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Ok, before I get blasted! let me explain:

I LOVE my SV as far as the handling goes. But I'm not too sure it is the same running SV as the rest of you guys are experiencing. I have a '00 SV and it has a bunch of miles on it. It's my first SV and I bought it bacause of all your guys great reviews on the bike. But it has so much back-pressure in the compression of the motor! I really can't rail low speed 90 degree turns very well because I can't figure out what gear to downshift to because my rear tire wants to break loose from the compression in the motor. Also, it only gets about 25 miles to the gallon. It's loud. I do have an after-market pipe on it, but still. It doesn't really seem very peppy, although I do not ride it very aggressively because when I let off it has so much compression! Am I nuts? Does this sound like the SV that you guys are riding?

I want to love this bike the way you guys love your!

Thanks

Brian O'
Team Faith
 

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I have both an inline 4 and my sv, and have rode other v-twins, and I must say it's just seems like the nature of these engine configuration. But the good things about these v-twins is you don't really have to drop as many gears as an inline 4, and it has enough torque to pull you through those tight turns even tho the rpms are lower than what you'd go through the turns with an inline 4. But that's just my experience. Sorry if it sounds like long rambling. ;D
 

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Double post?

I thought I had replied to this thread. Anyway, you need to start checking all the basics. Start with the plugs. Pull them and see what they look like. This will be a good indication if you're running, maybe, too rich. Put new plugs in. They're cheap enough.

Examine the rubber boots that attach the carburetors to the engine and the airbox to the carburetors. Make sure they are in good condition. Take a look at the air filter, make sure it's clean.

Try to find out what jet changes (if any) the previous owner made.

Feather the clutch in low speed turns. Twins have both lots of compression braking and lots of low speed torque. Feathering the clutch will help until you get used to the twin.
 

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Ok first, something is wrong... 25MPG :eek: I get around 50. Do check Plugs, Carbs(Jetting).

As for the compression, make your throttle inputs smooth. The twin will teach you real quick that the right grip is not an on/off switch. If your right hand is good then make sure a couple things are adjusted correctly: chain, throttle cable.
 

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treoff said:
Ok first, something is wrong... 25MPG  :eek: I get around 50. Do check Plugs, Carbs(Jetting).

As for the compression, make your throttle inputs smooth. The twin will teach you real quick that the right grip is not an on/off switch. If your right hand is good then make sure a couple things are adjusted correctly: chain, throttle cable.
+1, something is wrong. I have jets, filter and cams and get ~40MPG.
I'd suggest pulling the carbs and having a good look. Your main jets should be ~145-150 and needle jets should be 15 or 17.5. If they are indeed in that ballpark then I'd check float level. Also make sure your choke isn't sticking.

After your bike is running right then make the decision if the SV is right for you, judging a cripple is no fair! ;)
 
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I can relate, but I agree you have some issues to check. I relate because I always rode bikes with less compression --YZF750, and, get this, a TZR250 two stroke, no engine braking at all (great bike by the way). When I switched to the SV I had all kinds of issues with the way the throttle seemed to grab, so much compression, the first time I braked at the end of the straightaway on the track and downshifted I nearly needed new knickers!

Do what everyone suggests, and key, DO synch the carbs. Then get used to proper downshifting (I apologize if this is duh basic to you) but make sure you use a blip of the throttle to match engine speed to rear wheel speed when you downshift, you don't get rearwheel skip if you do it right. I've had Keith Code critique me a million times doing this -- on a stationary bike with the engine off. He can tell if you'll make the bike pitch by your timing, and now he has a computerized bike module that measures how well you do on matching engine speed for smooth downshifts. Now I'm fearless downshifting at the end of the straight.


Make sure you're jetted right, synched, and if worse comes to worst, I put a $139 Flo Commander on my bike and it helped smooth it out.

Cheers.

Ari
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone!

I will check the jetting and the carbs sync. I do have a Two Brothers exhaust on it. I'm not sure what the jetting is. I've been riding it for about 8 months now before making the post. I believe I know how to blip the throttle to match the RPM's and stuff, I just can't seem to get used to it is all. But maybe its just me! Thanks guys!
 

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teamfaith said:
Thanks everyone!

I will check the jetting and the carbs sync. I do have a Two Brothers exhaust on it. I'm not sure what the jetting is. I've been riding it for about 8 months now before making the post. I believe I know how to blip the throttle to match the RPM's and stuff, I just can't seem to get used to it is all. But maybe its just me! Thanks guys!
Don't take this the wrong way, but I seem to understand your confusion a little more. If you want to get your bike running right, find a friend or a shop that you trust.

As for how it all works, Sportbike Performance Handbook (ISBN 0-7603-0229-4). That book is a great place to start. The more you know about what you ride, the better you can ride it. :D
 
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