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Hi. As it says in the subject line iam just tryingto get into the market for a cycle. After about a hundred hours of reading about diffrent cycles for a friend I desided I want one of my own. I dont plan to actually buy a cycle untill late january at the earliest however through all of my reasearch and rading I have come to belive I would like a SV650S. Since I am a beginner I belive this would be a grat cycleto learn on since all articles I have read point out that it is forgiving to beginners. Now I do have some hesitation about getting such a fine machine, such as it's "nekked" status, I want more of a sportbike look however I also understand it is easy to fit the SV650S with fairings. I am also not sure about the powerplant. While I know that a motorcycle does not ned a lot of power to propel it into orbit (or at least a low flight), I want something with a little "oomph" behind it. though the other cycle i was looking at (the GSX-R600) seems to be built more for a racetrack than a daily commuter to the job. Of course I have neer actually tested any of these cycles so I dont know if that is a preposterous clame or not. Still it seems that there is a nice field of aftermarket goodies for this sweet machine. By now you are probably wondering while Iam posting all this, well since all of yall seem to know what you are talking about I am wanting a little help. In your opionion what is a good year to look for? What should I be aware of when I actually do try to buy my cycle? And what can i do to wnsure i keep my cycle in pristine condition? Thank you in advance for your help on this and hopefully I can become a contributing member of this message board very soon
 
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Welcome to the two wheel world!

Honestly, I don't think you'll find any motorcycle wanting these days. Even the most humble "beginner bike" will flat out smoke most four wheelers out there at a fraction of the cost. But really it's not about speed; it's more about the perception of speed, and the SV will provide that in spades. FWIW, the GSXR is a pro level bike, and it takes a pro to get all it's got to give- most people will never even get close on the street.

But this is serious stuff. The mistake that might cost you a few thou in bodywork in the auto world may well cost you your life on two wheels.

My suggestion to you is to buy something cheap and well used, ride it for six months or a year and then consider moving up.

Ride safe!

:)
 

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georgia_boy said:
Hi. As it says in the subject line iam just tryingto get into the market for a cycle. After about a hundred hours of reading about diffrent cycles for a friend I desided I want one of my own. I dont plan to actually buy a cycle untill late january at the earliest however through all of my reasearch and rading I have come to belive I would like a SV650S.

Since I am a beginner I belive this would be a grat cycleto learn on since all articles I have read point out that it is forgiving to beginners. Now I do have some hesitation about getting such a fine machine, such as it's "nekked" status, I want more of a sportbike look however I also understand it is easy to fit the SV650S with fairings. I am also not sure about the powerplant. While I know that a motorcycle does not ned a lot of power to propel it into orbit (or at least a low flight), I want something with a little "oomph" behind it. though the other cycle i was looking at (the GSX-R600) seems to be built more for a racetrack than a daily commuter to the job. Of course I have neer actually tested any of these cycles so I dont know if that is a preposterous clame or not. Still it seems that there is a nice field of aftermarket goodies for this sweet machine.

By now you are probably wondering while Iam posting all this, well since all of yall seem to know what you are talking about I am wanting a little help. In your opionion what is a good year to look for? What should I be aware of when I actually do try to buy my cycle? And what can i do to wnsure i keep my cycle in pristine condition?

Thank you in advance for your help on this and hopefully I can become a contributing member of this message board very soon
I had to break that block up bro, I just had to do it.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
you know NC you are right and I am very aware of the lack of a big steel cage around me. And I was wanting tsomebody to say exactly what you did say to me. The GSXR is a pro level bike. I had a suspision of that seeing as the motto seemedto be "Own the race track" and tah is something I definately am not ready for. Thanks for the advise.


Nexus, thanks or breaking it us for me, seeing as I didnt sleep much i guess everything just semed to run together in one thought. aAnywho thanks man
 

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I bought an '05 SVS this past March as my first bike, and if I had to do it all over again, I would have bought something smaller. I did things the right way and took the MSF course and bought all the proper gear, but the SV can be alot to handle for someone like me.

If you are interested in power, any motorcycle will give you plenty. The SV has prodigious amounts of power over a large RPM range, but if you are inclined to flex your right wrist, the bike can get you in trouble. Also the V-Tiwn configurations lends itself well to a large amount of engine breaking. This means that if you let off the throttle in the middle of a corner, the suspension WILL be upset with you.

The SV can work as a first bike (I am living proof), but self control is a must. Whatever your decision, ride safe and ALWAYS wear your gear.
 

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I'm a firm believer in buying small and buying used and buying cheap for your first bike.

Used - If you've never ridden before, you can't be 100% sure you're gonna take to our sport. If you buy a used bike and decide to sell it in 6 months, you will almost certainly get back what you paid for it and you might even make a profit! I actually MADE $300 when I sold my first used bike! Plus, there are probably already a few scratches on it, and you won't feel so bad WHEN (not IF) you drop it.

Cheap - Same as above, so you wont feel so bad when you drop it. Dropping a brand new $6000 bike will make a grown man cry...dropping a used $1500 bike will only make you swear and shrug your shoulders and say "oh well, it was cheap anyway." Plus, buying a cheap bike will leave you more money to buy gear.

Small - Smaller displacement bikes are cheaper, and easy to find used. They are more forgiving to new riders, and easier to learn on. By "small displacement" I do not mean "SV 650." I mean 500 cc or less, preferably less.

I started on a Suzuki GZ250 that I bought used for $1200. Dropped it the first time I rode it. I rode it for two or three months and put about 2000 miles on it. I felt VERY comfortable on that bike, and thought I was ready to move up. I traded it in (and got $1500 for it) on a brand new 2004 SV650S...rode my GZ to the dealership to trade it in, so no choice but to ride the new SV home...no problem, right? Seriously, that 5 mile ride home, I thought I was going to die. It was SOOOOO much more machine, and I was NOT experienced enough to be able to handle it. Well, I took it easy for a while, and slowly I got more experience under my belt, so I'm far more comfortable now than I was then. But I feel that I DEFINATELY had NO business on this bike that day, and I really should have kept my smaller bike much longer.

Can you start out on an SV? Yeah, you CAN...but that doesnt mean you SHOULD.

First, take the MSF class.

Look for a cheap used 250cc bike, like a Suzuki GZ250 or a Kawasaki Ninja 250.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
If you are totally green to motorcycles of any type(no time on dirt bikes or anything), then you may be better off buying a more 'humble' bike like others have said above(250 ninjas or gs's). If you are a bit larger then average, you may wish to get a gs or ninja 500 instead. IMHO, if you are coordinated naturally, good on bikes or skateboards and other sports, etc; you will get bored with a 250 very quickly. A 500 can get you though an entire season without wanting to immediately jump to another bike. Either way, there are TONS of 'starter' bikes for sale used right now from people who started this season wanting to upgrade. A lot of them have very few miles and are only $1500-$2500 in great shape still under factory warranties!

Whatever you do, buy all your gear FIRST! People tend to 'cheat' as they learn if they only get the basic helmet and gloves, then bike, and budget over time for the rest of the gear. You should learn to wear full gear even before you learn how start the bike. It will also give you a lot more confidence, especially if you have a small 'accident' in the first few days of riding. You don't want to dump your bike practicing in a parking lot without even getting on a main road yet and getting hurt enough to scare you into not riding. Gear makes the difference between you cursing and picking the bike back up to try again(and looking to see if anyone saw you), and calling someone from the ground to come help you. :p
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Oh, and the MSF course can sometimes take FOREVER to get into, so you may as well try to sign up now. You can also hook up with a mature, very experience rider(not wheelie-boy down the street), to help you learn. A lot of larger moto shops hold parking lot beginner courses as well pretty regularly. I have even seen requests in want ads too for motorcyle instruction privately for a few bucks. And follow the 'rules'. Get a permit, gear, make sure the bike is properly registered, and INSURANCE before sitting on a bike. Even a broken finger can cost more then all your equipment and motorcycle without it. With everything in place, you are free to simply have fun and learn. Worrying about the other stuff definatley spoils your concentration.
 

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I want something with a little "oomph" behind it.
Any bike, even a lowly Ninja 250 will have more "oomph" than any car you have ever driven.

though the other cycle i was looking at (the GSX-R600) seems to be built more for a racetrack than a daily commuter to the job.
FWIW we call them "bikes" not cycles. The GSXR and other manufacturer's 600's are NOT good beginner bikes. These are purpose designed racebikes that are WAY too advanced for a beginner.

And what can i do to wnsure i keep my cycle in pristine condition?
Never ride it. ::) You WILL crash sooner or later so don't worry about it. My best suggestion is to not spend more on a bike than you are willing to throw away. It really sucks making payments on a pile of greasy parts in the garage.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
I think a perfect first bike is either a nekid 500 or a nekid first gen sv. Yes i am a nekid fan however i think getting a nekid bike for a first bike is alot smarter since it is going to go down save your self a bunch of money on the plastics. Also you can get a good used 500 or sv for a great price for what you are getting.
 
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