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Okay so I just replaced my chain and sprockets today and took pics in an effort to show you how easy it is to do and save you a ton of money by not paying someone else do it for you.

Okay so you need to get the new chain and sprockets from where ever you'd like. I recommend Sprocket Center.Com for their variety of kits/brands, speed of shipping and overall price. And you SHOULD replace BOTH sprockets AND the chain all at the same time to get the maximum life out of them. Just replacing one or two of the three is going to accelerate wear and cause you to replace them more frequently.


New chain, sprockets and rivet links.



Okay so get your bike on the rear stand remove chain guard and front sprocket side cover. Do not break your chain till after you've removed the front sprocket nut, trust me on this point. Tools: Philips head screw driver, 8mm socket.



Okay so remove the clutch return spring from the bottom and remove the clutch release assembly from the bike to gain access to the front sprocket nut. Tap back the tab on the lock washer behind the sprocket nut with a screw driver and mallot. Tools: Needle nose pliers, flat screw driver, rubber mallet, 10mm socket, 32mm socket.



Using a breaker bar, wood block or something to hold the rear wheel in place laid across the swing arms use a breaker bar with a the 32mm socket and short extension to remove the sprocket nut and locking spacer behind it. (see reassembly pic for help) Tools: 32mm socket, 6" extension, breaker bar.



Okay NOW you can brake your chain with a chain breaker tool or you can cut it with a dremel or hacksaw. Tools: Motion Pro Chain Breaker.


Once your chain is broken remove it from the bike and also remove the front sprocket at this time. Tools: none



Okay so this is where you should be at this time.


So now remove your rear wheel per manual directions to access the rear sprocket. Remove the nuts with a socket wrench or breaker bar (I had to use mine) and remove the sprocket. Tools: 14mm socket, breaker bar

:)
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

Part 2

You may need to pull the cush drive out if your sprocket bolts fall back into the wheel hub. They are notched on the back side so make sure you put them back in correctly once you've placed on your new rear sprocket. I used blue thread locker on the sprocket bolts and then torqued them to the proper specs, 43.5ft/lbs, in a star pattern: Tools 14mm socket, torque wrench.



While you have the cush drive out you also may want to inspect and re-lube the bearings in it too if needed. Replace your cush drive unit into the rear wheel and remount that onto the bike but do not tighten rear nut till all adjustments are done when the new chain is mounted. Tools: none



Now you can put on the new front sprocket and lock washer in front of it and feed your new chain onto the sprockets.



You new chain will be shorter in length then the old due to wear so you'll need to loosen the chain tension adjusters to fit the chain on.



I roll the chain onto the rear sprocket to hold it in place to make fitting the master link easier. If you're having a tough time loosen the tension adjusters more and then push the rear wheel forward until you can grab the end with the sprocket and roll it back towards the rear. Tools: none.



Make sure you follow the chain makers direction for installing the master or clip link and use the grease that is supplied with it. Again you can see why I use the sprocket to hold the chain in place when doing this step.



Finally use a chain link press to press on the outer side link to the proper depth: Tools: Motion Pro Chain Press



I used a side plate from the old chain to measure the correct pressing of the new side plate. D.I.D. recommends the pins should protrude the depth of a plate so this seemed the best way to gauge if I've pressed the new plate on enough. Looks good to me.



Now you need to press the rivets to flare them. Again follow your chain's recommendation for the amount of flaring to have. Tools: Motion Pro Chain Riveter.



Rivet is done and looks good.



Now again you'll need to brace the rear wheel when you torque down the front sprocket nut. 1st gens are 105ft/lbs, 2nd gen owners check your manual. I again used blue thread locker on the sprocket nut. Tools: 32mm socket, 6" extension, torque wrench.



The final step is to tap down the lock washer on the front sprocket nut to keep it from backing off and you're done with the replacement steps.



At this point all that's left to do it adjust the tension of the chain to the proper slack, tighten your rear axle nuts, remount your chain guard and front sprocket cover and clean up.



Done!



The Motion Pro's Chain Breaker and Riveting Tool kit (#08-0058 ). I paid $99.99 for it at Cycle Gear but this is available at most every shop or can be ordered on line.


I hope this helps. Answers some of your questions. Saves you so money and gives you a sense of accomplishment in doing it yourself. Also if you own a 2nd Gen SV please check your manual for torque spec as they may be different from the 1st Gen specs.


**Please don't PM me, if you have a question just post it in the thread and someone will answer it for you, I swear.**

Nexus242
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

I just did this today on my 2nd gen. but I could not complete the job because: I got a 110 link chain and I need to remove a link (109), I don't have a tool to cut the chain and press the rivet link. The front sprocket torque is the same on the 2nd gen.
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

nice nexus, I just did mine the other day almost the same setup, same chain but I stuck with the sunstar sprockets. I also used a dial caliper to measure the master link to make sure it was pressed on the same as the others.



I went up one on the back 15 and 45.
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

I cant help but notice that the chain pinch tool looks alot like a C clamp. Is there any difference or could i just use a regular clamp?
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

Could not finish...:'(

Anyone know where I can get a CHEAP chain tool for cutting AND pressing??
The motion-pro kit is not expensive. For your immediate need, you might be able to borrow the riveter from a local shop.
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

+1

I had a buddy who had his chain come undone at the clip-on master link (on his 2nd gen SVS). I guess a clip on will work, but to be safe I am going with the rivet link due to my SVS being a torque machine.:p

BTW, I still need to remove a link from the chain. Got a 110 link chain and I need a 109 link chain.

Does anyone know if there is any harm in having a 108 link chain? I would imagine it will still work, I would probably just need to adjust the rear sprocket in about a 1/2".
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

so it looks like you pulled your entire rear wheel off to change sprocket (not that there's any other way).

But, recently, I've heard of some riders having problems with rear sprocket alignment to the front sprocket. How did you align your sprocket?

I've read about the ones where you measure from swingarm pivot, but not sure how effective that is when measuring the mufflerside.

great write up! Thanks!
For me measuring from the pivot bolt worked a lot better than using the stupid hash marks they have on the swingarm. Not to much gets in the way either.
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

For me measuring from the pivot bolt worked a lot better than using the stupid hash marks they have on the swingarm. Not to much gets in the way either.
You can't trust the swingarm hash marks.

What I like to do is tighten the left adjuster first until the chain tension is right, then put a straightedge on the sprocket and tighten the right adjuster until the face of the straightedge that's against the sprocket lines up with the inside edge of the inner sideplates on the chain.

The pivot bolt measurement will get the rear wheel true to the frame of the bike. The straightedge method will get the rear wheel true to the front sprocket. The string method (described elsewhere) will get the rear wheel true to the front wheel.

In principle, they should all be the same. In the event that there's some discrepancy, I like to align the sprockets because that should get the chassis alignment close enough so I'd never know the difference, AND prolong my sprocket and chain life.

Hope this helps.
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

Sigh. I really have no desire to spend the additional $75+ for the motion pro tools to do this. I have a brand new set of steel sprockets, and a D.I.D gold chain sitting RIGHT on my counter right now. All I need is a 32mm Socket and a way to press and rivet the master link and I am set.

Do I really need to spend $55 for the motion pro press tool and another $20 for the chain breaker/riveting conversion?
YES!

Don't think of it as money spent on tools, think of it as money saved on service from a stupid mechanic who will probably do it wrong anyhow.

You absolutely need the specialized tools for this, don't skimp out.
 

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Re: Replacing your chain and sprockets: my way

Well, a heads up for everyone looking to replace their chain.

www.PowersportSuperstore.com

Has the:

MotionPro 08-0066
530 CHAIN PRESS TOOL KIT

and the

MotionPro 08-0403
CHAIN BREAKER & RIVETING CONVERSION KIT 08-0403

for $63.91 Shipped. Best deal I've found.
 
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