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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the two header screw on my exhaust is not screwed all the way in. Is it supposed to be this way? Any harm in me screwing it all the way down?

I just took my bike in for its 600 mile maintanence.....if this was a problem, shouldn't they have seen it?
 

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Yes, they should all be fully in and torqued to 15 ft/lbs ( if I remember correctly). I skipped this step on doing my own 600 mile service (dumb) and only recognized the problem after bike started backfiring. It was doing so because the header bolts were all loose or gone (3 loose, one gone). The Leo Vince exhaust has thicker flanges and they did not use longer bolts OR loctite any of them when dealer installed pipes. I ordered "proper" bolts from dealer, which were wrong and ultimately found my own and put them in myself.

I reinstalled them with red loctite and they still came loose after only a few rides. THIS is a gripe with Leo Vince, however, not dealer or Suzuki, but I had to get crafty for the solution.

I wanted to safety wire the bolts, so I would not have ANY loosening problem, whatsoever. Front bolts are easy, but rear bolts are a bitch to access and would not be easy to safety wire in normal terms. I bought new bolts which are longer, to more fully utilize depth of mounting hole. Before installing I cut slots in head of bolt to act as castellations that wire could be tied over. That is, looking at bolt head straight on, there is a 2mm deep slot at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock. I then installed bolts, with loctite and torqued them. With safety wire, I wrapped wire behind the exhaust flange and up/over bolt head so that wire lay in two of the slots I had cut. From here, I twisted safety wire up like normal, which has held bolts fine for quite a few miles.

This has a couple advantages over traditional safety wiring. A) I didn't have access to drill press to drill holes through bolt heads and this method didn't require it. Vise and dremel tool did the work. B) For rear bolts, it would be hard to get wire through hole in bolt, but castellations gave me several options for best fit.

Whether you want to do this or not, here's some good tips to access rear bolts.

1) Remove seat, pull tank, pull up rubber flap so you can look straight down onto the rear bolts. You still can't get any wrenches in there from this angle, but you can see what you are doing.

2) Buy or borrow a set of wobble extensions for your 3/8" socket set and a 6mm allen driver to fit bolts. Wobble extensions offer enough "flex" that you can just stack a bunch of them up, feed the assembly up along brake side of rear swingarm and guide bit into bolt head from above. I found the well-used universal joint I had was too loose and was tough to get wrench into bolt head as it flopped around.

In closing, you could take it back and gripe at dealer, as well you should. It will probably not be the last/only time they come loose, however, so you may wish to be prepared to do it yourself. Doing it yourself, you can make sure it is done right and take the extra time to do the safety wire to make sure they don't ever come loose again.

Good luck. Email me if you need a picture of finished product. [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks man....

Sorry to hear of your troubles with your bolts. If anything you can feel better knowing that you didn't pay 160 dollars to a dealer who in all liklihood never even looked at them, much less torqued them down. My issues reside on the front bolts. I looked after I noticed my pipe sounded wierd on idle a couple of days ago.

I really appreciate this breakdown.
 
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