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Discussion Starter #1
So I have to get new tires. Its $40 each to get them put on if the tires are on the bike, $20 if they are off. Obviously I want to take the tires off my bike and save myself $40. My problem is I don't have stands.

Looking in my garage, the roof truss's are supported down the center by a steel "I" beam going across the garage to the walls. I want to "hang" my bike off this beam and remove the tires. I figure the beam can easily take the weight. Snow and ice in the winter has to weigh far more than the bike does.

What are some safe hoist points on an '02 SV naked ????? I was looking at the rear footpegs and where they bolt on don't seem that hefty. Am I just being paranoid. They must be designed to hold at least 200 lbs each of downforce ..... not sure about upwards though.

I'll make a jig out of 2x4 to support the swingarm in the back similar to what a stand would do ... and probably be using 4 rachet ties to lift the bike off the ground.

Any other suggestions?
 

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For the rear I just use some wooden blocks, its stable and easy. For the front I hang it by underneath the steering stem with a zip tie, err, I mean a strap.
 

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2x4 under the bungie tie-down rails, and hooks under the top triple clamp. Get some ratcheting tie-downs, and hoist 'er up. When I changed my shock, I used the 2x4 under the rails trick. Worked perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I plan on making stands soon. I just haven't had the time. My dad has a regular welder and a wire feed one. Plus he has a bunch of scrap steel kicking around. Sometime this fall I plan on making myself a pair of stands. The only issue is they live 4 hrs away so its not something I can work on an hour here and there. I have to go and dedicate a weekend to it. I could just get some stands .... but I think making my own would be a fun project. Ideally I'd like to make them adjustable so they will work w/ any of my bikes.
 

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if you hang the bike from points that sit below center of gravity of the bike like swingarm... the bike will likely be very unstable and could topple over easy. I suggest just wrapping a heavy duty tie down through the rear subframe like through the 2 loops that are used for rear luggage tie downs. then do same near the triples up front. Much more secure.

I did this with mine when I replaced the rear shock and preload caps. My garage rafters held it fine. ;)
 

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use ratchet straps

for the front use the forks between the triple clamps or the handlebars close to the clamp.

for the rear use the frame or between the subframe keeping close to the mounts.
 

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Uh... word of warning from an architect here... throwing a bungee around a garage rafter (rafters which are usually built to minimum load-bearing standards) creates a point load on whichever particular load bearing member you have chosen. This is a bad thing. While it may work for some doesn't mean it will work for all. It depends highly on the construction of your particular garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I understand your concern and wouldn't do it from a single roof truss. In my garage all the roof truss's are supported in the center via a steel 'I' beam the goes wall to wall. That is what I will be picking the bike with.
 

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Save yourself even more money by buying a big-ass set of tire irons. It's really not that bad of a job.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
orangegilly said:
2x4 under the bungie tie-down rails, and hooks under the top triple clamp. Get some ratcheting tie-downs, and hoist 'er up. When I changed my shock, I used the 2x4 under the rails trick. Worked perfectly.
The wood and hooks cost me under $10 at Lowes. This worked great. Great DIY trick. I'd do it again too when I have to clean the chain again. It was very stable, not tippy at all. I did make a groove for the rails to sit in just to be sure it wouldn't slide. My helper in the back helped me by killing any spiders or bugs out in the garage. The ugly green carpet was in the living room when I bought the house. I ripped it out before I even moved in. It is nice to work on in the garage though. Keeps stuff off the dirty floor and a little easier on the knees. I'd suggest an old carpet to anyone to work off of.



 
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