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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This weekend i fired up the SV (can't bear to put it away) in really dense foggy, 20 degree weather and let it idle for a while, and took it for a short spin. when i got it back home i noticed that it wasn't idling correctly. It started at about 1500 where it should be, then dropped down, lower and lower till it died. Whats the deal?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
seemed to run a little slower than it should've, given the conditions. But i've never ridden in fog before so i dont know how that affected anything. I mean, this was a lot of fog. (and ill never do it again either! :eek:)
 

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yeah, I was just gonna say that. Or maybe your floats are gummed up, not letting enough fuel in. The fog is the worst to ride in. I have never had a carb ice up before so I don't know to much about that problem.
 

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yes, carbs are refrigerators, the low pressure causes a temperature drop, moisture in the air forms ice crystals in the carb and jets, causeing a rich mixture like you have the chioke on when not needed

if conditions are marginal, sometimes shutting the engine off a few minutes allows the heat from the engine to get to the carbs and warm them up enuf to stop the icing problem, but if conditions are more severe, it will soon start to ice up again

in the UK, SVs come with carb heaters, ours are wired for them , but heaters are not listed on the parts fiche so dealers here can't seem to get them. I have heard good reviews of a product called Silkolene PRO FST, it's a fuel addative that disolves the ice crystals.

Today I had a conversation with an aviator, I am going to stop at my local airstrip to see if they have anything that might help
 

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RandyO said:
yes, carbs are refrigerators, the low pressure causes a temperature drop, moisture in the air forms ice crystals in the carb and jets, causeing a rich mixture like you have the chioke on when not needed

if conditions are marginal, sometimes shutting the engine off a few minutes allows the heat from the engine to get to the carbs and warm them up enuf to stop the icing problem, but if conditions are more severe, it will soon start to ice up again

in the UK, SVs come with carb heaters, ours are wired for them , but heaters are not listed on the parts fiche so dealers here can't seem to get them.  I have heard good reviews of a product called Silkolene PRO FST, it's a fuel addative that disolves the ice crystals.

Today I had a conversation with an aviator, I am going to stop at my local airstrip to see if they have anything that might help
In small aircraft, carb icing is indicated by a loss in RPM and/or engine roughness. It is confirmed by appling carb heat and seeing the RPMs drop initially but then rise as the ice melts off.

The carb heat in a small normally aspirated aircraft is just a gate that can be opened to allow exhaust into the carb air intake. It works well but it bypasses the air filter so it can let dirty air into the carb. It also makes the engine develop less power. That being said, I don't know what your local airstrip might have that could be applied to a bike but let me know if they do.
 
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