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Iron Butt Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please read the entire writeup before proceeding, there are important tips along the way, you may also have to buy a few things so please read all the way thru.

First off, you will need to prep the bike. I suggest putting the bike on stands if you have them for stability. My centerstand was more than sufficient.

Next, remove the front fairing, this will make it so much easier to do the most interesting part of the install. Remove the front and rear seats, and prop up the tank on the tank stand found under the rear seat. Detach the negative battery terminal and make sure it doesn't tough anthing. Also remove the airbox cover, if you have large fingers or hands, you may want to just remove the entire airbox to help in routing the wires to the battery.



Also, remove the stock bulbs, remove the windshield and mirrors, then set the fairing on something soft as to not scratch the paint.



Next step: Install the new bulbs in the headlamps, the only go in one way.



Put the rubber boots back on the back of the bulbs. One of the wires will not go thru the little plastic piece, when putting the boot back on i ran the 3rd wire thru the center hole but make sure it came thru on the bottom of the center plug. You'll notice the third wire is not in the right position right now, I moved it later.



Next, figure out where to mount the silver transformers (i don't know if this is correct but it will do). Since these puppies will get a little warm I chose not to mount them to the plastic housing on the bottom of the fairing. Instead I chose to mount them directly to the fairing. You will need mounting bolts, washers and nuts. Prep the area of install by thoroughly cleaning and using alcohol prep pads to remove all the grime. Mark the mounting holes and slowly drill the holes. Thread the bolts, make sure to put a washer on both sides of the fairing/plastic, apply the double stick pad to the bottom of the silver transformer and put the transformer on the bolts, press firmly to the fairing/plastic. Once it is stuck, it is stuck so make sure you are ready. Apply thread locker (blue) to the threads and thread the nuts and tighten but do not overtighen, you don't want to crack the fairing/plastic. Repeat for the other silver transformer. You can see where I installed them in this picture. You'll also see my crack in the fairing :tard:.



Next step is installing the little black boxes off the headlights. I choose to mount these to the lower black plastic housing on the fairing so the will not get that wet. Mark the holes, drill and apply washers on both sides of the fairing/plastic, apply threadlocker (blue) and tighten the nuts down snuggly but no more the threadlocker will do the rest. Notice the new holes.



Here is what everything looks like once installed. You will only need 1 of the original 2 headlight plugs so tuck one away somewhere.



Now for the fun part.

Stretch out the wiring and get a plan as to where you want to put the fuses and wires. You have 2 options at this point:

Option 1: Try and use the wiring as is, it will be a really tight stretch to the battery but it will work. Keep in mind that the fuses will end up in a not so good spot and that is under the tank and that is if you can get the fuses thru the left side of the frame (we didn't try this). The fuses and wiring will go thru the right side of the frame but the wiring will be too short to reach the positive terminal, unaltered.

Option 2: Add about 2.5-3 feet of wiring that will go to the positive terminal on the battery, add the wire in front of the fuses. This will do 2 things, give you the extra length to make installation easier and give you enough length to put the fuses under the rear seat. But do not add the extended wire just yet, go ahead and clip the positive terminal lead in front of the fuses, leaving a good 2 inches (so the fuses are still attached to the positive terminal lead), and set the fuses/terminal wiring aside for now. This will make it easier to route the wires thru the frame. If you opt for this option you will need about 6 feet of 12-14 guage wire, make sure you match the gauge that is already in the wiring or go step up. You will also need connectors or soddering kit and shrinkewrap. You may also want to pick up a larger terminal connection for the ground. I will explain a little later.

Since I went with option 2, the following is based off that idea. Take the positive terminal lead and the ground lead and thread it thru the left side of the frame following the other wiring. If you are going with option 1, this is where you may not be able to get the fuses thru the left side, they will fit thru the right side though. See picture, you are following the stock wiring thru the frame.



Pull the positive terminal lead thru next to the airbox and at this point, pull it up and leave it there, sticking out next to the airbox. Take the ground lead and figure out where you want to attach it. I attached it to the bolt just in front of the fram slider. This is where you will need a larger loop for attachment. Do not try to drill the hole out it is too soft. You can do what we did and clip the loop so it looks like a "C" and will go around the large bolt.



Here is the ground lead attached.



Now, for option 1 stretch the wires to the positive terminal lead and attach at this point. Like I said before, they may not reach. I do not know the results of this option as we did not do this. For option 2, take the positive terminal lead with the fuses and attach 3 feet of wire to both snipped wires in front of the fuses.

Thread the wires from the rear seat forward,



around the battery,



behind the frame and behind the wiring connector from the fuel tank up to the original wiring you left sticking out by the airbox. Attach the extended wires to the originals and tuck in the wires behind the frame.



Next step is to mount the relays and the last big black box all hanging in front of the frame under the guages at this point. If you look closely at this picture again, you will see that there is a very tidy little spot directly behind the guage cluster that is perfect for this.



Mount the black converter box (the large one) by ziptiing it to the mounting plate. Ziptie the relays on either side of the converter box.



Pull the slack positive terminal wiring back to the rear seat area and ziptie the fuse someplace with easy access. Make sure to leave enough slack to allow access to move the fuses boxes enough to have to change fuses in the future if need be. I allowed about 2 inches from the ziptie to the fuse boxes.



Reinstall the airbox lid/airbox, drop the tank, put the tank prop away under the rear seat and reinstall the rear seat. You are now ready to put the fairing back on. Reinstall the fairing, windshield, mirrors. Attach the remaining connections to the silver transformers and tuck the wiring into the fairing. Do not ziptie everything in place jsut yet.



From the side this is all you see now, just a couple of bolt heads.



Now, attach the negative battery lead turn the key and check. If the headlights do not come on, pull the polarity plug out from under the fairing and reverse the white plug and reinstall, try the key again. Once you have succeeded in having operational lights, you don't blow any fuses and don't smell any smoke, :thumbsup:, go ahead and reinstall the seat and ziptie everything down so it doesn't come flying out while rolling down the road. Here is the end result.



Congratulations on your install. I hope this tutorial helps someone out in the future. Make sure to check you aim on the headlights so they are not pointed directly at motorists and go for a nice long test ride.


:thumbsup:
 

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Re: HID headlight installation on second gen 650S.

Absolutely awesome write up Kell. :thumbsup: :eek:ccasion14:
 

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Re: HID headlight installation on second gen 650S.

not to be an ASS but there is a reason why the federal gov't doesn't not allow cars and bikes that do not come with HID stock to have it installed. HID projectors are different than regular projectors. So even if you have a cutoff and have it lowered down, you still have enough glare to blind motorists. and no, i'm not talking out of my ass on this one.
 

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Iron Butt Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: HID headlight installation on second gen 650S.

I wish they would, more like is a safety concern. Especially up here in deer country.
 

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Iron Butt Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: HID headlight installation on second gen 650S.

Thanks, I had done this wih my stock lamps, i want to actually get the bike out at dark and look for myself. I have to find someplace level to do that again to make sure. You are right about the 4 turns, stock setting is WAY too low.
 

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Re: HID headlight installation on second gen 650S.

lkm said:
not to be an ASS but there is a reason why the federal gov't doesn't not allow cars and bikes that do not come with HID stock to have it installed. HID projectors are different than regular projectors. So even if you have a cutoff and have it lowered down, you still have enough glare to blind motorists. and no, i'm not talking out of my ass on this one.
True that a vehicle that isn't designed from the factory with HID's is now illegal, and yes there are reasons for this (exactly what are specific reasons along with how truthful they are seems to be to debatable like many of our laws)... And you are right, there are differences with reflective head lamps to projector sytles...

But to say it doesn't matter how "lowered down, you still have enough to glare to blind motorists" may be to broad to be true.

And what I mean by that is regular head lamps can be glaring enough to blind, being pointed to high or someone who drives with their high beams, etc.

Along with there are those with factory HID's that are also glaring enough to blind, good example of this is my best friends 2000 Honda S2000... He is always getting flashed/high beamed for his Factory HID's, while with my 2004 Nissan 350Z (Base version that didn't come with HID's originally which also had small lens projectors) I installed a 9500K hid kit on and never did I get flashed or high beamed back by other drivers (daily driver as well). And I ended up leveling them at the same level as the OEM bulbs. From going to the stock lights to the bright blue light... It was a HUGE difference in night driving, I could see more and road signs didn't glare back as they did with the OEM bulbs. Best mod I ever did, really slightly beat out my Cusco LSD I had on the Z for best mod.

From talking to people, we all seem to agree... HID's are very noticable, but not as annoying or distracting as those who only change their OEM bulbs to white bulbs (like Silverstars or something of that nature).

And maybe more people are now more used to HID's then before, since more cars are available with them then 5-10 years ago.

I don't know, but I do think esp. on a bike it is very important to be noticed, hence why lights are day time running... So I don't see it being a huge issue to have HID's on a bike.


Oh and to the starter of the thread... Nice write up! What bulb type did you end up using and what kit?
 

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Iron Butt Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: HID headlight installation on second gen 650S.

The bulb is an H4, I do not remember the name of the kit, I bought it from Stranger. The installation was pretty easy actually. I have a couple of head on shots from the parking garage.

This is from about 30ft, no they are not aimed yet and yes the camera makes it look worse than it it. I knelt down and looked directly into them at eye level from 30ft and they are much easier on the eyes vs. the standard halogen.
 
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