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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this morning on my way to work I put it over a *little* to far on [read: need more coffee] on one of these oily/cold/moist city streets... Went real squirrely but rode right through it... It's not to say that this didn't wake me up a bit and get me thinking that DUH these roads are a little slick- It's just that I rode away hearing the pedestrian at the intersection going "woah" [i guess] in anticipation of a wreck, and still didn't "feel" much of it- I just kept on going like it was just a normal part of riding (which I suppose it is in many ways).

My question is- am I too confident? Should I be more afraid about slides or loss of traction? This has happened to me a few times this year were I just road through it and onward smooth and steady without thinking twice... 3-4 years ago I would have had to stop and change my pants :> Every slip scared the crap out of me...

My Dad always said once you aren't afraid of it - it will bite you in the ass. I feel like I am not "fully" afraid (everyone's got some fear level I guess), but instead "observant" of it? Does that sound safe? Sensible?

EDIT: I suppose I will mention, I have lowsided twice early in my motorcycling "career", below 15mph both times... nothing more than a nasty bruise/scrape on my knee both times, while these aren't much they did get me to recognize how easy it is to hurt yourself...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think you're asking a question you already know the answer to.
You might be right, but the answers to me are mixed up- part of me feels like I should be afraid (per my Dad's thoughts) and the other half of me feels like it is a good thing I have worked past those "survival reactions" (per Keith Code's teachings haha)

I don't know what is better... maybe it doesn't matter and I am just over analyzing?

Part of what bothers me is I get to work and my boss tells me that this 21 y/o kid we know (helped do the flooring in our new office, was just chatting with him a week ago... bright dude) is in intensive care from a freakin car accident... and they don't have high hopes for him apparently...

Life is very "on or off" and I think that is what's got me thinking about this more.
 

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as long as you are still aware of it, then i dont think you should worry about it. i've thought about this too, since i've noticed when another vehicle cuts it close or someone pulls out in front of me, it doesn't phase me nearly as much as it did when riding at first (or situations like that of your original post). i suppose its something that I've gotten used too, but haven't forgotten how badly things can end by dismissing it completely.

you should see it as evidence that you are a mostly competent rider and can handle yourself accordingly in a sticky situation, but once you start going out of your way to do it in an extremely uncontrolled environment, then i would call it being overconfident and you should expect find yourself in the nearest ER.

just my 2 cents :thumbsup:
 

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I had similar experiences with my last pair of tires. I found NOT freaking out was more beneficial as long as you knew where that edge was on your traction limit. It used to be that I'd freak out and chop my throttle and make it worse, but a cool calm approach often lends a better outcome.
 

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I had similar experiences with my last pair of tires. I found NOT freaking out was more beneficial as long as you knew where that edge was on your traction limit. It used to be that I'd freak out and chop my throttle and make it worse, but a cool calm approach often lends a better outcome.
I tend to agree with this. Remaining calm and letting the bike do it's thing is almost always better than panicking. OTOH, if it was just because you were asleep at the bars, maybe it was less of a good thing.

It may be possible that you are over-confident, but I would not take this as prima facie evidence. Confidence is based on skills and experience and judgement you have. Over-confidence is based on skills, etc. you think you have, but really don't. It can be hard to tell the difference.

As a personal example, I always thought that I would quit riding if I had a crash that wasn't my fault. Oddly enough, after I was rear-ended (no injuries), I was quite calm, and it has never bothered me. Sometimes getting through the things that we fear leaves peace.
 

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Nah. You've already low-sided twice, so now it's no big deal to slide and catch.
; )

Just pay more attention to surface and tire conditions.
 

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I would agree with your dad. But I would say that you shouldn't worry about this. You were not afraid of the low side simply because you knew what to do to recover. If you are afraid of stuff you know how to do, then you should think about giving up the sport.

Being over confident? No. Not like you went into the turn looking to get as close to a low side as possible. Confidence is needed in this sport and probably had its part in allowing you to recover. Also you looked back to review the situation to avoid it. That is a sign that your head is in the right place.

No fear can just be as dangerous as unreasonable fear. Fear in of itself isn't a bad or good thing. It is how we allow it to manifest itself with it us that creates the danger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nah. You've already low-sided twice, so now it's no big deal to slide and catch.
;)

Just pay more attention to surface and tire conditions.
You know, this really says it... I was putting this out of my mind I think, but having already been down It's just less of a thought to me.

If you're afraid of riding or dying then motorcycling isn't for you.
I am not sure how you got to this conclusion, I am talking about NOT being afraid, or perhaps NOT being afraid enough.

I don't really agree with that statement in the first place, surely MANY people who ride are afraid of dying... it's totally separate issue from riding IMO.

Fear of death is a nature of being human, or for that matter, being alive.

A large part of me fears death because it would mean I couldn't ride my motorcycle :) I don't fear death on a motorcycle but I can't say I'd want to die in general... who could?

But this is a whole new topic lol :lmao:
 

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If you really want to investigate this further, get a small dirt bike and experiment with the limits of adhesion and how to calmly save the bike when the wheels begin to slip.
 

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pc--

I meant that if you felt afraid (or needed to feel afraid), then it isn't right for you. If you fear death by motorcycle, then it isn't for you. Yes, you're over thinking it. Yes, you're fishing for attention. Yes, you're being silly. Yes, I bet you're really young. Yes, I seem condescending, but I'm not trying to be. I'm actually chuckling as I type.
 

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There's a difference between respect and fear.

Don't be afraid of the bike and what it can do, and what can happen. Always respect the bike and what it can do, and what can happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
pc--

I meant that if you felt afraid (or needed to feel afraid), then it isn't right for you. If you fear death by motorcycle, then it isn't for you. Yes, you're over thinking it. Yes, you're fishing for attention. Yes, you're being silly. Yes, I bet you're really young. Yes, I seem condescending, but I'm not trying to be. I'm actually chuckling as I type.
Are you trying to get some sort of rise out of me? I know just what you are saying about fear- it's in my head already. So perhaps this was difficult to pose as a question, I guess it's more of a discussion topic- something I felt like talking about (and that others may want to discuss too) Everyone (including yourself) has posted an opinion or something relevant, that' is the point of a forum... discussion, communication.

And yes, you are right, fishing for attention is just what I am doing- Don't you think every thread started is a "fish for attention" - again, the whole point of a forum.

Also, 24 is very young, I agree- i know that, it's just one more reason I look to these forums and other riders to discuss my experiences and learn, about motorcycles, about motorcycling, and how all of it relates to me and who I am.
 

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Don't be so sensitive. I'm trying to accomplish nothing; just pointing out how your words come across.


You missed this part:



pc--

I meant that if you felt afraid (or needed to feel afraid), then it isn't right for you. If you fear death by motorcycle, then it isn't for you. Yes, you're over thinking it. Yes, you're fishing for attention. Yes, you're being silly. Yes, I bet you're really young. Yes, I seem condescending, but I'm not trying to be. I'm actually chuckling as I type.
 

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I didn't read the other responses but I feel like getting used to a little slide is a good thing. People are too tense riding as it is, so when things start getting hairy they panic. I would be willing to bet that a majority of low speed low sides could be avoided if the rider was more aware. When the bike starts to go recognize the signs and be able to correct. Dirt, gravel, oil, water, and other obligate lubricants are a part of street riding, be ready for them.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Don't be so sensitive. I'm trying to accomplish nothing; just pointing out how your words come across.
You mean:

Don't be so sensitive. I'm trying to accomplish nothing; just trolling cause I can.
Is that less sensitive for you?
:lmao:

Really though, if you are "trying to accomplish nothing"- why are you bothering to reply to the thread? Everyone else is just calmly discussing in a friendly manner... Like I said before, I just figured I'd bring it up, that it might be worth discussing.

Sorry if I offended you, or disrupted your day this much by communicating about motorcycling... on a motorcycling forum...


I didn't read the other responses but I feel like getting used to a little slide is a good thing. People are too tense riding as it is, so when things start getting hairy they panic. I would be willing to bet that a majority of low speed low sides could be avoided if the rider was more aware. When the bike starts to go recognize the signs and be able to correct. Dirt, gravel, oil, water, and other obligate lubricants are a part of street riding, be ready for them.
I agree entirely I think when I started riding I learned this quickly, but I have friends I know haven't figured out "loose" or "relaxed" riding... I think Keith Code also said something like "we ride best at 75% our limits".
 
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