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I couldn't seem to find anything with a nice write up or pictures (probably because it isn't warranted) but I figured I'd put this out there anyway. Maybe it'll end up with the other "vertically challenged" mods.

Also, this is my first real post here. Any (constructive) comments would be greatly appreciated!

I love my SV but it was just a bit too tall for me. On a good day, I have a 30" inseam, and trying to tip-toe down my very steep driveway just wasn't doing it for me, so I decided that some sort of lowering modification was in order.

After considering my options, I decided to have someone replace the seat foam. Unfortunately, I wanted to have it done in less than 24 hours, so that someone ended up being me. I have never done anything like this before, but I am extremely pleased with the results, so hopefully that will give some of you out there the courage to destroy your perfectly (not) good OEM seat. :)

In the end, I replaced the ~3" of factory foam with 1" of super-dense foam, netting me around two inches.

Let's get started, shall we?

My replacement foam of choice is actually a Dynamat product called DynaLiner. it comes in many thicknesses, but I chose a 1/2" thickness mainly because that's what I could find. However, it worked out really well. The foam is extremely dense and squishy. It actually reminds me of a neoprene or something of that sort. Also, it is adhesive-backed, which is pretty sweet. Just peel and stick...very easy to work with. I was also attracted to the Dynamat by the potential human "exhaust-gas" muffling effect. Just kidding. :) I bought an 18x24" scrap of DynaLiner from a local auto-customizing-type-shop.

The first step, obviously, is to remove your seat. Of course, I didn't take any pictures of this part, so you'll just have to use your imagination. On my bike, I had to remove a couple of trim panels (1 bolt each) to get to the bolts that attach the seat to the rest of the bike. (2 more bolts, one on each side)

Now you should have something that looks like this:


The next step is to get out the flat head screwdriver and needle-nose pliers, flip the seat over, and start pulling out alllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll those staples holding the vinyl seat cover in place. It's easier than it looks. :)


After you remove the cover, set it aside. You'll be left with the polyurethane seat foam attached to the plastic seat base. The foam is glued to the plastic at the front and back, but if you peel it off carefully, it should come off without issue.


Now, if you spent any time at all looking at the plastic seat base, you probably noticed that it's not exactly a nice, smooth surface. It has big holes and little crevices and is generally an unpleasant place to put your behind. Not that the OEM seat is very pleasant on the behind to begin with. To remedy this situation, I cut some pieces of the DynaLiner to size and stuck them inside the larger holes. (The largest piece of foam in the picture is just padding...)


I sort of changed my seat design half-way through the process, so my extra padding ended up being in two medium-sized pieces rather than one large piece, as you can see in the picture. You can't tell in the finished product.


Now for the scary part. Take your big-'ol hunk of DynaLiner and lay it on top of the seat to get an idea of how it will fit on there. Once you've figured out how you'll align the DynaLiner, you can cut into it so it will go on nice and easy. I only made two cuts. Each cut is 5" long and the two cuts are 6" apart, giving you a 6" strip in the center that will run up the front side of the seat. The picture will give you a better idea of what I'm talking about.


Once you're satisfied with everything, peel off that huge piece of paper backing and (very carefully) stick the DynaLiner to your seat. Make sure everything is nice and smooth once it is in place. I was pretty impressed with the strength of the adhesive backing, and at the same time with how easy it seemed to be to peel it off and stick it back in place somewhere else. That said, I recommend doing it right the first time. :)


Now that the foam is in place, trim around the edges and use the scrap to fill in those two corners that the big piece didn't cover.


At this point, I did some more trimming around the edge and added a sort of beveled edge on the top side of the foam. It's a little difficult to see.


Now it's time for the most painful part. :) Grab that vinyl seat cover you removed and throw it over the top of your DynaLiner'd seat. The stock seat was kind of flat on top; now you've got a big U. What the heck are you supposed to do with that? Stretching and pulling. Stretch and pull as if your life depended on it. Start at the bottom of the U shape. (near the front end of the seat) Pull the vinyl as tight as you possibly can until it hugs the contours of the seat, then staple it in place. (I recommend a pneumatic stapler...the spring action models just don't have the power to drive into that plastic. Also, try not to use staples longer than about 1/4") Work your way to the back of the seat from there, and once the back is finished, you can tidy up the top/front edge.


If you've done everything well, you should have some achey muscles and a seat that looks like this:


Here's how it looks when reattached (click for larger version):
 

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My butt and nuts hurt just looking at that!! Bring on the Tucks pads and creme!!
 

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My butt and nuts hurt just looking at that!! Bring on the Tucks pads and creme!!
LOL...I'm not old enough for that sort of stuff yet ;) I'll deal with a little buttache if it means I can put my feet flat on the ground when I stop!
 
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