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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's hot. My gear is sweaty.

Some of it is obvious, helmet liner for instance, but what about a leather jacket? Lexol for the leather, but the inside? Mines got a sort of textile, net fabric kinda thing lining it. The zip out liner is no prob.

Oh and no Lexol on gloves.

My leather pants are silicon impregnated to waterproof them. They are also lined. Any ideas?

What do you do with your racing boots? I usually just toss shoes before they get funky.

Btw, I searched and I lost my owners manuals when I moved. :(
 

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What they said.

As for manuals, just about every gear manufacturer offers their manuals on their respective websites.
 

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Mesh gets soap and water. Leather parts of it(elbows and back) get leather treatment

Leather gets leather treatment. Boots and gloves get rain, frebreese and baking soda. Helmet gets Lysol and the padding gets washed.

Thats about it.


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I just pulled the pads out of my helmet and threw them in the washer and let them air dry. My helmet smelled mountain breeze fresh on the ride in! I dont worry about my jacket. If it gets bad, I will just febreeze it. If the liner smells, that is removable and can be washed. For leather, you can take it somewhere to have it professionally cleaned. For my textile, I would just pull the pads out and throw it in the washer if it got really bad.
 

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Technically, my Fieldsheer mesh jackets aren't supposed to be washed. My Wife has one of those new-fangled front -load washing machines w/a steam cycle and it seems to do a great job GETTING the bug guts out (almost all of my riding is at night due to our wonderful Texas summer heat) and we then just air-dry the jacket before reinserting the armor.
I Febreze the inside of the jacket and the crotch areas (inside and outside) of my kevlar-reinforced jeans after every ride and use Helmet Fresh after each ride, as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Febreze is cool but I don't feel like it actually CLEANS anything. Know what I mean?

So this is the inside of my jacket ~



And this~



Needs cleaned too. The spine protector has articulating plastic vertebrae on the back, so I don't feel comfortable throwing it in the washer.

The interior of my pants are similar to the jacket with the added complication of the mentioned silicon impregnated leather. Come to think of it, the interior of my boots is also similar. They aren't leather though. They are Lorica.

I'm thinking I'll just replace the gloves. They aren't that bad but they are white and sweat has seeped through the leather more than once. I'm not sure how that affects integrity.

I wish I could take all of the fabric out of my leather gear. :(
 

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Light Cleaning (i.e. cleaning dried bugs, sap, misc stuff after a canyon run) - Armoral Cleaning Wipes. Amazing stuff, takes 1 wipe and 2 minutes to make my jacket look totally clean. Works great for textile or leather.

Heavy Cleaning (i.e. several months of riding, needs a real wash) - For textiles, remove armor, wash in washing machine gentle cycle with Woolite. Hang dry.
 

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My Leather gloves make my hands smell like dirty feet latley..........
they're alot of money to just toss....i could use a soulution also!
 

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Googled this, for hockey gloves, but it seems generically appliccable.

Deodorize the Gloves
For old gloves, or for gloves that are used in intense games, the hockey glove smell may be quite strong and pungent. They work fine for their purpose, but leave you with really sweaty-smelling hands. To prevent your hands from smelling like really old and stinky leather, here are some ways to deodorize your hockey gloves: •Deodorizing spray. A small amount of clothing deodorizer sprayed on the inside and the outside of the glove can help mask some of the pungent, sweat odors.
•Fabric softener strips. The same machine washing materials that make your blankets smell like sunshine can help remove odors from the glove. One or two fabric softener strips placed inside each glove can make the pair smell fantastic.
•Leather conditioner. Most hockey gloves are covered with synthetic leather, although older gloves and customized gloves may be covered with natural leather. Leather conditioner helps clean the pores of the leather, and rid it of dirt and grime. Make sure to use just enough leather conditioner to clean the glove, because leather conditioner tends to turn the textile stiff.
•Clean socks and baking soda. One trick used by some hockey players is to pack the gloves in clean socks dusted with baking soda or talcum powder. The powdery substances absorb some of the odors, and the fibers of clean socks can help wick away some of the excess moisture.

Wash Your Hands
Smelly hockey gloves are caused by smelly hands. While it does help to buy a hockey glove that provides adequate ventilation for your hands, the best way to prevent hockey gloves from stinking up is to keep your hands clean before and after the game: •Soap and water. Make sure to get down deep between the fingers, the fingernails, and the palms of your hands.
•Rubbing alcohol with moisturizing properties can help mask the odor of the sweat coming off the sweat glands of your hands during play. Rub alcohol on your hands before and after the game.
•Shaving cream. A trick used by many hockey players is to rub some mint-scented shaving cream on their hands after the game. Shaving cream contains some ingredients that can help remove the odor of a worn hockey glove from your hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow gc, that's a lot of great stuff.

I really think I'll try putting my jacket in the freezer overnight. I'll let it dry in a cool dark place slowly and hit it with Lexol, then Febreze the inside.

I bet that will work great. :)

Thanks man.
 

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I also see people putting gloves in the freezer overnight to kill bacteria.
Doesn't that actually preserve bacteria?


Also, I know of this duffus who washed his helmet pads and lost them on the top of his minivan. Duh!


Wait...



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Washing your hands with shaving cream will get rid of glove stink for sure. As a hockey guy, I've used that method for years.

I know some hockey rinks have machines for cleaning hockey equipment. This could be a solution for textile/mesh gear. I would do some homework on that before trying it. Not sure how well it may work for riding gear versus hockey gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Anyone know, if you nuked it with with Lysol, would the smell dissipate fairly quickly?

That might be worse than just letting it be. I actually don't sweat that much, truthfully, but the idea of germs multiplying is skeeving me out.
 

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Honestly, freezing them sounds like a good idea. Freezing surely won't kill all the bacteria, but it will kill many. If you freeze them on a regular basis, you could keep the live bacterial load down before they 'grow' back. This is highly dependent upon the species of bacteria, of course, but it's worth a try IMO. While I'm no expert in microbiology, I do have a bachelors in biology and am currently in medical school. The reason behind the suggestion is sound IMO.

In the article, they are basically saying that washing is better than freezing. For something that is easily washable like jeans, this is good advice. For something that is difficult to clean, like leather gloves or boots, it makes sense to me.

In the end, what could it hurt to try? If it works, great! If it doesn't, at least you know.
 

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What about baking leathers? I have no idea how leather holds up to 250 degree temps though. Any plastic or padding might deform or even melt, especially if it's ABS. Would be the best way to kill off any bacteria, but you're still not really cleaning it. With all the remaining sweat, dirt, and skin flakes, bacteria would be able to repopulate quite quickly.
 
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