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I was sick of paying $3 for 10 tortillas at the supermarket, so I decided to make my own. Yes, they are an exotic food up here in canucksville. Anyways, I follow this recipe I find online to the letter, mixed up the dough, kneeded it into little balls, and rolled them as thinly as possible. Then I heat up a dry skillet over medium high and drop them in.

Something is already wrong, they are not bubbling like they're supposed to. Oh well, I turn them over when each side is nice and browned, and low and behold they actually look like authentic tortillas. Until I try to eat one that is.

They are hard, and they taste like ass. Ok maybe not ass, but they taste like raw dough. They smell like raw dough. They looked cooked and any more time on the skillet would burn them. I'm really fustrated at this point, because it was a lot of work rolling them this thin. So I decide they can't go into the skillet anymore or they'll be hard as rocks. I wrap up a stack of them in tin foil and throw them into the oven for 300F, 30 minutes. They come out STILL smelling like dough and slightly harder then before. What the heck am I doing wrong? I kneeded that chit for 15 minutes, and let it sit for 10 to rise. The dough was slightly sticky, I thought it was the right consistency. Why do all the bread products I try to make end up tasting like flour and not bread??

And finally, does anyone know how to get the gross odor of burnt tortilla out of a microwave? :mad:
 

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hire one of us 'mericans to send you some tortillas in the mail. i can typically get about a hundred tortillas for a dollar. they are just about the cheapest food item available at the local grocery.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeast works by the fungus consuming the sugar in the mix. Its byproduct is carbon dioxide gas. This gas is what causes the dough to rise, via bubbles in the dough.

When the Pilsburry Doughboy's wife gets bloated, she REALLY bloats up.
so where does this yeast come from? The baking powder?
 

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tortillas are unleavened. no yeast involved.
 

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BTW, tortilla presses can be had for cheap.
 

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I was sick of paying $3 for 10 tortillas at the supermarket, so I decided to make my own. Yes, they are an exotic food up here in canucksville. Anyways, I follow this recipe I find online to the letter, mixed up the dough, kneeded it into little balls, and rolled them as thinly as possible. Then I heat up a dry skillet over medium high and drop them in.

Something is already wrong, they are not bubbling like they're supposed to. Oh well, I turn them over when each side is nice and browned, and low and behold they actually look like authentic tortillas. Until I try to eat one that is.

They are hard, and they taste like ass. Ok maybe not ass, but they taste like raw dough. They smell like raw dough. They looked cooked and any more time on the skillet would burn them. I'm really fustrated at this point, because it was a lot of work rolling them this thin. So I decide they can't go into the skillet anymore or they'll be hard as rocks. I wrap up a stack of them in tin foil and throw them into the oven for 300F, 30 minutes. They come out STILL smelling like dough and slightly harder then before. What the heck am I doing wrong? I kneeded that chit for 15 minutes, and let it sit for 10 to rise. The dough was slightly sticky, I thought it was the right consistency. Why do all the bread products I try to make end up tasting like flour and not bread??

And finally, does anyone know how to get the gross odor of burnt tortilla out of a microwave? :mad:
where the PHUCK in Canada are you that you cannot find tortilla's??? Seriously dude, I just bought some the other night and cooked me up some nice seasoned ground turkey and veggies and rolled them bad boys up.
BTW, I'm in Toronto and we have tortillas, want me to mail you some?
 

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I'm gonna bet you didn't cook them in an iron skillet.

==> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDegTyqL55o

Chewy Flour Tortillas

These tortillas have real body and taste; they are perfect for gorditas, fajitas and eating out of hand.

* 2 cups all-purpose flour
* 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
* 3/4 cup lukewarm milk (2% is fine)

Stir together the flour and baking powder in a large mixing bowl. Add the salt and vegetable oil to the lukewarm milk and whisk briefly to incorporate. Gradually add the milk to the flour, and work the mixture into a dough. It will be sticky.

Turn the dough out onto a surface dusted with flour and knead vigorously for about 2 minutes (fold and press, fold and press). The kneading will take care of the stickiness. Return the dough to the bowl, cover it with a damp cloth, and let it rest for 15 minutes. (This dough will not rise, but it needs a rest.)

Divide your dough into 8 balls of equal size, cover them, and let them rest again for about 20 minutes. Avoid letting them touch, if you don't want them to stick together.

Dust your work surface with flour. Working one at a time, remove each piece of dough and pat it into a 5-inch circle. With a rolling pin, roll out the tortilla, working from the center out, until you have a 7- or 8-inch tortilla a little less than 1/4 inch thick. Transfer the tortilla to a hot, dry skillet or griddle. It will begin to blister. Let it cook for 30 seconds, turn it, and let the other side cook for 30 seconds. Remove the tortilla, place it in a napkin-lined basket and cover with aluminum foil. Repeat for the remaining tortillas.

Although flour tortillas, like corn tortillas, are best if eaten right after they are made, these tortillas will freeze well. Wrap them tightly in plastic, and they will keep, frozen, for several weeks. To serve tortillas that have been frozen, let them thaw and come to room temperature, then wrap them in aluminum foil and heat them in a warm oven. Microwaving tends to toughen them.

Here are some tips as to technique:

* Do not use bread flour. You want flour with a low gluten content.
* You don't want to over-flour your work surface, but you don't want your rolled-out tortilla sticking to it either. I found that the dough adhered less to an unvarnished wood surface (like an old cutting board) than any other surface I tried.
* A flat dough scraper, known in baking parlance as a "bench knife", is very efficient in removing the rolled-out tortilla from the work surface.
* When rolling out tortillas, dust your rolling pin with flour, and don't be afraid to apply pressure. Flour tortilla dough is pretty sturdy; but not to the point of rerolling. You don't want tough tortillas.
* The Border Cookbook recommends the use of a tortilla roller (similar to a short piece of broomstick), rather than a rolling pin.
* Rolling out tortillas in perfect circles is harder than it sounds; the dough wants to draw up. So if perfectly circular shapes are important, you can trim away the excess with a sharp knife.
* Once again, I believe a cast-iron skillet or griddle is practically indispensable for making any kind of tortilla. A dry cast-iron utensil, unlike most other materials, can take high temperatures over a sustained period of time without being adversely affected, although you may have to do a reseasoning afterwards (see How to Love Your Cast-Iron Skillet).

Once you get a rhythm going, you can roll out a tortilla, put it on to cook and, while it cooks, roll out your next tortilla. Seems like an arduous process but, with this method, I could produce 8 tortillas in about 10 action-packed minutes. Be sure to rewrap your fresh tortillas each time you add another to the stack.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
that is the exact recipe i used, except I substituted the milk for water. I don't have a cast iron skillet. I used a heavy stainless steel skillet that I usually use for steaks. I stopped flouring them halfway through because the dry flour would stick to the skillet and start to burn.

I had a great idea though, I'll try a few different methods and only use enough dough to make 1-2 tortillas. that way I'm not stuck with an inedible stack like I am now.
 

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You've got to get yourself a nice iron skillet if you wanna do them right. Get yourself a nice Lodge Logic or Emeril pan.

 

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That looks like a great site and all. I think he's making flour tillas not corn.^^
Or am I wrong?

Maybe I missed it, but having traveled in Mexico and being someone who really enjoys authentic Mexican food, flower tortillas never even crossed my mind. I hope anyone who checks out that site enjoys it.
 

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Get a cast iron skillet. Cook everything in it. You're totally ******* your steaks by cooking them in SS. If you can't grill it, skillet!

oh my god...i cant believe i just said that.
 
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