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I voted today. I took advantage of Ohio’s early voting availability, avoided long lines and a potential trial conflict on November 6th and cast my ballot this morning. I ask every Amercan voter reading this to follow my lead and vote.

It doesn’t matter to me whether you vote for the same candidates I did, as much as it matters that you show the politicians, talking heads and cynical predators on our political economy that you are paying attention and are willing to make the minimal effort required to actually vote. America is a democracy and, as is tritely oft-repeated, in a democracy we get the government we deserve. I’d say we’ve been pretty bad lately to deserve the government, and especially the political ecology we’ve got. It’s time we went about taking responsibility for re-making that climate, raising expectations for performance and candor, taking back the role of the electorate in whole, rather than the sliced and diced demographic mosaic that we have allowed the Political Class to divide us into.. The first step is to vote.

In 2008, a presidential election year, barely over 60% of American voters bothered to vote. That means that the election was a contest between groups of people who were highly motivated, but not necessarily people whose motivations were for the general welfare of the nation. Union members turned out to support pro-union candidates. Defense workers turned out to vote for politicians who promised to protect expensive defense contract, whether necessary for national security or not. Health insurance investors voted to protect commercial insurance markets. This kind of narrow, single-issue voting is actually rational only if we believe that the great majority of American voters, who may not have an important single-issue voting stake, will not bother turning out to vote. And as long as so many Americans just throw up our hands and opt-out of the democratic process, the narrow-issue voters will have the attention of the narrow-issue politicians, and the narrow-issue money spreaders will spread their narrow-issue money onto the all-too-happy-to-oblige Talktococrats on the ocean of money-sucking political media.

Low turnout is a cause of a whole syndrome of political ills. It leads to voter suppression. If everybody shares the foregone conclusion that they will vote, the idea of discouraging certain voters becomes a vain hope. It would be like trying to discourage people from breathing. Low turnout encourages financial perversion of the legislative process. If only a few people bother voting in something like a congressional race, the winner will certainly know who his/her financial supporters are, and will feel no compunction about serving their narrow financial and legislative interest. After all, who’s going to bother to object? If they didn’t make the effort to vote against him/her last time, what makes anybody think they’ll bother next time? And, as we all understand, the dearest thing in every incumbent’s heart is not sterling public service but re-election. Low turnout also discourages the advancement of ideas championed by minority parties. Libertarians, Greens, Constitutionalists all struggle every election cycle to get their candidates on the ballot, to get their candidates recognized for debates, and to get their issues discussed in the news. But if the disaffected voters who now cynically (I won’t say “lazily”) abstain from voting went to the polls, found candidates from smaller parties whose ideas attracted them, and VOTED, the political landscape in America would change.

It goes without saying that over centuries Americans have served, suffered and sometimes died so that we can hold and enjoy the freedom and responsibility of our democracy. We are the inheritors of their sacrifices. We are the beneficiaries of their service. We are, in turn, the living link to our childrens’ collective futures. When we ignore our responsibilities as citizens, we cheapen that heritage and jeopardize the political health of those who will follow us. We owe our predecessors; we owe our children, we owe each other; we owe ourselves the short time it takes to participate in our elections.
 

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The same can be said about the freedom of choice. Trying to force someone to do something just because they can basically then revokes the whole freedom of choice aspect. :p
 

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I lived in Chicago 30 yrs ago. Bet I've already "voted" there.
 

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Well, I've already stated that this is the last election I'm taking part in so I'm no longer in a position to preach about the importance of voting.

This concept of early voting, though. I often wonder what percentage of those who do it change their minds by election day.

I also wonder how many people realize that, when it comes to the presidency, the only reason why they are able to vote early at all is because, constitutionally speaking, their vote is meaningless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I also wonder how many people realize that, when it comes to the presidency, the only reason why they are able to vote early at all is because, constitutionally speaking, their vote is meaningless.
As a result of historical and personal accident, and geography, my vote counts. And as I've argued above, if everrybody actually voted, more votes would actually count, and not just for the purposes of the Electoral College.
 

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I wish I could vote early and be done with it already. I'm solid with my opinion of who's got the better plan.



Sent from my left testical using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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My dad was born a Republican.



He was raised a Republican.



He voted Republican his whole life.



But he died several years ago.















Now he votes Democrat!

:lmao:
 

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I vote seriously for everything on the ballot except for the presidency. With the Electoral College (especially here in CA) and hating the candidates in general, I try to vote for a candidate who is not Republican or Democrat and, if I can find out any statistics, has the largest amount of supporters. I do this because I dislike our 2-party system and throw my vote in the direction where at least some 3rd party may get notice.
 

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the most important decisions are at your local, county/state level

doesn't matter if you vote for the right guy at the top of the ticket if you vote for the wrong guys at the bottom
 

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I vote seriously for everything on the ballot except for the presidency. With the Electoral College (especially here in CA) and hating the candidates in general, I try to vote for a candidate who is not Republican or Democrat and, if I can find out any statistics, has the largest amount of supporters. I do this because I dislike our 2-party system and throw my vote in the direction where at least some 3rd party may get notice.
Well, if I do vote 3rd party this time, it will be because he better reflects my views. That said, your reason for doing it is one I'm aware of as well. It's a constant fight for 3rd party candidates to even get on the ballot. It would be nice to see some of them make it onto the ballot simply by virtue of how well they did the previous election, eliminating the need to do a lot of unnecessary ground work.

the most important decisions are at your local, county/state level

doesn't matter if you vote for the right guy at the top of the ticket if you vote for the wrong guys at the bottom
True. Sadly, they are also the hardest to educate yourself on.
 
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