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an old thread deserves an old video
 

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It's not only nubies who drop bikes.

I've been riding since 2005. A couple nights ago, I dropped my 2007 SV 650 while leaving the gym. I was parked going uphill between two cars in a very full parking lot. Out of concern that there could be a car coming from the right, I was moving very slowly when I turned sharply to the left. Apparently I let the speed drop almost to zero, or was going too slowly to begin with; the the bike just fell over and I couldn't stop it. The irregular pavement and the fact that I was somewhat tired from a very thorough workout contributed to the problem. The only damage was to the shift lever; the end broke off, so I couldn't shift gears while riding. I had to put it into second gear before remounting and ride home on second gear only. Now I'm waiting for a new shift lever.

Lesson learned:

When in a parking lot and pulling out from between two cars that block my view, creep VERY slowly, like a fraction of a mph, with feet down, until it becomes possible to see adequately, especially when going uphill or if the pavement is uneven. And, be especially careful when tired.
 

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Re: No, you don't need training wheels.

Get off the street. Go to a large parking lot, sit on the bike and go over the controls very carefully. Like a swordsman or a boxer practicing, sit on the bike and imagine going away from a stop, going through the gears, coordinating the clutch and throttle, and braking. Sit on the bike and THINK through these things. Then ride, doing it. Again and again and again, until it is second nature.

Most new riders don't understand that slow speeds are harder because if they start to lose their balance, they then over-react on the controls and, well, you fall. So know your controls before you ride.

Ideally, you want to learn this on a dirt bike in the sand. Do that if you possibly can. Failing that, do take a motorcycle course.

The danger period is 2 months from now when you think you know what you are doing. Thats why you must next practice braking, and read, read, read!
It's a good idea to practice with a bicycle first. Of course there's a radical difference in power and weight, but both a motorcycle and a bicycle counter-steer. Being able to execute very short turns and figure 8s on a bicycle will make it easier to do it on a motorcycle. Also, it helps to practice turns on a bicycle that require high lean angles.

To understand counter-steering, ride a bicycle at night. While watching the headlight beam on the pavement, make some swerves; that makes it obvious that when swerving, one turns the handle bars the opposite way one wishes the bicycle to go. That approach leads to better understanding than the long winded and confusing lectures by an MSF instructor. For many people, counter-steering is completely natural and the explanations just make it seem like something difficult and unnatural. Even if a rider does not consciously understand counter-steering, probably the brain has it figured out. One can counter-steer quite well without even knowing what counter-steering is.
 

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It's not only nubies who drop bikes.

I've been riding since 2005. A couple nights ago, I dropped my 2007 SV 650 while leaving the gym. I was parked going uphill between two cars in a very full parking lot. Out of concern that there could be a car coming from the right, I was moving very slowly when I turned sharply to the left. Apparently I let the speed drop almost to zero, or was going too slowly to begin with; the the bike just fell over and I couldn't stop it. The irregular pavement and the fact that I was somewhat tired from a very thorough workout contributed to the problem. The only damage was to the shift lever; the end broke off, so I couldn't shift gears while riding. I had to put it into second gear before remounting and ride home on second gear only. Now I'm waiting for a new shift lever.

Lesson learned:

When in a parking lot and pulling out from between two cars that block my view, creep VERY slowly, like a fraction of a mph, with feet down, until it becomes possible to see adequately, especially when going uphill or if the pavement is uneven. And, be especially careful when tired.
Why didn't ya just make a new thread? Just wondering ...

Yeah I know what you mean, but not from personal experience. I was at Walmart the other day and there was a guy riding 2up on a 1k ninja, he was going through a yield intersection and it appeared that he was more concerned with traffic than his rapidly decreasing momentum. If he hadn't snapped out of it when he did I think he would have gone down right then.

Scary.


Sent via Android
 

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It's not only nubies who drop bikes.

I've been riding since 2005. A couple nights ago, I dropped my 2007 SV 650 while leaving the gym. I was parked going uphill between two cars in a very full parking lot. Out of concern that there could be a car coming from the right, I was moving very slowly when I turned sharply to the left. Apparently I let the speed drop almost to zero, or was going too slowly to begin with; the the bike just fell over and I couldn't stop it. The irregular pavement and the fact that I was somewhat tired from a very thorough workout contributed to the problem. The only damage was to the shift lever; the end broke off, so I couldn't shift gears while riding. I had to put it into second gear before remounting and ride home on second gear only. Now I'm waiting for a new shift lever.

Lesson learned:

When in a parking lot and pulling out from between two cars that block my view, creep VERY slowly, like a fraction of a mph, with feet down, until it becomes possible to see adequately, especially when going uphill or if the pavement is uneven.
And, be especially careful when tired.
I hate to continue a hijacked zombie thread, but that is perhaps the wrong "lesson" to learn. Learning to ride and control the bike at low speeds might be a better lesson.
 

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I hate to continue a hijacked zombie thread, but that is perhaps the wrong "lesson" to learn. Learning to ride and control the bike at low speeds might be a better lesson.
In response to an assertion that I have hijacked the thread, I looked at the first post. After reading the first post, it seems to me that my post is not a hijack, but instead, it is closely related to the original post. However, I shall not belabor the point.
 

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hmmmmmmm, some inspiration .... let's see ....

.... dont do it again. It usually hurts to some degree and hurts the wallet to fix the bike.
 
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