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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been riding for about a week now and have doing pretty good... I thought. Yesterday, I came to a complete stop shifting all the way down to a stop sign. turned the blinker on to the left, started going and next thing I know I'm in a bush. Was only going about 5mph tops but it's like I turned the bike and it headed straight , very wide turn to say the least. An old lady said "are you ok?" and I was like, "uh... sure." I was fine and the bike was left without a scratch. (just ordered frame sliders today). I picked it up embarassed but grateful we were both ok and rode it back to park it. Did I not look through my turn or could I have been going to fast or is it because I didn't put my feet up on the pegs in time? I'm not sure. Please give me some tips so I don't do this next time into a pole or a parked car. BTW, I ride in a quiet neighborhood with very little to no traffic. Maybe sugest some things I should practice in an open lot.

thx...
 

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More than likely, you just hit the gas, and didnt push to the right if it was a right hand turn. Also, remember, at low speeds, try to manipulate the bike instead of your body. If you lean, you will probably fall over. Also, dont grab a hand ful of throttle. When i ride around town, i generally tend to keep my wrist half way cocked so i dont grab too much throttle. I know, it is a bit uncomfortable for a while, but you will get used to it.
 
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Eh, stuff happens, take MSF if you havent, wear gear, and practice, practice, practice.
 

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If you havent already take an MSF course and then try to find some people in your area to ride with that arnt squids. Just remember to always think about what your doing...go slow and take it easy
 

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Sounds a lot like classic target fixation- getting slightly screwed up, fixating on the thing you don't want to hit, and, of course, running right into it.  

Have youtaken the MSF course?   If not, that's the first thing you need to do.  

If you've got the MSF course under your belt, remember that riding well demands concentration on what you're doing.  Sure, once you've got the whole "This is the clutch, this is the brake" thing down riding can get to be somewhat automatic, but if you're riding in that mindset you're just along for the ride...

HTH

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I want to take MSF but the classes are so booked up right now that I couldn't buy myself in. :'(
 

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We've all made newbie mistakes. Just be glad it's only your pride that was hurt. One very important thing to always remember: Look where you want to go! My guess is that you lost concentration and started looking at the bush, which is why you ended up in it. It's a hard thing to train yourself to not fixate on objects, but it is one of the most important things to learn.
 

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Hall Monitor
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-yz- said:
I want to take MSF but the classes are so booked up right now that I couldn't buy myself in. :'(
As a less-than-perfect alternative, find an experienced rider who has taken the course and is willing to take you under his (or her) wing.  Be careful, though.  As mentioned earlier, riding with the wrong people can lead to misinformation and myth at best, and  injury or even more serious consequences at worst.

And still take the course when you can.

Bill
 

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You might try to see if you can be on the waiting list, or as a "walk-on" in case the next MSF class has a no-show.
Please don't try to learn on the streets yourself. The SV is no Ninja 250, it has enough power to take you down in a hurry. See if a mature non-squidly friend can help you in the parking lot. +1 if they have already taken MSF, then they can run through the U-turn and figure 8 exercises - precisely the ones you need for slow turns.
Pick up "Proficient Motorcycling" by David Hough, from the bookstore and read it.
 

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If you can't get into the course, call MSF for your State and ask them who to talk to because you are having trouble getting in and they may provide some suggestions. I am not sure if that well help or not but it's worth a try. Also, if you do get someone who is "experienced" and can help you (in the parking lot with U-turns, figure 8's, etc), then you can also consider taking the Experienced Rider's Course. You can take your own motorcycle to that and it will help you get to know your bike. There is usually less of a waiting list with that course but it is also offered less frequently. I took both courses years ago.

Good luck!
 

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I have had my bike for 3 days now and i went down TWICE on the first day. You just gotta get back up and learn from your mistakes. Both of my falls were also while trying to turn. So i have teken it to a parking lot and thats where i will ride until I am comfortable. I dont have the courage to brave the roads just yet like you. I suggest like everyone else, finding someone you can trust to show you some things and be a mentor. Good luck!
 

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the first time I got on my bike after passing my written test (1980 750 virago) I left my alley and went to make the right turn on to the street.  Just like you I turned the bar and started to roll out, then gave 'er some gass and was really surprised when the bike went waaay wide.  I was able to keep it in my lane but I thought that was the end.
 

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Definitely find that open lot and start practicing. Your local DMV might have a handbook that includes diagrams of suggested low-speed drills. (Maine has them, anyway.) You'll want to practice: starts from a standstill (straight, right turn, left turn); figure 8 turns and zeros (circles) ; panic stops from 20, 30, 40 mph ; emergency counter-steering ; and basic slalom riding. You want to practice like this often enough that your reactions become second nature. Handling the turn signal, brake, clutch and shift are all just things you need to do almost without thinking, freeing your awareness to observe traffic.
Be careful in the lot, too. There has been more than one wreck in 'just a parking lot'. If you've got a riding friend, you can both go practice together (one at a time) just in case. ;)
 

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bmetz99 said:
Sounds a lot like classic target fixation- getting slightly screwed up, fixating on the thing you don't want to hit, and, of course, running right into it.  

Have youtaken the MSF course?   If not, that's the first thing you need to do.  

If you've got the MSF course under your belt, remember that riding well demands concentration on what you're doing.  Sure, once you've got the whole "This is the clutch, this is the brake" thing down riding can get to be somewhat automatic, but if you're riding in that mindset you're just along for the ride...

HTH

Bill
+1, Target fixation at it's finest.

BTW - Were you on a red 1st gen, and did you videotape it?
 

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You don't happen to have a red SV do you??? Maybe its just a red SV thing and bushes and shit.
 

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I'm so glad this post is here.  I just bought my bike on 3 days ago.  After taking the MSF course and feeling pretty comfortable on my boyfriend's Ducati Monster 620 the past times I've ridden it in a parking lot I thought I was ready to get on my new SV650 and go.  I did ok in the parking lot doing u-turns, etc and then decided to take it out through the arboretum in DC which has stop signs, curves, etc like a real situation only minimal traffic.  I got up to my first hill, stopped at the sign, went to make the tight right turn and freaked out a bit when the bike started rolling back.  I jammed on the throttle a little too hard and was down before I knew it.   :'(  Luckily I had very minimal damage.  The worst being my brake lever.  I was REALLY discouraged but got back on in the flat parking lot.  I took it out the next day to a parking lot with hills to work on the issues I had the day before and guess what happened...Again no more damage then the day before, luckily but I've been nervous that I'll never get it.  I've decided to go back to the flat parking lot and work on more drills, really understand my clutch/throttle ratio and pace myself until I'm comforatable.  Needless to say, I've already ordered frame sliders and a new brake lever.   :-[
Good luck to my fellow newbies!
 

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A right-hand turn from a hill stop is a toughie, because you need to lean into the side of the bike where your foot isn't on the ground (it's holding the rear brake). Use lane position to reduce the amount of lean/turn required - set up toward the left of your lane (not so far as to get run over by a cager cutting the corner), and angle the bike to the right a bit right before you stop. Besides that, it's a matter of feathering that clutch engagement point as you ease off the brake to get zero roll-back. Practice on steeper and steeper hills in a straight line, then go back to shallower hills and introduce the turn component.
 

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msf...

if you havn't, you need to

if you have, your passing grade should be revoked ;D
 

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Sounds like in all these cases there's a throttle control issue. You guys are getting way to hard on the throttle and your picking up speed faster than you can react. If you find yourself crashing and not even realizing its happening until you're down, you are using too much throttle. Go slowly, especially in situations where you are unfamiliar--like the uphill stop sign situation. Its tricky, but if you pick up speed gradually you should be able to do it easily.

Sounds also like you guys don't have a lot of confidence turning or leaning the bike. Countersteering is not intuitive, it takes explanation, training and practice to get used to. Definitely do not get a friend to teach you, take the MSF course. Do whatever it takes. I would recommend not riding on the street--outside of a practice lot--until you've taken, and passed, the MSF course. Even on the comparatively easy-to-ride SV, you could potentially hurt yourself badly.
 
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