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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a while ago I threw in a 1300r shock (listing stated 99-07 so fuck if I know the exact year). At the time I knew nothing about suspensions at all other than the shitty flip-up fender eliminator I bought the bike with kept coming into contact with the tire seriously fucking with my plate so I needed to fix it. So I bought the shock and a fixed eliminator. Now I'm rebuilding my front forks and I've educated myself a bit more about bike suspensions (at least enough to know it should be tuned for my weight) but I have no idea where to look for adjusting the busa shock. I did the racetech suspension calc on an 06 busa using rider weight to calculate the difference in bike weight and the recommended springs were only slightly less than 1kg/mm from stock (earlier models I'm lead to believe have a looser spring so the real difference could be even closer) so I'm gonna leave the spring alone. My question is should I loosen everything (rebound/dampener/pre-load) and just tighten pre-load down till I'm at the sag I want? I have no clue where to even start looking for this, I found a vid that said the busa stock rebound is 12 clicks from the tightest on the bottom screw with the dampener screw being 8 clicks from tightest so I planned to go to that then just adjust pre-load for sag. But I'm certain there's better settings for those screws for my k6 I just don't know where to look.
 

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Don't think you're going to find what you're looking for. The Hayabusa weighs over 100 pounds more, if you're looking at springs have you adjusted for that? Are the suspension links (dog bones) the same length for both bikes? Is the shock length between the bikes the same? Likely not so that will make a difference, longer or shorter links will change the leverage on the shock, think about what you learned in geometry, Somewhere in the middle for rebound & compression is a good starting point. There might be a part number on the shock, with that you could find what year it came from.

Never heard of anyone buying a shock to fix a tag/tire interference problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Don't think you're going to find what you're looking for. The Hayabusa weighs over 100 pounds more, if you're looking at springs have you adjusted for that? Are the suspension links (dog bones) the same length for both bikes? Is the shock length between the bikes the same? Likely not so that will make a difference, longer or shorter links will change the leverage on the shock, think about what you learned in geometry, Somewhere in the middle for rebound & compression is a good starting point. There might be a part number on the shock, with that you could find what year it came from.

Never heard of anyone buying a shock to fix a tag/tire interference problem.
I weighed significantly more than I do now (part of the reason I didn't care what it was set to). I was already changing sprockets, and installing a fixed plate holder, so I figured why not stiffen the shock while I'm down there to ensure the plates are fine.
 

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I've heard of the busa shock swap, although it's not nearly as common as gsxr/zx swaps just because of availability. All are a compromise but it is probably better than the blown-out unit you replaced. Set it for sag and put rebound and compression in the mid-range. While it's certainly not designed for your bike (and everyone will tell you to go buy an Ohlins), it will get you by until you have money for a proper replacement.
Note that running a too-heavy spring can have the effect of bucking you off the bike regardless of where you set preload. If it's too heavy, it's just too heavy! Hopefully this one can be adjusted to suit, but be warned. Going over the bars isn't fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've heard of the busa shock swap, although it's not nearly as common as gsxr/zx swaps just because of availability. All are a compromise but it is probably better than the blown-out unit you replaced. Set it for sag and put rebound and compression in the mid-range. While it's certainly not designed for your bike (and everyone will tell you to go buy an Ohlins), it will get you by until you have money for a proper replacement.
Note that running a too-heavy spring can have the effect of bucking you off the bike regardless of where you set preload. If it's too heavy, it's just too heavy! Hopefully this one can be adjusted to suit, but be warned. Going over the bars isn't fun.
Thankfully I don't take it to tracks or ride like I should, so there isn't much bucking.
 
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