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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone lowered an SV650s? Some say it's bad for the bike to lower it/bad for handling etc. Any difference?
 

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It reduces ground clearance and can have negative effects on handling depending on how it's done/whether the front end is also lowered.

Usually if someone's looking to lower a bike just so they can flat foot vs tippy toe, I personally recommend they either look into a thinner/shaved seat or just do their best to get used to it (there aren't many scenarios where one really needs two feet flat footed anyway).

What sort of footwear are you using when riding? Motorcycle boots have pretty thick soles and help with touching.
 

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Has anyone lowered an SV650s? Some say it's bad for the bike to lower it/bad for handling etc. Any difference?
If you lower the bike 1" ride height in the rear, you need to compensate by lowering the forks the same amount in the triple to keep the same trail. If you have stock forks this will probably result in the forks bottoming out. I have 0.8 kg/mm spring and the cheap emulators and have not had a problem. I lowered the rear by using an 08 GSXR rear shock (9.4 kg/mm spring rate vs 9.2 kg/mm stock on 1st gen)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well, I'm not that short or anything I just would feel more confident having my foot totally flat on the ground. at the moment I'm just on the balls of my feet. I know it's not too bad but i had a few sticky situations when for instance I had to reverse backwards and my foot slipped.
 

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I'm short and if I have to back up the bike and I can't, then I just get off the bike and push it back. Saves me the aggravation of lowering the bike and changing it's performance. I've already shaved the seat and am on the balls of my feet too.
 

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well, I'm not that short or anything I just would feel more confident having my foot totally flat on the ground. at the moment I'm just on the balls of my feet. I know it's not too bad but i had a few sticky situations when for instance I had to reverse backwards and my foot slipped.
Personally, I think you just need to get use to it. I am short and I have to tip-toe when I am on my cbr, and just like oneasterisk, if you have trouble backing out, just push it while off the bike.

One trick I use when I am on a tall bike and have to back out while on the bike is to yank the bike backwards as you rock it from one side to the other and repeat the motion. Just imagine you are on a kayak and try to back up with the paddle.
 

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My bike had lowering link on the rear when I got it and was in the lower position one of two, and the front was untouched.
I didnt realize it until after a few months, when I changed it to stock height because Im very tall.
The bike's turn in is easier now, not to drastic though but I like it better now.
If you want the lowering links we could maybe work out some kind of a trade

PM me if you are interested
 

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One trick I use when I am on a tall bike and have to back out while on the bike is to yank the bike backwards as you rock it from one side to the other and repeat the motion. Just imagine you are on a kayak and try to back up with the paddle.
Another trick I've used is to use the front forks as a pogo stick. Grab the front brake, push down on the forks and as it pushes back let go of the brake and let it push you back.
 

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Next time try starting a new thread instead of trying to hijack an old dead thread.

but the best way to find out is to just do it, its easy enough, doesnt cost anything.
and you can make your own opinion on how the bike handles after
 

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WTF, the dude's just asking a question in a relevant thread... and it ain't *that* old, Sheesh!

You *should* drop the front as well, dxaxrxc, but prob'ly not the same amount... maybe like 10mm if you're only going down 1/2" in the rear.
 

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The answer to your question is "it depends".
If you can push the bike fairly hard in corners without being uptight, you will notice a difference in "turn-in".
You will probably like it. If you can't, you won't.
 

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What I meant was only doing the front and not lowering the back.

I didn't want to start a new thread because I have been told to do a search first. this seemed like the right arena to ask the question. My bad.
 

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You *should* drop the front as well, dxaxrxc, but prob'ly not the same amount... maybe like 10mm if you're only going down 1/2" in the rear.
If you actually do the math, instead of relying on "probably" you'll see rear ride height changes directly correlate to fork/triple height changes. Meaning if you drop the rear ride height 1", pulling the forks 1" out of the triple will give you a net 0 change in trail.

What I meant was only doing the front and not lowering the back.

I didn't want to start a new thread because I have been told to do a search first. this seemed like the right arena to ask the question. My bad.
Stock trail isn't the end all be all. Shorter trail = faster turn-in = needs less lean angle but less stable in a straight line. Longer trail = slower turn-in = needs more lean angle but more stable in a straight line. Bikes with short trail tend to be equipped with steering dampers to offset instability. It's all relative though. Saying "less trail = less stability" doesn't mean if you go shorter than stock it'll be unstable. Just be careful and go slow with your adjustments, and do the math to understand where you're at.

I've been thinking for a while that de-tuning the suspension by increasing trail for a beginner might be a good idea (lower rear ride height). As a beginner you're going to want to ride slower, but at the same time, it's more fun to be more leaned over. Unfortunately with the stock SV geometry and going legal speeds on most roads you don't need to lean over much. This encourages you to go faster, to try and get that "thrill" of leaning over, perhaps when you shouldn't be (end up riding over your limit). With increased trail you can drive legal speeds, and still have fun leaning the bike over. Plus it's easier to get both feet on the ground, which can help a new rider feel more comfortable.


This thread wasn't so old that it's a big deal, IMO. Your post was relevant to the original topic, and a legitimate question. The problem with resurrecting threads is people read the first post and start responding to that again (when it's either been answered, or the OP is long gone), not the question you posted. It's also obnoxious when people resurrect an old thread to post a reply, often not even helpful or relevant to the topic.
 

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Your reply was perfect. That is what I needed to know. I will leave the stock settings. I feel that it turns in quickly now so I don't want to make it turn in even quicker.
 

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I didn't want to start a new thread because I have been told to do a search first. this seemed like the right arena to ask the question. My bad.
I didnt mean that you did anything wrong just thought you might be able to get more relative feedback if you started your own but it seems you got the answer you were looking for :eek:ccasion14:
 
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