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that I just bought? I scoured the crap out of it with soap and hot water. Then I put some lard in it and heated it up on low heat for about 20 mins, rubbing the fat into the pan. I thought that this was enough to season it.

I seasoned a couple steaks and turned the burner to high, because I wanted to sear them. The pan started giving off this really noxious odor and smoking like crazy. I put the steaks back in the fridge because I think I've done something wrong here.

Did I season the pan correctly? I heard you can cook with really high heat (stove on max) with cast iron pans. I don't understand how the seasoning doesn't burn off at this temperature. Is it supposed to stink and smoke like a b!tch over high heat? Do I need to season the pan more?
 

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A brand new cast iron skillet is not the easiest thing to cook with. Keep seasoning it. Don't use soap to clean it because of its porous nature it will absorb the soap too like it does the seasoning.

I rarely use HIGH heat on mine. Medium high, plus I almost always use some kind of oil in it when I cook.

btw, mine is 30 years old so its seen a LOT of time on the stove.
 

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You didn't season the pan correctly. What skillet exactly did you buy?

Do a google search on "seasoning a cast iron skillet" and read a bunch of them. I typically rub it down with peanut oil and stick it in the oven for 5 hours at 400 degrees or so for the first time. Then I let it cool in the oven and repeat greasting it up and baking it a few times though only for an hour baking time. Use an oil with higher flash, which means it gives off smoke at higher temperatures rather than lower ones. (Lard and butter have low flash.)

If you bought a pre-seasoned skillet, then it's ready to use right away--unless you scour the crap out of it with soap.
 

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Yeah to season a cast iron skillet you rub it down with lard and stick it in the oven on high untill it stops smoking...might even take another cycle or two, then you scour the flakes out of the inside and your ready to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
unfortunately this pan was unseasoned when i bought it, and I kinda had to scour it with soap because of the sticker they stick on the surface. Plus I didn't want to be eating any sort of chemicals leftover from casting or packing they might have used.

I didn't have any shortening left so I had to cut some fat trimmings off a piece of pork, which I melted into the pan. I let it cook in the oven for an hour, then cooked some really fatty burgers with it. It still doesn't have that black seasoned look to it. I'm guessing I just have to keep cooking fatty foods?


Also, is it ok to use metal cooking utensils on this thing? Or will it scratch the seasoned layer (once I form one)?
 

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I use metal with mine, but seems the stuff I've learned from 30 years of cooking with mine don't seem to agree with the "book" versions. So.....IDK.
 

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The seasoned layer is called a "patina" ... if you use a really old, really well-seasoned pan with a deep patina, metal utensils can be okay. If you have a brand spanking new patina then the metal utensils can scrape it up. It takes awhile for the patina to turn dark and black. Once it's well-formed, then the pan will be nice and non-stick (this will take many uses).
 

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Well the chemicals and even the sticker glue would have been burned off during the seasoning process, the pork fat was a crafty idea and should work fine but you need to season it longer.

Metal utensils won't hurt it at all, and you want to try to scratch those flakes off before you cook with it or their just going to end up in your food.

The seasoning "layer" does'nt really do much of anything for the cooking process itself, iron is really porous like a sponge, by seasoning it your forcing the oils all the way through it and that prevents it from rusting and absorbing liquids from your food that would breed all sorts of nasties inside the metal.
 

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Don't tell me you bought the 3 piece skillet set from HF. I was looking at those. They also have ceramic chefs knifes too. I couldn't get myself to buy kitchen utensils that are made in china.
 

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I didn't have any shortening left so I had to cut some fat trimmings off a piece of pork, which I melted into the pan. I let it cook in the oven for an hour, then cooked some really fatty burgers with it. It still doesn't have that black seasoned look to it. I'm guessing I just have to keep cooking fatty foods?


Also, is it ok to use metal cooking utensils on this thing? Or will it scratch the seasoned layer (once I form one)?
I agree with the others, you didn't season it correctly, that's why you are having problems. Just cooking fatty food is not the correct way. Re-read what frick first posted and do that.
 

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that I just bought? I scoured the crap out of it with soap and hot water. Then I put some lard in it and heated it up on low heat for about 20 mins, rubbing the fat into the pan. I thought that this was enough to season it.


No....soap


http://www.lodgemfg.com/use-care-seasoned-cast-iron.asp







I also cook lots of bacon in mine, I also use layer of oil when blackening things which further seasons it. Just follow lodge here.





Re-Seasoning your Lodge Cast Iron

While maintaining the seasoning (as in Step 5 above) should keep your Cast Iron in good condition, at some point you may need to repeat the seasoning process. If food sticks to the surface, or you notice a dull, gray color, repeat the seasoning process:

Wash the cookware with hot, soapy water and a stiff brush. (It is okay to use soap this time because you are preparing to re-season the cookware).

Rinse and dry completely.

Apply a thin, even coating of MELTED solid vegetable shortening (or cooking oil of your choice) to the cookware (inside and out).

Place aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to catch any dripping.

Set oven temperature to 350 – 400 degrees F.

Place cookware upside down on the top rack of the oven.

Bake the cookware for at least one hour. After the hour, turn the oven off and let the cookware cool in the oven.

Store the cookware uncovered, in a dry place when cooled.
 

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Yeah, they aint got Taco bell or Del taco in Canidiah, I hear.
 

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That man wants to make a taco or burrito or something messican to eat.
All I'm sayin' is, people need to know their limits. There's plenty of things I'm not good at:

Basketball
Playing the Piano
Swimming
Competitive Eating
Monopoly
Motorcycle Troubleshooting
Wii

I accept those. I stay off the court, out of the water, and I keep the gorram controller out of my hand. I'm not good at it. I move on.
 

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Ah, but you can try to get better at something.

I find it admirable for someone to try to get good at something they're not, as it's harder than to get better at something you're already good at. Though it depends on how you go about doing it...
 
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