Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had to do one so I figured I would document the procedure. I didn’t check the time when I started and stopped, but I would guess the total time to do both calipers was probably about 1.5 hours. But I was in no rush and having to stop and clean up a bit to grab the camera to take the pics surely slowed me down a bit.

This rebuild is for a set of 1999 GSXR 600 calipers, but the principals are the same for most calipers.

I want to apologize up front. Some of the pics did not turn out the best, but you will get the point of them.

Before we do anything you want to inspect your calipers to see what parts you are going to replace. Just the seals or the seals and pistons. Don’t forget to take a good look at the slide pin. It is a wearable item and only costs ~$2. If yours looks like this replace it. The pic didn’t turn out the best, but the black spots are wear marks from the pads. It actually has concave indentions preventing the pads from sliding smoothly.



Once you know what parts you are going to replace get them ordered.
Now we can begin the actual work. In addition to this guide look up and read the manufacture instructions for performing this maintenance.
Start of with a clean area to work in. Get your tools and supplies out and ready and inventory the replacement parts. Make sure you have a new bottle of brake fluid and plenty of clean rags, you are going to need them. To remove the seals you will need something like the dental pick. It allows you to get in behind the seal to pull it out without damaging the seal groove. Also a couple of acid brushes to scrub out the cylinder bores and seal grooves. The glass bowl at the top is for some of the clean brake fluid.



Get an old bowl and dump out as much fluid as you can to minimize it spraying everywhere. Look at all that soot that was in there…nasty



Once the fluid is out you are going to pull that clip off them pull the slide pin out of the caliper body. Now you can remove the pads.



Now you can pop out the pistons. I put a piece of scrap wood between the pistons to keep them from completely popping out and hitting the other each other. This is a must if you are going to re-use the pistons. They are soft metal and can be easily damaged. Stick the air hose with spray attachment into the brake line port and give it a squeeze. You should hear and feel the pistons pop out.



Once you remove the pistons break the two haves of the caliper apart. They are held together with four allen head screws. They are likely to be very tight so cheater bark might com in handy. You can see some corrosion on the bolts I have already removed. Make sure you clean them up before you re-install them.



Split in half. Don’t know if you can tell, but the pistons are different sizes.



Now we get to remove the old seals. The top dust seals are pretty easy, but the inner seals can be a little tougher to get out. Just take your time and try not to nick up the cylinder bores or seal grooves.



These were some nasty seals



The bores, especially the top ones, were really nasty. Mine had a lot of corrosion behind the seals.

Now you get to scrub out the cylinders. Make sure you get the grooves really well. To scrub them out get your acid brush. You may want to cut one down to make the bristles stiffer. Dip the acid brush in some of the brake fluid you originally dumped out and give each caliper half a good scrub down. Look at the crap I scrubbed off.



Now get your can of brake fluid and pour just a little bit into one of the cylinders. Be careful if you have the half with the brake line port since when you start to pour in some fluid it will leak out. You should see the fluid flow into the other cylinder via a small orifice. Roll the caliper from side to side to help clear out any gunk in the center orifice. If you look at the caliper half there will be a small orifice on each side where the small seals were when you separated the halves. Roll the caliper so that fluid starts to flow through those orifices as well. Pour out the fluid into the dirty fluid bowl. Repeat this procedure a couple of times until you are satisfied that the gunk is out of the caliper. At this point I like to scrub down the entire caliper body then wipe up as much of the fluid as possible. Don’t worry about wiping out the cylinders you are going to put some fluid in there on the next couple of steps.
Remember that bowl I spoke of earlier with the clean fluid in it. Well drop your seals into the fluid and let them soak for a minute.



Now that they have soaked dig in there and find one of the thick seals. Those are in the inner seals. My manual clearly shows that they should have a beveled edge, but the washers I received do not. My research has found that I am not the only one who has encountered this. Do not fret about it. However, if the seals do have the beveled edge, ensure you install them correctly. Look at the manufactures instructions that I told you to get at the beginning for the correct orientation.

Install the seals on each half of the caliper. Once the seals are installed place the pistons in the fluid.

Now I like to fill the cylinders about half way with clean fluid before I put in the pistons. I believe it makes bleeding the calipers just a bit easier.

Get a piston from the fluid and place the solid side into it matching cylinder bore. Press it in evenly. Take note that as you press it in it will displace some of the fluid that you placed in there. Watch out for it squirting out of the small orifices on the edges. Once one piston is on do the other. Really watch for the fluid shooting out of the orifices now. Clean up any fluid that has no doubt gotten on the caliper body. Now do the other half. Remember the half with the brake line port will leak out the fluid you pour into the cylinders



Place the small seals on one side of the caliper outer orifice’s.

You are almost ready to re-assemble the halves. Remember those corroded bolts? If you didn’t do so in the beginning clean them up now.

Alright bolts clean and ready, caliper halves ready, small seals in place. Gently bring the two halves together making sure the small seals remain in place. Start a bolt into one of holes and hand tighten it. Now do a bolt on the other side of the caliper. Once you get two bolts in and the caliper is together you can start the others than snug them down to spec. Specs are located in the instructions.

At this point I get a clean rag and spray some brake cleaner onto the rag and wipe down the caliper body. You don’t want to spray the caliper itself since the brake line port is still open. Putting it on a rag allows you to control exactly where it touches the caliper. Once all cleaned up you can re-install the pad slide pin and pads. Make sure you put the clip back on.



Look at all of the crap you got out and off of the caliper. Nasty I say.



Now put the calipers back on your bike and have fun bleeding them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,207 Posts
Excellent right up! And just in time seeing as I may have to do that with the GSXR front end I just bought. Or maybe I should do it simply because it's easiest now.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The manual says to use brake fluid to clean with. I suppose it is to keep the introduction of chemicals that could break down the fluid from getting inside. Yah I know it will dissolve, but I didn't want to take any chances especially since the brake fluid did a really good job of getting the gunk off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,246 Posts
This is great!

Another nice step if you have the option is to put the halves into an ultrasonic cleaner.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
Nice work!

Stupid question, you mention using brake fluid a few times to clean the innards, is there a reason not to use brake cleaner in there?
You can use brake cleaner but you have to be careful to get it all out.

So, people don't normally hone them unless something is obviously gouged?
I don't think anybody ever hones brake cylinders anymore. If they're gouged, you throw them away. I'm not sure it would even be a good idea to hone aluminum brake cylinders...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
You can use brake cleaner but you have to be careful to get it all out.
I don't think anybody ever hones brake cylinders anymore. If they're gouged, you throw them away. I'm not sure it would even be a good idea to hone aluminum brake cylinders...
Gotcha. The vehicle I've worked most on was a mid-80's pontiac so that is generally my frame of reference when I mention silly things.
Edit: Thanks for the write-up Harsh... Which reminds me: wouldn't it be nice if all the images in the FAQs could be hosted on svrider so they don't go away when someone deletes their photobucket account?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is great!

Another nice step if you have the option is to put the halves into an ultrasonic cleaner.
**** I wish I would have thought of that since I have access to an ultrasonic cleaner.

Must...resist...the...urge...to...take...them...apart
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
FWIW, Sv calipers are relatively cheap and you will find, that if your paying labor rates for the time that it takes to rebuild a caliper, that you can buy a new caliper for less money
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,246 Posts
**** I wish I would have thought of that since I have access to an ultrasonic cleaner.

Must...resist...the...urge...to...take...them...apart
You can also dip and powdercoat them :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You can also dip and powdercoat them :)
Now that is just downright mean. I have access to powder coat equipment as well. We have two booths big enough to put cars in. You name it, my Light Industrial Facility (LIFAC) probably has it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
FWIW, Sv calipers are relatively cheap and you will find, that if your paying labor rates for the time that it takes to rebuild a caliper, that you can buy a new caliper for less money
While they are cheap if you get them used (new will run you ~ $135 per caliper) you still may run into someone who used a screwdriver to pry the pistons apart when they inadvertently squeezed the lever with nothing between them. A piston set which includes new pistons and seals will set you back ~$20 per caliper. The point of documenting this was to show how easy it is to do yourself. Hence not having to pay a dealership labor.


Note: I pulled my prices from Ron Ayers for an 2005 SV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,036 Posts
great writeup. I took mine apart and cleaned them last winter but they were nowhere as dirty as yours. Wonder how all that crud gets in there seeing as how it's a closed system and all?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
great writeup. I took mine apart and cleaned them last winter but they were nowhere as dirty as yours. Wonder how all that crud gets in there seeing as how it's a closed system and all?
A lot of the crud _IS_ the seals; the rest is crap that got past them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would take a gander at them. If they have pads already in them you can check those for uneven wear which can give you insight as to if a piston(s) is sticking. More than likely they have never been rebuilt so you are looking at 10 year old stuff. Not necessarily a problem, but I hope you understand what I am trying to imply. I am going to assume you have the 6 pot calipers (stock on the SRAD 750's). Just so you know the rebuild kits and pads are more $$ than a number of others. I swapped out my calipers for a set of 4 pots stockers from a 99 gsxr 600.

As for the fork seals I recently posted in a thread about some special tools you will need to preform the maintenance yourself on those.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top