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It is normal for the fuel light to turn on briefly when the gauge powers up, it is a self test to be sure the bulb is ok.

At this point it looks like the problem is inside the gauge. Being that wiggling the connector brings power back I would start by reflowing the solder at the gauge connector pins. It is easy to get to the connector, just remove the screws on the back, the gauge opens right up and you can lift the circuit board out.

If you do not have a solder iron, something like this will work fine, $20 on Amazon.

Edit: Before going the resolder route, do a careful visual inspection of the sockets and pins of the gauge connector (male and female). It is possible the problem is a worn socket(s) on the gauge connector (harness side) or could be corrosion. That is the last thing to check before concluding the problem in on the gauge circuit board.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
It is the guage cluster its self i replaced it and the new one works fine. Is there a common issue with these clusters?
 

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Glad you got it working. (y)

Gauge failure like this is not common on the SV650 gen1. Was this bike ever crashed? Did you try reflow the solder joints at the gauge connector? Since both tach and speedo fail at the same time due to loss of power the problem is likely close to where power enters the gauge.

If you haven't tried to fix the old gauge I would give it a try. Could be an easy fix and you would then have a backup. Nothing to lose.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
How might i be able to fix it? I suspect its the pins on it themselves. Also it was dropped on its side before i got it.
 

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How might i be able to fix it? I suspect its the pins on it themselves.
The brute force method is simply reflow the solder on the connector pins on the PC board plug (pay special attention to the power and grounds), see if the problem goes away.

The more finesse approach is use an ohm meter to measure the resistance at each pin/socket to see if any are making poor contact. This is the best way as it is better to clearly identify the problem before fixing, that way you know for certain what the problem was and that it is surely fixed.

To measure pin/socket resistance, remove the screws at the back of the gauge, open the plastic, remove the bare board. Plug the bare board into the bike harness then use an ohm meter to measure resistance across each of the 16 pin/socket connections. Do this with power Off. You should see less than 1 ohm at each location. If resistance is more than 1 ohm then that pin/socket has a problem and would need cleaning or replacement.

If none of the pins/socket locations show a failure then the problem is on the PC board itself. If the problem is on the PC board then use the meter to follow the traces from the connector to various spots on the board, again, pay special attention to the power and grounds.

Good luck.
 
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