://www.harborfreight.com/1800-lb-capacity-motorcycle-standwheel-chock-61670.html
I used about a dozen long drywall screws through predrilled holes into the floor of the box.
You get in trouble for big holes, but these screws make holes of less than 1/8 "
 

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The wheel chock you linked is a good one but seems like a bit of overkill. I'll look into it, but the current (budget) plan is to get the ones from HF and just add two boards on either side to create the U-shape. Cheap quick and dirty.
There are other similar chocks out there for less that can be mounted securely. HF has one I'm sure.

Once you have one you will appreciate how nice they are for doing regular maintenance. Not as cheap as the rubber bumper, but would be of use later.
 

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If you want an inexpensive way to tie the front down without crushing your springs or blowing a fork seal, just do this.
Remove the front fender. Get a chunk of 2X4 and wedge it up between the front tire and the bottom of the triple clamp. Ratchet it down tight against the wood. They make plastic versions of this for dirt bikes.

MAd
 

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I would reconsider to use POD.
Once i bought bike in Florida and needed to get it to Philly, used AirForward, they have special shipping containers for bikes, theres only your bike inside, you strap it, drain gas + oil, use your padlocks and than pick it up at final destinaton.
If its me i wouldnt want my bike shipped wih any other stuff in same container.
Just another taught.....
 
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