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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks alot. i appreciate the help. ever since i got the bike, the steering didnt feel right...almost like the front shocks were too soft. seems to take alot more effort to get it to turn at low speeds. also the the nose seems to dive down really badly if you dont let off the throttle real easy when coming to a stop. think ill adjust the front first, and worry about the rear later.
 

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Do set the preload first, front and rear. That may not help. If it doesn't, then you have some ride height adjustment to do.

Depending on the year GSXR shock it could be shorter than the original shock. What you're describing sounds like you've lowered the rear end relative to the front (shorter shock). This increases straight line stability but makes turn-in more sluggish. You can raise the fork tubes in the triple clamps to lower the front relative to the rear. Try 5mm at first and then steps of 3mm until it feels right for you. Don't lower the front too much or you may wind up with fender/radiator banging together on bumps or heavy braking. The limit is around 15mm, if I recall correctly. Check this out.

The referenced article is a good method for setting preload. However, I always take issue with the statement that less sag/more preload is a stiffer setting. Preload sets only ride height (and so the position of the suspension in its stroke). It doesn't change anything else.

Example: Suppose you've got a 50#/inch spring, preload 2", total load on that fork leg 150#. (2" preload X 50#/inch + 1" sag X 50#/inch) = 150#, so you'll have 1" of sag. To compress the forks an additional inch takes an additional 50#.

Let's crank the preload up to 2 1/2". (2 1/2" preload X 50#/inch + 1/2" sag X50#/inch) = 150#, so you'll have 1/2" sag, the bike will ride 1/2" higher. It still takes an additional 50# to compress the forks an additional inch.

So nothing changes but the ride height, which is important enough. There is no valid reason to change the preload between street and track.
 

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Sounds like you put a rear shock on, making the rear stiffer (probably better for your weight), but left the Front Forks stock and/or the fork springs are too soft for your weight.. This makes the weight of the bike come down on the front to hard, and causes diving and poor handling (turn initiating)

confirm your spring rate to weight and Check your Sag (front & rear)
 

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I've found that preload is ok but, at least for me, where you really see a change is your compression and rebound and theres no better way to set that than ride from full soft (-) up one past what feels best to you then one click down.
 

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Anyone want a copy of Suspension 101 - Traxxion Dynamics by Max McAllister?

It's almost 4,000,000 characters, so 'd have to break it up to post it. If you want it, pm me with a request and an e-mail address to send to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i bought the bike like this. i rode a stock 98 gsxr 600 before. i love the bike. i still have the stock rear shock, but it is not adjustable. sounds like i need to start by softening the rear first what do u think?
 

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Soften the rear set your sag then go all the way to soft on on your other adjustments. The 1000 spring is probably to heavy for you I am 150 and have an 04-05 GSXR 600 rear shock and its perfect for my weight. Do you know what year your 1k shock is? If is an 01-03 its good if its anything else its to heavy.
 
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