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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at doing some work to my bike, 2001 SV650S. I have tons of experience with automobiles. However, none with motorcycles. I just worry because I have no experience with these and I know everything needs to be perfect.

I was thinking of bringing it to a local shop and let them do the work, but thats a little expensive.

Work I am looking to do:
Change Springs and fork oil
Fix/replace choke cable
Fix Low Fuel light not coming on when low fuel
Remove front and rear wheels to have new tires put on

Just curious how hard this stuff is to do (with the proper haynes manual) myself, or if I am better off just taking it to a shop and having them do it all?
 

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You'll pay much more at a shop than you would if you do it yourself, plus it's fun working on the bike!

You can probably find how-tos and miscellaneous advice for all of those things right here on this forum, too.
 

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Easy stuff with basic hand tools, the manual and some previous know how.

Invest in some stands for your bike so you can take the tires and suspension off.
 

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It's super easy except for low fuel light (I have no experience with it, it may be easy too) if you have a standard rear stand and a front stand that supports the neck.

The fanciest thing you'll need is a torque wrench.

Your choke is actually an enrichment circuit in the carb. If it's running weird, check the little screw that holds the cables going into each carb. If it backed out, that allows the little stopper at the end of the cables to pull from the fuel passage hole. You can do that on the bike, just lift tank and remove airbox.

For the fork oil, I use a shortcut not in the procedures in the manual or posted in the FAQ. With the front wheel off and axel out and the caps still on the forks, you can break the nut that holds the damper rod at the bottom by putting a little upward force on the fork while jerking the allen. When it breaks loose, it's easy to remove (just remember that there's a crush washer in there to not lose). Fork fluid will come out. Remove the fork caps and pump a little to get the rest out. It's not perfect but it beats taking the entire fork off and pulling it apart.

The spring is easy as dropping the new one back in after refilling the fork. If you have the metric sockets and hex keys, everything you listed should take 2 or 3 beers.

Fuel light I'm not sure about as I've never had to mess with it.
 

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I've done three of the things you've mentioned with a manual and some help from this forum. If you can work on cars, you should be able to do this stuff.
 

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The fuel light problem may be a broken solder joint on the dual sender unit. There are actually two thermistors that make up the fuel sender. One is for blinking with maybe a gal left or less and a solid light for very low. Check the wiring first. Does the light come on solid when very low or when you first turn the ignition on? If it does, you would need to remove the sender from the tank and check the solder joints.
 

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For the fork oil, I use a shortcut not in the procedures in the manual or posted in the FAQ. With the front wheel off and axel out and the caps still on the forks, you can break the nut that holds the damper rod at the bottom by putting a little upward force on the fork while jerking the allen. When it breaks loose, it's easy to remove (just remember that there's a crush washer in there to not lose). Fork fluid will come out. Remove the fork caps and pump a little to get the rest out. It's not perfect but it beats taking the entire fork off and pulling it apart.
Wait, what? That's not a shortcut at all. From the point you got to (axle out) it's only a few bolts to drop the forks out. Then you don't have to fuss around with the bolt in the bottom and worry about it sealing again when you put it back together. It is also much easier to measure oil level with the forks out and collapsed.

You don't have to take the forks apart to change the oil. Take off cap, tip upside down and compress many times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The fuel light problem may be a broken solder joint on the dual sender unit. There are actually two thermistors that make up the fuel sender. One is for blinking with maybe a gal left or less and a solid light for very low. Check the wiring first. Does the light come on solid when very low or when you first turn the ignition on? If it does, you would need to remove the sender from the tank and check the solder joints.
Yes, the light comes on when I first turn on the bike. It is when it is obviously low that it does not.
 

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So, the bulb is okay but the light never comes on at all, not blinking or solid? Check the connector at the sensor first for corrosion or looseness. Trace the wires,3, for any possible crimps or breaks if you can. The last resort would be to remove the sensor from the tank and inspect. Usually at least one of the circuits works.

If you have a meter, you could check for continuity from the gauge multipin connector (harness side) to the sensor connector for the fuel level wires: Black/light green and Red/Black plus the ground, B/W.
 

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If you can work on a car, you can work on a bike. Same principles apply, it's just 10x easier to get to everything on the bike!
 

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my fuel level sending unit had a crack in the solder of the wire flush with the bottom of the unit. i tried to re-solder, but had to replace to get the low fuel warning.
 

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I have tons of experience with automobiles. However, none with motorcycles.
this is exactly where i was when i got my 03. i downloaded a service manual and used my mechanical knowledge. i now know my bike like the back of my hand(getting the was tons of fun, seriously). the only thing i've EVER taken my bike to a shop for was to change tires, but have since then started doing my own.
 

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I have the same exact bike, im not a mechanic, but i do most of the service myself , including changing tires/balancing.

It's not rocket surgery you know.........
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have the same exact bike, im not a mechanic, but i do most of the service myself , including changing tires/balancing.

It's not rocket surgery you know.........
It's not that it is rocket surgery, but I just fear more of the "what if I didn't get that right..." when it comes to this stuff. I have a digital copy of the service manual now and ordered a hard copy as well, combined with the forum pros, I should feel confident.
 

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It's not that it is rocket surgery, but I just fear more of the "what if I didn't get that right..." when it comes to this stuff. I have a digital copy of the service manual now and ordered a hard copy as well, combined with the forum pros, I should feel confident.
I understand your concern..........BUT ,i honestly believe that
NOBODY will be as cautious about working on YOUR bike & making damm sure everything is done correctly, as the person who's life is on the line if done wrong........that would be YOU my friend.
P.M. me for any probs. ....i'll help if i can.
 

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Where are you located? If you are in my neck of the woods I could show you all that as I am doing the same things on my bike next week.

I am near Sacramento ,CA
 
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