Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
...and the last conclusion was "If you're in the market for an entry-level sportbike, you won't be disappointed."

why are we still "entry level"?

i "entered" on a Suzuki Savage 650 thumper. rode it for 2 years in college. then i bought a ZRX1200r...while lusting after an S-model SV for years. i only bought the Z-rex because i was young. i wanted power, and that muscle-bike status. after screwing around, and foolishly crashing the zrx several times, i thought to myself, "man...i should have settled for an SV!" after sitting out of the bike scene for 2 years, i was finally able to get another bike...my 007 SV. and i couldn't be happier! i wish i had never messed around with bigger, more powerful bikes. i am so happy with the SV. it has the perfect balance of everything one needs. i am starting to get faster and more confident on my bike. that doesn't mean that i am ready to "graduate" to a 600ss bike. it only means that i am ready to improve and match the suspension to my riding style. by constantly learning from my bike, and improving/modifying my bike, i never get bored. i love you SV!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
I just read that too... also saw that they have a 600 Katana again..lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Now dont get me wrong I subscribe to "Motorcyclist". But lately like say the past year or so the magazine has turned into a brochure to buy a DUCATI. Any model doesnt matter they have had a DUC on the cover at least 6 of the last 12 months. Gettin back to the discussion. I think they consider anything below a 750cc a beginner bike. Personally I just consider bigger bikes quicker ways to kill yourself. My bike goes plenty fast enough for me. Not tryin to break the soundbarrier. Just cruisin along starin at the scenery
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,830 Posts
They just don't get it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
How could the SV NOT be a entry level bike? It's made with budget parts and has had relatively little development since its introduction. Not sayings it's a bad thing, but it is true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
How could the SV NOT be a entry level bike? It's made with budget parts and has had relatively little development since its introduction. Not sayings it's a bad thing, but it is true.
X2, it has all entry level components as far as brakes and suspension are concerned, which lowers the price and makes it entry level. Doesn't mean it sucks, just means it isn't the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Even if it is an entry level bike I know all of us love out SV's. Many of the people that I have talked to learned on an SV and still would love to have one again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I started riding may of last year with zero and i mean ZERO street bike expirience, no "let me drive it down your driveway and back" and i dont plan on getting another bike till im either well off enough to buy a second bike(cruiser probably) or crash and seriously hurt myself. I know for a fact almost everyone that knows a bit about this bike compared to others, is that this bike is a GREAT entry level bike and a GREAT all around bike! Nothing about super sports or cruisers ooze the amount this bike can offer for either its price, or its all around greatness.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Entry level for skill, or price? The SV is pretty forgiving of newb stupidity, even if some of it's fans on SVR are not. But it is powerful enough I would be very hesitant to recommend it to someone who has not ridden on the street before if I questioned their maturity and skill level.

Granted, it's not a hair trigger weapon of mass destruction that will tolerate nothing less than perfection from it's rider, say like a ZX1000R or a 1098. It's not an extreme exercise in purpose or styling like a Hypermotard, a 1200GS, a Gold Wing, A CBR, or a M80. It's not disposable like a GZ250 or a Super Sherpa (that's true entry level IMO.) It's a well balanced budget bike with sporty characteristics but no extreme bias towards any one style of riding. It excels at nothing, but does a better than fair job at almost any task you ask of it, allowing you to see what style of riding you wish to pursue later on.

For those of you who bemoan the lack of horsepower, suspension and braking on your SV, please go find an older (pre 99) sport bike that is well maintained and in good shape and go ride it. Hard. Then come back and tell me that Suzuki didn't do a great job balancing the "cheap" components on your SV. I honestly think that too many are jaded by the hype and excessive superlatives of the moto-media such as Motorcyclist and MCN and the testosterone driven boasts at Friday night hangouts. The SV is a good multi purpose platform.Nothing more, nothing less. But it is so well balanced, many of us are unwilling to give up it's utility when we grow beyond what it can offer in stock form. Therefore we add better brakes, suspension, tinker with the internals, etc.

Entry Level? Not in my eyes. It is the perfect re-entry or second bike, for those of us who dabbled in the hobby as foolish youth, left for a decade or two, and decided to come back when we we were a little wiser, more responsible, and had a whole lot more sense about us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
How could the SV NOT be a entry level bike? It's made with budget parts and has had relatively little development since its introduction. Not sayings it's a bad thing, but it is true.
Those parts make it a BUDGET bike, not an entry-level bike. "Entry level" is what you give someone with zero experience that just finished an MSF course. In more sane times, that would be a good 250 or 350 twin...MAYBE a 500 if they were a big person. Something that had a comfortable riding "sweet spot" of performance at or under most speed limits, with performance that wouldn't endanger a ham-fisted beginner.

Entry-level is something where people can learn real-world riding skills with light weight, sane speeds, and idiot-friendly control responses. Good Entry-level bikes can still have the best components of their era.

Someone who doesn't know what they're doing could still loop out or endo an SV with excessive throttle, hard brake use or some other stupid response, and they can do it at performance levels that "entry level" bikes shouldn't reach.

I'm very glad that I started on the street with a CB350 twin, followed by multiple sub-500 two-strokes, then a CB750 before getting into the modern performance envelope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
My entry level bike was also a CB350... last year! (See avatar) I completely rebuilt it, which I think being able to work on your motorcycle any size type, is important. I love my SV. It serves all my needs right now. Entry level... I don't agree with that. JMO. Bye, going riding :fiddy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Also a subscriber to Motorcyclist. I like the publication.

Don't worry about the 'entry level' comments. I don't understand why it bothers some. We all know it's a respectable and entertaining mount. I would rather keep those in the know a minority.

Don't really care what others think of it. Not many can outride the SV's capabilities, including some on the staff of the MC rags we read.

As a cyclist of 20+ years, I can appreciate the SV for what it is and its capabilities. Having owned quite a few SS bikes previously, I can honestly say, I would rather have the SV. Most of my 'mature' (non newb) biker buds, are looking for an SV or similar for a rational and fun street bike.

I've owned the SV for almost 6 years. (unheard of for me.) I can't bring myself to part with this bike. Unfortunately I don't have the room for >1 bike. (darn kids and their toys/crap.)


Just read the sig...............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
Wow Magpie, that is a great post.

This bike has an excellent power to weight ratio. Has better roll on times than most bikes in it's class. It has a GREAT engine, and a great frame. And, it's pretty **** inexpensive for what you get. Want to be superstar track racer? Just throw some money at the suspension (which, BTW, is PERFECTLY FINE fine for normal, SANE street riding). It's easily one of the most track ridden bikes in the country. I just don't get all the entry level BS. Only in America. It's a mid-level bike, period. In the UK you can only start with 33 BHP when you first get your license. And you have to ride the 33 BHP for 2 years before you can "graduate" to the power of the "entry level" SV. And quite honestly, based on all the squids I see on 600cc-1000cc sportbikes that shouldn't be on the street on a Ninja 250 let alone a Supersport, I wish America had the same requirements. This thing is faster from 0-60 than 98% of the cars on the road. I'd venture a guess that it's faster from 0-100 than 90%. Be honest with yourself, it's not about how much power you want to accelerate in a straight line... honestly ask yourself "How much power do you REALLY need on the street?" Less than an SV650, that's for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Someone who doesn't know what they're doing could still loop out or endo an SV with excessive throttle, hard brake use or some other stupid response, and they can do it at performance levels that "entry level" bikes shouldn't reach.
Someone who doesn't know what that doing can do the same on an "entry level" bike as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I bought my '03 SV1000S in '05. I had ZERO riding experience. I LEARNED on my SV. It was the best thing I could have bought, although I didn't know it at the time. I just bought it because it was a great deal, and I liked the color. (two years old, with a Corbin seat, full M4 exhaust and fifteen hundred miles for $5,500.00)
THAT was an entry level price.
I think that a lot of people consider anything that is NOT a four cylinder to be a beginner bike. Someone was telling me just the other day that I should grow a pair and step up to a 'LiterBike'...He rides a '92 CBR900RR...???
The reason I will not be 'stepping up' anytime soon is because of the visual impact of my SV. There are some guys at my workplace who ride bikes that are technically superior to mine. But they look 'dated'. No one who is not familiar with the SV would guess that my bike is six years old. A gently modded SV is EYE CANDY.
The only thing I wish Suzuki had spent more money on was the black, rusty rear head-pipe. Otherwise, I am totally happy with my 'beginner bike'. :)
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top