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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been a professional web engineer for 15 years, and I've built a dozen computers from components, but I have next to no skills as a 'handyman' as it were. I looked up the instructions to the TPS mod and while the instructions were clear and simple, I fear that I'm going to ruin my bike if I even attempt to mess with the electronics (mainly the 'dealer switch' tool thing).

Can I ask my dealer to make the TPS mod, or do they usually not do that?

Are there any mods that I can make that have little to no risk of hurting my bike due to my own ineptitude?

I ride a completely stock 2008 SV650SA(F?) ABS, Suzuki seems to no longer have the details page up for this model, but here's a pic of the exact bike I have:
http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/photos/2008models/2008-Suzuki-SV650Fb.jpg

I have looked at the many threads that offer lists of mods, such as the TPS mod (or maintenance rather than mod, if you prefer), motosliders, suspension, etc. But as I'm coming from no technical automotive/mororcycle experience, it's difficult to know which parts I should buy (For example, I've read that because I have a Gen II, I shouldn't go with the R6 throttle tube mod)

I suppose the essence of what I'm asking is this:
What are some mods that offer increased performance or riding enjoyment or enhanced aesthetics (visual or audible) that I can make without risking damage to my bike and where can I procure the items unnecessary that are proper for my bike?

Edit: I am 6'2" and 200-210lbs
 

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- Get some frame sliders. They'll save you some money when your bike goes down. Motosliders are the most popular here.

In my opinion, the next two are affordable mods that increased my enjoyability of the riding experience.
- Check out an aTRE. One of the board members makes a nice plug n play version for a fair price (http://www.svrider.com/forum/showthread.php?t=95450)

- I have a Gen II with the R6 throttle tube installed. It's fun and works.

A lot of people also look at upgrading the front and back suspension. I'd recommend riding the bike for a while first then see if you need/want to upgrade.

Visual / aesthetic enhancements are really up to you. The rule of thumb though is that such add-ons should not be considered when pricing the bike should you decide you want to sell it.

Whatever you decide, you want to do for upgrades, the best advice I received after I purchased my bike and started thinking about modifications was to just ride the damn thing and enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
- Get some frame sliders. They'll save you some money when your bike goes down. Motosliders are the most popular here.
Any chance you can refer me to a specific merchant or part number, so I don't pick the wrong one?

In my opinion, the next two are affordable mods that increased my enjoyability of the riding experience.
- Check out an aTRE. One of the board members makes a nice plug n play version for a fair price (http://www.svrider.com/forum/showthread.php?t=95450)
I'll check that out, thanks

- I have a Gen II with the R6 throttle tube installed. It's fun and works.
Can you point me to where you purchased it? Part number, etc... again, I have looked at them, but there were several different options and I'm just not familiar enough yet to know what is suitable for my bike.

A lot of people also look at upgrading the front and back suspension. I'd recommend riding the bike for a while first then see if you need/want to upgrade.

Visual / aesthetic enhancements are really up to you. The rule of thumb though is that such add-ons should not be considered when pricing the bike should you decide you want to sell it.

Whatever you decide, you want to do for upgrades, the best advice I received after I purchased my bike and started thinking about modifications was to just ride the damn thing and enjoy it.
Thank you very much for your reply.
I bought the bike brand new in 2008, but it's the only street bike I've ever ridden, so I don't have a frame of reference for determining my preference with regard to suspension. What are the signs of an inadequate suspension?
 

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I've found that you can tap into the impressive knowledge here at SVRider by going to get togethers like maintenance days or wrench fests. I've had my suspension (front and back) cheaply upgraded; crash repairs made and I've assisted a few others in things like cam swaps and valve checks. ("Assisted" is used loosley in this context.)

Useful mods include suspension upgrades, which can be cheap or quite expensive, depending on what hardware you choose. But suspensions are pretty much straightforward mechanical assemblies, and there are a lot of "How-I-(swapped-my-forks)(installed-a-Kawi-shock)( installed-emulators)( etc.) threads. Brake lines are also a popular upgrade, and as with suspensions, there are no "black box" components involved. So, with a sufficient tool supply and enough beer, you can tackle quite a few mods, even on your own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've found that you can tap into the impressive knowledge here at SVRider by going to get togethers like maintenance days or wrench fests. I've had my suspension (front and back) cheaply upgraded; crash repairs made and I've assisted a few others in things like cam swaps and valve checks. ("Assisted" is used loosley in this context.)
That sounds awesome, but I live in a pretty small town, and I've not heard of any meetups like that in my area (Grants Pass, Oregon) -- is there a list or public calendar or something I can look at?
 

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You can do the TBS adjustment. You won't mess it up. Just take your time. you can do it

And if it hasn't been adjusted in a while you will notice a big difference in the lower rpms after you finish
 

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I agree with the Motosliders - cheap insurance. Next would be tires IMO - big improvements in handling and safety.

Because of your size, suspension would be the next place to go. Get a set of Sonic Springs (vendor here) with the proper rate your your size and riding style for the front and an upgraded rear shock.

After you have those done, you could go for a slip-on and some other cosmetic mods.
 

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I too have little mechanical/automotive experience. You will find that there is a wealth of knowledge throughout the forums here! I have an aTRE on the way as well as an R6 throttle tube for my 2005 and those will be my first mods/customizations. I have some bar-end mirrors that I still need to install yet. Framesliders, tires and fender eliminator are next on the list. This SV thing is becoming an expensive hobby :rock:

There are local and regional forums on here. Check them out for group rides/events/riding classes. They are a good resource.

I have yet to meet up with any SVR members, but poke in and out of the local forum a bit. Hoping to meet some of the MN/WI crew sometime soon though.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

In general, reversible mods are the best. Some things to consider:

Are the control levers and pedals all properly adjusted to fit you?

Do you still have the original tires on the bike? An upgrade to PR2's or PR3's might be a good first step.

Is the bike's maintenance up to schedule? Do you have a factory service manual?

Are you comfortable with the stock seat?

Frame sliders are an easy addition, and can more than pay for themselves with even a minor mishap.

How much have you spent on rider education? David L Hough's Proficient Motorcycling is a good start, but there are a number of good books and videos out there. A professional skills class would also usually be a better investment than bike upgrades.

Is your gear adequate and current? Good riding/protective gear should be a higher priority than spending money on the bike.

Just out of curiosity, what is a validatorian?
 

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I'm a computer engineer with history in build and running a plethora of different types of systems, so I know where you're coming from with your hesitance.

However, I guarantee you that if you find a way to break your bike, all you have to do is make one post and we'll tell you how to put it back together. The two key things are:
  1. Find the Factory Service Manual on this website (or at least the link to it) and download it. If you are doing any service or need to know any specifics, this is literally the book that taught your mechanic how to do it right the first time. A Q6600 still goes into an LGA 775 socket, right? Well, That T27 Security Torx bit fits right on those two TPS screws.
  2. Read SVR, search SVR, and read some more. I sold the bike a year ago and I'm still finding new things I could have done to it, and the SV hasn't even been sold in Suzuki's US lineup in the last three years!

Seriously, get modding, as it is the only way you'll learn any of those skills you lack. I had a Ninja 250 as a first bike; loved the thing but never knew enough or needed to mod it. I got the SV, found this site, and within a few months I was able to pull everything but the engine off the frame for anything from cleaning to doing the mod du jour. I'm pretty sure if I had kept it I would have performed my own valve check as well as fixed or replaced my gas level indicator by now.
 

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As has been stated, for a guy your size, suspension upgrades are practically a must. This has nothing to do with making the bike race worthy- too many people think that if a bike has springs that move on both ends, it has adequate suspension. The truth is that unless the springs (both up front and out back) are adequate to your weight, and the damping is appropriate to the springs, they you've got a bike that doesn't handle as well as it should.

You learn to ride around the suspension's inadequacies. When I bought my first SV (a '99) I noticed that the front end seemed harsh- in a bumpy turn the handlebars would jackhammer over bumps and the bike seemed to drift wide of where I wanted to go. Posting on an early forum (the old sporttwin.net list server) that was largely populated by racers I learned that the stock springs were appropriate for a 135 lb rider, and that the stock fork oil was junk. Draining the fork oil revealed stuff that resembled rusty water- this on a bike that was only a few months old. Simply changing the fork oil made a dramatic improvement in how the front end behaved- with adequate damping the front end was actually controlled, and the front tire was no longer skipping from bump to bump but instead actually maintaining contact with the asphalt and traction- the bike now went where it was pointed! Changing out the springs likewise made a huge improvement, with the front end no longer diving under braking and giving far better feedback through the bars, which in turn increased my confidence and improved my riding.

None of this stuff is particularly difficult to do, and there are plenty of step-by-step illustrated instructions on the web and from the folks who will sell you suspension components. And if you do get in too deep, just post a few photos of where you're stuck and there will be plenty of people who will help you out.

That's my $0.03 worth, anyway.
 

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Here's a R6 mod write up from a member http://canyonchasers.net/shop/sv/R6-throttle.php.

The part number listed in the write up is: 5SL-26240-01-00

I recently purchased one from a online boat store (of all places) http://www.boats.net/parts/detail/yamaha/Y-5SL-26240-01-00.html.

Additionally, there are several threads on the forum covering the topic, try this one to get going:
http://www.svrider.com/forum/showthread.php?t=138900

This site has TONS of great information. Use the google site search feature or at google.com enter

svrider.com: whatever you want to search for

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Welcome to the forum.

In general, reversible mods are the best. Some things to consider:

Are the control levers and pedals all properly adjusted to fit you?
Thanks, glad to be here!

I haven't adjusted these, I'll look into what the proper location and placement is for my riding style, thanks for the suggestion.

Do you still have the original tires on the bike? An upgrade to PR2's or PR3's might be a good first step.
What benefits do the PR2 and PR3 tires offer over stock? This is one area that I'm very unfamiliar with...

Is the bike's maintenance up to schedule? Do you have a factory service manual?
Just got it serviced a month ago or so, asked the mechanic to just do whatever regular maintenance was required for safety and upkeep of the bike,because it had been sitting for a year without much use. The mechanic said I don't need another for a few years.

Are you comfortable with the stock seat?
More or less, I suppose. I could certainly be more comfortable, but I'm not sure what the options are... I get the feeling that I should try out some other bikes so I can see what I like best. Any recommendations for being able to test-drive other bikes/configurations?

Frame sliders are an easy addition, and can more than pay for themselves with even a minor mishap.
Yea, those seem like a logical first step -- I just need to find the right one to use, which is daunting in itself.

How much have you spent on rider education? David L Hough's Proficient Motorcycling is a good start, but there are a number of good books and videos out there. A professional skills class would also usually be a better investment than bike upgrades.
Before I started riding, I did my due diligence as far as it came to riding safety and properly. I also practiced on the DMV motorcycle test for a few months before taking my exam so I could ensure I had the basics down. I'll check that out though, it certainly couldn't hurt to get more education :)

Is your gear adequate and current? Good riding/protective gear should be a higher priority than spending money on the bike.
I've got a nice helmet (shoei rf1000), some nice protective gloves from alpine star and a protective riding jacket from fieldsheer. What else would you recommend? It's currently very hot, so I don't always wear the jacket -- is there anything that is more comfortable for driving in the heat?

Just out of curiosity, what is a validatorian?
"Valid", because I'm a standards evangelist, who conforms to the web development standards as set by the W3C. I 'validate' my codes to their standards.

"-atorian" because I'm an expert and 'top of my class' as it were in the area of semantic, standard coding practices (as an invited expert to the W3C HTML and CSS working groups)
 

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I just need to find the right one to use,
You're not listening


MOTOSLIDERS!!!!!!!

is there anything that is more comfortable for driving in the heat?
Have you checked out textile mesh jackets?
 

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