Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I did a bit of searching and I didn't find a how-to for adding a new relay to slow down the blink rate of aftermarket LED flashers. What I did see, however, was a bunch of questions on how to do it, and tons of threads about 'Why doesn't my relay work?' (which it seems is due to buying the incorrect relay). So, here's a quick how-to on this simple fix to the annoying fast blink rate with LED signals.

NOTE: This installation was done on a 2009 SV650S. This may or may not apply to other years and/or models of SV.

Total time needed: 20-40 minutes, depending upon experience/skill level

Tools needed (well, recommended):
-Wire cutter/stripper/crimper
-Soldering iron with solder
-screwdriver/hex key (depending upon choice of grounding sites)
-jeweler's flathead screwdriver
-lighter
-electrical wire (I used 18ga)
-ring terminal (1)
-heat shrink tubing


The first step is to choose the correct flasher. You can order a plug and play flasher from Amazon or Ebay that will simply replace the existing relay. However, if you're reading this how-to guide, you probably want to either save $10-$15 or you're impatient and don't want to wait for the flasher to arrive in the mail.

The relay I used is a three-prong Tridon EP34. This relay DOES work with both front and rear LED blinkers.



This cost me $12.99 from my local Autozone. Any auto parts store should have them in stock for about $10-$15 or so. I originally purchased a Tridon EL12 two-prong relay. This relay does not work with both front and rear LED blinkers. When the turn signals are activated they stay on rather than blink.

The next step is to locate the flasher relay. It is under the passenger seat. It should look like this:



Remove the relay (the box next to the fuse). It comes out simply by pulling on it.

You must next orient yourself to the relevant wiring.



The light blue and brown wires in the positions indicated on the picture are from the turn signal circuit. Here is a diagram that may help as well:



The positive and negative turn signal wires need to be removed from the relay. In order to do this, use a small flat head jewelers screwdriver to pry the wires out from the top. You'll feel a 'click' when you've loosened them. They'll then easily pull right out.



Once removed from the module, here they are:


The next step is going to be to attach the wires to the new relay and ground. You must first figure out which terminals on the new relay go to which wires. The back of the relay package has a labeled diagram for this.



The positive wire (brown) goes to the positive relay terminal.
The negative wire (light blue) goes to the negative relay terminal.
A ground wire will attach to the lamp relay terminal.

***Before soldering, crimping, or heat shrinking any of the wires, just twist them into place and then turn on the blinkers to ensure they work. You don't want to go through all of that work just to find out it doesn't work on your bike.***

To make the ground wire, get a length of wire appropriate for where you'll be grounding the wire. I used about an 8-10" length of wire for my install. Strip the ends and crimp a ring terminal onto one end. Then solder the other end to the lamp terminal of the relay. Cover the soldered area with heat shrink tubing. Then attach the ring terminal to a suitable ground bolt.

I used this one:


Then get two more lengths of wire a few inches long and solder them to the turn signal circuit wires, and then solder those wires to the appropriate relay terminals. You can alternatively just solder the wires from the stock module directly to the new relay. However, I prefer to add the extra wire to give me more room to put the new relay where I want. Remember to put heat shrink tubing over any of the areas with bare metal. I prefer to use different colored wires to avoid attaching the wrong wires to the wrong terminals.

Once finished, the relay should look something like this:




I then cleaned it up a bit by wedging the new relay under the stock module.



That's it. That's all there is to it!

This took me about a half an hour to do, including taking pictures (hell, writing this up has taken twice as long as it took me to actually do it!). This is a very easy mod to do that doesn't take any special electrical skills, beyond soldering and crimping. I should have done this months ago. Some people like the faster blink rate with LEDs. Personally, I don't. I find that the fast blink rate doesn't draw my attention nearly as much as a normal blink rate when I see them on other peoples' bikes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,559 Posts
Awww [email protected]! I just realized we have a FAQ section here on this forum... With this how-to already posted. lol
None the less, very nice job photo-docing the process, Max! Please don't let that stop you from posting other awesome stuff. :thumbsup:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,729 Posts
Nice detailed photo-doc

However:

There are simpler two wire relay choices that do not require the addition of a ground wire.

Having said that also note that a 'ground' should always be connected to battery negative (or to a black/white wire in the harness) - NOT to a point on the frame. There is NO current that flows the frame per OEM components and the frame itself is not actually connected to battery negative, only the engine is (and the connections to the frame are compromised by paint/anodization).
This is not a car - frame is not active circuit component.

But today, to be honest, the best method is just to use the plug n play LED relay, which has come down to extremely reasonable price these days.
(I wouldn't replace mine with this since it's already done with external 2-pin relay but if I was starting from scratch would buy this one)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/LED-Flasher-Relay-for-Suzuki-GSXR-Bandit-Hayabusa-SV-GSF-TL-600-1000-1250-DRZ400-/380472501789?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item5895eda61d&vxp=mtr

Like TeeRiver, feedback certainly not intended to discourage, just honest critique
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Nice detailed photo-doc
Thank you.

However:

There are simpler two wire relay choices that do not require the addition of a ground wire.
True. I just couldn't find any that are regularly stocked at most brick and mortar auto parts stores. This how-to was geared toward being able to walk into a local auto parts store and pick up the parts needed and then finish the install all in the same day (or hour, honestly). If you know of any two wire relays that will work with four LED blinkers that are regularly stocked at most auto parts stores, post them up, as that would be an easier install.

Having said that also note that a 'ground' should always be connected to battery negative (or to a black/white wire in the harness) - NOT to a point on the frame. There is NO current that flows the frame per OEM components and the frame itself is not actually connected to battery negative, only the engine is (and the connections to the frame are compromised by paint/anodization).
This is not a car - frame is not active circuit component.
My test light disagrees with your assessment. The frame is adequately grounded. The many places in which the engine is mounted to the frame provides ample current if it is used for a ground. It is true that the current can't flow through the paint. However, where the engine is mounted to the frame, there are breaks in the paint. I have not modified the stock electrical system, aside from turn signals, auxiliary lights, and a Gerbings heat troller. None of these change how the frame is grounded.

Furthermore, the proof is in the pudding, as they say. With the ground wire disconnected, the flasher relay fails to work properly. With the ground wire attached to the subframe, it works as intended.

But today, to be honest, the best method is just to use the plug n play LED relay, which has come down to extremely reasonable price these days.
(I wouldn't replace mine with this since it's already done with external 2-pin relay but if I was starting from scratch would buy this one)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/LED-Flasher-Relay-for-Suzuki-GSXR-Bandit-Hayabusa-SV-GSF-TL-600-1000-1250-DRZ400-/380472501789?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item5895eda61d&vxp=mtr
I don't think this is the best method per se. I do think it is the easiest method, however. The method I have detailed provides a quick and less expensive route of achieving the same ends.

Like TeeRiver, feedback certainly not intended to discourage, just honest critique
I appreciate the feedback. However, make sure that the advice you give is accurate. The bit about the frame not being grounded is inaccurate.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,729 Posts
... However, make sure that the advice you give is accurate. The bit about the frame not being grounded is inaccurate.
If you are going to admonish me, at least try to quote me accurately.
Note that I did not specifically say what you 'quoted' - "about the frame not being grounded" - I stated that there is no direct electrical connection to the frame from the battery negative and that zero current flows through the frame as an active circuit member in OEM configuration.

My comment was and is accurate - the frame is not intended to be a circuit component - there are no OEM devices on the entire bike connected to the frame or subframe - with the exception of your wire.

What 'works' and what is correct are not the same thing - that is merely what I wished to point out and to correct YOUR inaccurate advice.
If you're happy with it that's all that matters - but when offering how-to for others, make sure you know about what you are professing - and don't take the hump when someone tries to give constructive feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Just to add to the noise... You should be able to find 2 terminal electronic flashers at just about any big name auto store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
If you are going to admonish me, at least try to quote me accurately.
Note that I did not specifically say what you 'quoted' - "about the frame not being grounded" - I stated that there is no direct electrical connection to the frame from the battery negative and that zero current flows through the frame as an active circuit member in OEM configuration.
Nowhere did I misquote you. I simply broke your post into smaller pieces to reply to each of them individually.

My comment was and is accurate - the frame is not intended to be a circuit component - there are no OEM devices on the entire bike connected to the frame or subframe - with the exception of your wire.

What 'works' and what is correct are not the same thing - that is merely what I wished to point out and to correct YOUR inaccurate advice.
If you're happy with it that's all that matters - but when offering how-to for others, make sure you know about what you are professing - and don't take the hump when someone tries to give constructive feedback.
Could you please provide a reference, or at least a good explanation why the frame should not be used for ground? Just because there is no stock wiring connected to the frame is not a valid reason.

Prior to making the ground connection, I checked to ensure there was current flowing from a positive point to the subframe where I attached the ground. How would this be incorrect?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Just to add to the noise... You should be able to find 2 terminal electronic flashers at just about any big name auto store.
If you know of any specific two-terminal electronic relays that work with all four flashers converted to LED that are also commonly stocked at most auto parts stores, please post them up. That is what I wanted to use, but after poking around the internet for awhile, it seemed that the commonly stocked two-terminal relays would only work if two of the four flashers were LED.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,400 Posts
If you know of any specific two-terminal electronic relays that work with all four flashers converted to LED that are also commonly stocked at most auto parts stores, please post them up. That is what I wanted to use, but after poking around the internet for awhile, it seemed that the commonly stocked two-terminal relays would only work if two of the four flashers were LED.
I didn't think it was that hard to find, at least here in Detroit. When I did my GS, my local auto parts store had tons of electronic flashers to chose from. For what it's worth, mine was one of the generic round ones, not the fancy thing you had in your write up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I didn't think it was that hard to find, at least here in Detroit. When I did my GS, my local auto parts store had tons of electronic flashers to chose from. For what it's worth, mine was one of the generic round ones, not the fancy thing you had in your write up.
That's the type I tried using at first and it didn't work at all (though there may be a specific brand that does). It turned my blinkers into dim marker lights! :lmao:

I do know that this specific three-prong model does work though. If there were a list of commonly stocked two-terminal relays that definitely work with four LED flashers, that would be great. I would have much rather used a two-terminal one... Plus it would prevent the debate on whether the frame should be used for a grounding point or not.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top