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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy,
My wife and I are going to take our SV's across the state in a couple weeks, and we're borrowing her dad's GMC 2500 diesel pickup to haul the bikes. There are not chocks installed in his pickup bed, and I'd like to avoid drilling holes in it for 2 chocks. It is feasable to use a "free-standing" chock placed against the front wall of the pickup bed, using the tie-downs to hold forward pressure? Or some other solution?

Thanks,
Jesse
 

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No need for a chock. Just push them right against the front of the truck bed.

I've moved 20 different bikes hundreds of times. Never used a chock in my life. Never had an issue. Quality tie downs, and bit of logic is all you need.
 

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I've made a "chock" out of a board that runs across the front of the bed with a couple pieces of 2x4 nailed to it to keep the wheels positioned in a particular way, and I've also done it without any type of chock using only the force of the tie-downs putting pressure on the front wheel against the bed wall to keep the bikes in place.
Sounds like you'll be ok with just the free-standing chock and the force from the tie-downs.

I'd recommend only using ratchet-straps though, not the cam-lock style.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the tips. Is there really no need for chocks at all? There's no risk of a bike's tires slipping out sideways? The truck does have a very nice (rough and grippy) bed-liner.
 

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I wouldn't say "no risk" chocks are better than no chocks. But i too have hauled with out them.
 

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In a pickup bed with ridges in the sheet metal, you can use the ridges as a way to locate the front wheels. Even without ridges though, you'll be fine.

Do yourself a favor and use a big, wide ramp. I've heard waaaaay too many horror stories of people dropping their bikes off the side of a narrow ramp.


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone. Long time rider, first time hauler :lmao: I feel much better about this now.

I've very excited to enjoy riding in the Black Hills without have to put 900 interstate-miles on my tires. (I live in Sioux Falls, SD.) :eek:ccasion14:
 

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does the bed have ridges that capture the front wheel? no need for a chock

or is it smooth (someone stuck some plywood on the bed) nail s couple of pieces of strapping to keep the front wheel from turning or slipping sideways

2 tiedowns from handlebar to points about 45° down and the same outward
preload with your weigh on seat, snug tie downs, get off bike

done
 

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If you can get it on sale, the HF tri-folding ramp (1500 lbs capacity) is nice and wide, but it does have some openings requiring careful foot placement and a good deal when on sale for around $80 or so.
+1 to the use of ratcheting straps. the cam buckles often slip.
Chocks are useful primarily to hold the bike upright while tightening things down. They can also help prevent side-to-side slippage.
Just place straps diagonally at each corner of the bike, pulling forward and to the side in front and backward to the side in the rear and you shouldn't have any slippage. Using a piece of plywood with some 2x4 cleats to prevent side-to-side slippage and four straps per bike to hold everything down tightly is the easiest, no-hole approach, but by checking the straps for tightness every-so-often, you can skip the plywood.
 

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I have slapped a few chocks on a 4x8 and slid that into my van when hauling dirt bikes. Easier to manage 2 bikes that way, and the clean up was much easier as well. Not so much an issue with a street bike ( hopefully). The big advantage using chocks is it's easier to keep upright when strapping, as has been mentioned, but you can also stagger them a bit so the bars have more clearance.
I always put a board across the front of the bed ( or the van cage ) ever since a buddy tweaked his pickup bed being over enthusiastic with ratchet straps.
 

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I have only trailered my bike one weekend and it was with another member on here (JPL_SV). 2 ratchet straps on each bikes triples pulling them against the front bar of the trailer was fine. If you want to be even more careful add a couple tie downs to the rear grab handle in each direction as well.
 

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I like the idea of a board that goes across the front of the bed with a chock or short boards fixed to it to prevent the wheel from turning. A lot of times the wheel is fine but it CAN turn and loosen everything up. Once that happens you will always be nervous if you don't stabilize it somehow.
 

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I've done a few thousand miles with a bike or two strapped down in pickups without chocks, mostly dirtbikes, but a lot with the SV and a half dozen other bikes. Oftentimes I only used 1 ratchet strap from each fork between the triples down to the tiedown points (both close to the forward end of the truck bed to pull the bike up against the front edge of the bed as well as hold everything down). 2 straps from each side on the front forks between the triples or handlebars and one through the back wheel would hold everything rock solid if you are really paranoid.

Regarding loading, try to find a spot where you can back the truck up against a hill (with the truck still level), this will lower the vertical difference and make it easier to push the bike in. I do suggest pushing it in though. I have seen lots of people ride up the ramp without issue, but I have also seen the aftermath of a few guys not making it.
 

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Do yourself a favor and use a big, wide ramp. I've heard waaaaay too many horror stories of people dropping their bikes off the side of a narrow ramp.

Better yet, back up to a hill, retaining wall, etc. and make the ramp shorter and more level. I've loaded my bike multiple times with very small "ramps" (scrap of plywood, truck tailgate) by using something near the height of my truck. Backing into a ditch also works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
For a ramp, my local dealer/service station has a huge ramp available for anyone to use free of charge. Still looking to see if such a thing is available in Rapid City (my destination).
 

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I've made a "chock" out of a board that runs across the front of the bed with a couple pieces of 2x4 nailed to it to keep the wheels positioned in a particular way.
^^^ what he said. all you need to do is insure the front wheel can't slip out under any kind of weird / diagonal loading. you'll be fine!
 
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