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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering how long you let the bike warm up, from being completely cold, to taking off? I usually try to wait to about 30C - 45C (95F - 113F) before going, and then taking it easy until she's up to temp.
 

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I start the bike, let it idle gently until it reaches about 100F - 110F, and I take it easy until I hit about 175F.

But I don't lug the bike while getting up to temp, I prefer to keep the rpms below 5,500 rpms until she is up to temp.
 

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Sometimes, if I'm late for work, I have to take off quickly. I do about the same as what the other guys are saying though.

On a gen 2 sv you check the temp by looking down. Not sure about your bikes. :)
 

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Sometimes, if I'm late for work, I have to take off quickly. I do about the same as what the other guys are saying though
If I'm late, I don't take the bike lol. Gear takes time to put on, then move the bike out of the garage and fire it up, then (to answer the original question), take time to put in my ear-plugs, get my helmet secured and my gloves on (generally it's up to about 100*F by then). Take it easy until temp stabilizes.
 

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I wasn't even aware something like warm-up time would be in the manual.

I just roll the bike out of the garage, start it, put on gloves, go. There's no reason to let a fuel-injected bike idle for a while before you ride it - though wringing the **** out of it from the get-go is a different story.

It takes roughly one to three seconds for fresh oil to be flowing everywhere after startup. During this time period is when a good deal of wear occurs on all the friction parts in an engine. Idling the bike for another two minutes isn't going to do anything as combustion temps are low, and the oil temps are still going to be very low. If anything, idling is more destructive on an engine than having a steady, low-level load on it (such as cruising down the road at 35-40mph) since combustion temps are low, and oil pressure tends to be a little bit lower as well.

Combustion by-productions will accumulate much more quickly in the oil of an engine that is idling. Moisture and gasoline take much longer to evaporate/burn out of the oil as well.

In short, there's no benefit to letting your fuel-injected bike idle for 5-15 minutes before you ride it. Carbureted is a different story, however.
 
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