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Sweet, congrats to her on the new bike.
I'm toying with the idea of a new rodie as well. The GF's bike is technically on layaway, but only because we were there past closing last night, there are some things she needs to get today, and some deals are only if you buy everything together. Also, if the trek card gets $2000+ put on it at once, it's 12 months no interest (we have the money, but might as well earn interest on it for 12 months), but under $2K, it's only 6 mo.

I'm going to try out some Scotts, and the Trek Madone 5.1. New toys are great!
 

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OK guys, new bikes. Yes, I finally splurged. The goal was 10,000 miles on the Trek 2100 for a new bike. I have 12,000 on it, so I figured why not?

First, the GF's bike...

2009 Trek 2.1 WSD (43cm). It's REALLY nice.




Now mine. I switched brands and got a 2009 Scott Addict R3, compact (56cm). The compact refers to the 50/34 tooth crankset (Ultegra SL gruppo). Better for climbing, and yes Lance, I only got the double.




I rode the Trek Madone 5.2, which was really comfortable and kicked the sh!t out of my 2100 on terms of speed. I then tried this little guy. The Madone feels like riding through sand compared to this speed demon. That, and the framset is just over 800 grams. WOOHOO!!!
 

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OOOOO very nice Joe. I like it I like it a lot. I wouldn't mind getting a new bike now. You didn't need a triple!!!
 

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OOOOO very nice Joe. I like it I like it a lot. I wouldn't mind getting a new bike now. You didn't need a triple!!!
Thanks Lance.

I'll tell you what, though. The triple was nice going up some mountain roads in NM and UT. I may have to switch to an 11-28 cassette for my next trip to UT.

I took it out for a small 7-mile ride when I got home (too late, too dark and no lights). I got my Look KEOs on it. It's just freaking fast. Flies up hills and absorbs all kinds of shock. The Madone 5.2 is really nice, but gorram it, the Scott is just phenomenal. I can't wait for a real ride. Oh, and I need to swap my Conti GP4000s to the Scott. The Hutchison tires that came with are just not my cup of tea.
 

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WHAT Hutchinsons rock. if you don't want them I'll take em' off your hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
Very nice! Both of them, congrats.
 

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Threadbump + ride report!


So I've managed to completely diss my new ride, meaning I haven't put nearly the miles on it that it wants. On Saturday, when I bought it, it was too late when I got home to ride for more than 10 miles (too dark and no lights). On Sunday I had to go out to my brother's place because of a baby dedication at his church for my niece. I didn't get home until around 6. 35 mile ride on sh!t Hutchinson Equinox tires. Lance, they suck. There is NO reason to put $25 tires on a ~$4000 bike (MSRP). Regardless of the crap tires, I managed to pull about 1 mph faster than usual... even with all the wind. SOOOOOoooooooooo much more comfortable. The bike just eats road bumps and vibrations. It is compliant over every road surface I have been on so far, yet doesn't forfeit strength and stiffness.

Hills? What hills? This thing flies like they weren't even there. You remember the Specialized commercial a few years ago (might have been Cervelo) where the cyclist is looking down the road and all the hills flatten? Yeah, it's like that. It's just so stiff that every action on the pedals is converted into forward motion.

The Shimano Ultegra compact crankset is just like butter. I love it. The only thing that is going to take some getting used to is the 16T drop from the big ring to the small. Coming from the triple (52/42/30) is a big change for me even though I hardly used the granny gear.

The biggest change for me, however, is going from the 54cm size of my Trek to the 56cm size of my Scott. The Scott also has a slightly longer stem, thinner bars and is quite a bit taller. I have more of a stretch and more of a drop with the Scott, yet I am 100% more comfortable... even on the stock saddle. It just feels like I have more room to breathe, my arms are less tired and my lower back isn't cramping whatsoever.

So that was Sunday. I can't actually remember if I road on Monday. I got my stitches out, and I don't think I rode because the weather wasn't too agreeable. OH YEAH! I remember now. I was busy trying to teach the GF how to operate her bike. She hasn't really ridden for ~15 years and never learned to operate hand-brakes and shifters, so I hooked her bike up to the trainer and had her spin while paracticing shifting. She's getting it.

I also took those Hutchinson tires off and put the Conti GP4000s on. Took that out on Tues. I have a 10-mile loop that I take for speed work. Rolling hills and low traffic. With the Conti tires on, I averaged about 2 mph faster than I would on my Trek.

The Trek will be going up for sale soon. It's definitely a good bike, but I don't imagine I'll be riding it again soon.

The Scott is just a fantastic bike. The Conti tires make it perform like it should. No regrets whatsoever, with one exception. Why didn't I do this earlier?
 

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Just bought my first set of bib shorts. Why the hell didn't I do that earlier?? I'm going back tomorrow for 1 or 2 more pair. They're the Bontrager Race X Lite, the same Team Astana wears (without the advertising, of course). Probably the most comfortable shorts I've had in 5 years of road biking. My local bike shop is selling them for $119, off of $169. I can't even find that price on ebay.
 

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Just bought my first set of bib shorts. Why the hell didn't I do that earlier?? I'm going back tomorrow for 1 or 2 more pair. They're the Bontrager Race X Lite, the same Team Astana wears (without the advertising, of course). Probably the most comfortable shorts I've had in 5 years of road biking. My local bike shop is selling them for $119, off of $169. I can't even find that price on ebay.
bwahahahaha. Sorry couldn't help myself. Funny, my wife was just asking me on my last bike ride. Why do you use those instead of regular shorts. I'm was like, try em' and you tel me.
 

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bwahahahaha. Sorry couldn't help myself. Funny, my wife was just asking me on my last bike ride. Why do you use those instead of regular shorts. I'm was like, try em' and you tel me.
Holy shite, Lance! I didn't know what I was missing. I just didn't know.

Same thing with the carbon frame. How could a bike be so stiff, yet absorb so much shock from the road? (I know the answer, but I still am amazed)

Question... stick with Look, or switch to Time, Speedplay or Shimano?

The Look Keo Sprint comes in white...
 

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well my original stint with look was good until I headed into a final sprint and as I was really gunning the pedals I slipped out of the pedals at about 30mph as I was right next to everyone racking myself but not totally crashing. The cleats seem to wear a bit faster with the looks.

I use the Shimano pedals now. The "pantoons" they put on the ends seem to take the brunt of walking while the actual clip portion stays in tact. Also if they're good enough for Lance they're good enough for uh.....me.

Speedplay, haven't used but I've heard a lot of good things other than the release is to the side instead of a rotation of the ankle.

Time again haven't used son no input there. They were the only ones with their bolt pattern for a while I think they switched to the look pattern.

Like I said I use Shimano and have loved em' and for the price of the Ultegra vs. Dura Ace, you get top of the line quality at like half price and only a couple ounces more. Well worth it IMHO.
 

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Hmmm. Well, since I'm already used to the Look-style, why change? The Looks are about 30-40g lighter than Shimano, so no real benefit. A wider platform may give me some extra power transfer too. I like my shoes (Shimano SH-R131), so I have to stick with the 3-bolt pattern. The Look and Shimano are roughly the same price.

It seems that all I hear is fluff about how good speedplay is. Thought I'd give them a shot, but at ~$200 I may stick with what I know.
 

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Maybe you guys (Lance and silver) can give me a bit of advice and/or info about my bike. I posted it a few pages back in this thread, I believe. It's a 2005 Giant TCR T-mobile Team bike. Link Here

I know it's been modified a tad from what I can tell. The site says it comes with Shimano Dura Ace wheels, but my wheels say Bontrager Race Lite Aero on them. I'm not sure if that's an upgrade from the Dura Ace wheels or not. It also has Bontrager Race X Lite tires on it. Overall, the ride seems a bit rough for a bike that's entirely carbon fiber, though I must admit this is my first road bike. Maybe my roads are just not very smooth or maybe it's the wheels and tires that are on it. I'm not really sure.

I bought the bike without really knowing a whole lot about bikes, clearly. My good friend and roommate does a lot of biking and said it was a good deal. I bought it from a guy who works at a local bike shop for $2500 last year. Regrettably, I've only put 221 miles on the **** thing (105 of which was a bike ride for MS that I did). I really need to get back on it. I also have a question about the gearing on it. It still has the factory 10-speed 12-25T gearing from what I can tell. Is that considered a good setup for hill climbs? As I stated previously in this thread (I believe), my normal ride that I used to take was about 8 miles in each direction with about a 2500ft elevation change from the start of the ride to my turnaround point. I really enjoy hill climbs and seem to have been pretty good at it when I was riding more regularly. Any help/advice is appreciated.
 

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Tuna, I'm heading out of the office, but once I get home I can type a full reply. Until then, road bikes are pretty rough compared to anything else. What you're really concerned with is vibration and shock. CF helps dampen that quite a bit. Try riding an Al frame for several miles, your CF will feel like you're riding on a cloud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
Well since this thread veered off of pictures anyway, what is a good relatively inexpensive pedal to try for a first timer? I have NEVER used clip or clip-less pedals. I can't find a MTB in my $$ range so I bought a new stem, new bars, and a new seat post for that Schwinn on the first page.

Oops I see that picture is broken and I can't edit it anymore. Here's the Schwinn as it sits now:

 

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12-25 is a pretty solid hill set up, I think the next possible would be 13-27 which really doesn't give you much. Si I think your close to maxed. Hills are such a specific thing. I'm king of the mountains when I ride by myself but I get with a group forget about it. You have to find your rhythm. As for the wheels hmmm if it's the older Dura Ace wheels they have a specific spoke pattern which you actually benefit with the Bontrager's. I think they are pretty comparable from what I remember. The tires are like buying motorcycle tires. As Joe has said, the Conti's are sweet but when your paying 30 or 40 bucks for a bicycle tire. Another important often overlooked piece, SEAT. It's a lot of testing but if you can get some help from the local bike shop you'll find one that you like. I use Fizik saddles with carbon rails and a carbon seat post. I've got Carbon bars, my frame is Aluminum with carbon seat stays and carbon fork.
 

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I second what Lance has said, and have a few things to add. The 53/39 is a pretty standard crank. Things are moving into compact cranksets (50/34) and that is what I have. That gives you more in the climbing end. 12-25 is also pretty standard. They make an 11-28 now, which would give you better leverage for uphills, and more speed in your 53-11 (vs. 53-12). As far as being good for climbs, your legs will tell you.

The Bontrager wheels are not stock for Giant. They're owned by Trek, so you'll find them on Trek, Gary Fisher, Litespeed (I think) and Klein. They're pretty expensive too, about $320 (MSRP) each. Aero wheels are heavy because of the shape, but you're supposed to gain some better aerodynamics from them. The Bontrager are about 1775g for the set. To put that into perspective, my Mavic wheels on my new Scott are 1550g for the set. About the same price but non-aero. The Dura-Ace wheels that came on it were probably about the same price, but non-aero.

The tires are OK, but I've never been a fan. The GP 4000s that I get are around $60 per tire, but worth it IMO.

As Lance said, SADDLE. That is the most important feature on your bike, and one of the few things you NEED to buy retail. The reason is because many have trial periods (make sure you check on this, do not get a saddle without a trial period). You need to try new saddles until you come across the "right" one. Keep in min, however, that it needs to be firm and needs to support your sit-bones. If the boys or the pee-pee go numb, it's not the right saddle (make sure it's level and only make minor adjustments). Your sit-bones will probably be sore the first few weeks, that's normal. Expect to pay anywhere from $100 - $200 for a good saddle.

Get padded shorts. The road-bike lycra kind. You'll look like a dork.

Finally, just ride.
 

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12-25 is a pretty solid hill set up, I think the next possible would be 13-27 which really doesn't give you much. Si I think your close to maxed. Hills are such a specific thing. I'm king of the mountains when I ride by myself but I get with a group forget about it. You have to find your rhythm. As for the wheels hmmm if it's the older Dura Ace wheels they have a specific spoke pattern which you actually benefit with the Bontrager's. I think they are pretty comparable from what I remember. The tires are like buying motorcycle tires. As Joe has said, the Conti's are sweet but when your paying 30 or 40 bucks for a bicycle tire. Another important often overlooked piece, SEAT. It's a lot of testing but if you can get some help from the local bike shop you'll find one that you like. I use Fizik saddles with carbon rails and a carbon seat post. I've got Carbon bars, my frame is Aluminum with carbon seat stays and carbon fork.

Thanks! Yeah, my seat post is carbon. The stock seat was apparently replaced by a Selle Italia Flite Trans Am, which has Ti rails. I'm not sure about the seat stay (or what the seat stay is, exactly, to be honest).
 

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I second what Lance has said, and have a few things to add. The 53/39 is a pretty standard crank. Things are moving into compact cranksets (50/34) and that is what I have. That gives you more in the climbing end. 12-25 is also pretty standard. They make an 11-28 now, which would give you better leverage for uphills, and more speed in your 53-11 (vs. 53-12). As far as being good for climbs, your legs will tell you.

The Bontrager wheels are not stock for Giant. They're owned by Trek, so you'll find them on Trek, Gary Fisher, Litespeed (I think) and Klein. They're pretty expensive too, about $320 (MSRP) each. Aero wheels are heavy because of the shape, but you're supposed to gain some better aerodynamics from them. The Bontrager are about 1775g for the set. To put that into perspective, my Mavic wheels on my new Scott are 1550g for the set. About the same price but non-aero. The Dura-Ace wheels that came on it were probably about the same price, but non-aero.

The tires are OK, but I've never been a fan. The GP 4000s that I get are around $60 per tire, but worth it IMO.

As Lance said, SADDLE. That is the most important feature on your bike, and one of the few things you NEED to buy retail. The reason is because many have trial periods (make sure you check on this, do not get a saddle without a trial period). You need to try new saddles until you come across the "right" one. Keep in min, however, that it needs to be firm and needs to support your sit-bones. If the boys or the pee-pee go numb, it's not the right saddle (make sure it's level and only make minor adjustments). Your sit-bones will probably be sore the first few weeks, that's normal. Expect to pay anywhere from $100 - $200 for a good saddle.

Get padded shorts. The road-bike lycra kind. You'll look like a dork.

Finally, just ride.
Thanks for all the info. I've really had no problems with my current saddle, but maybe I'll look into some others. Maybe I just don't realize that it sucks or something. I'm really not sure what all the numbering for the gearing means or what it's supposed to mean to me, to be honest. Any way to give me a quick run-down?

Edit: Nevermind, I figured out what you mean with the gearing numbering. Since my front sprockets (crankset?) are 53 and 39T, the fastest gearing would be 53 up front and 12 in back with my current configuration. How expensive is it to change gearing? Would I have to buy a whole new setup or can you just change to a compact crankset pretty easily?
 

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I'm pretty sure although not positive that with the compact crankset is a new front derailleur since there is such a big drop. Everything else would just swap out though. You may need to chop a couple links from the chain. I've actually thought of switching myself, I don't know though.

Seat stays are the part that goes from the center of the rear wheel to just under the seat. Supposedly carbon helps absorb the shock through those. Chainstays are the center of the wheel to the crank (bottom bracket).
 
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