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Great article, YOU DONT HAVE TO CRASH! And its not a given "when " for everyone. Wish more poeple could think like this.
 

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Morpheous said:
Great article, YOU DONT HAVE TO CRASH! And its not a given "when " for everyone. Wish more poeple could think like this.
I read it more like - some people find their limits, respect them, and have enough luck. Others find them - ignore them - and pay. Others find them - recognize - and attempt to expand, sometimes paying for it. Not everyone crashes - but who does and who doesn't isn't up to the individual.
 

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Good read......... and pretty much how I like to look at riding........ its not how fast you get to the destination......... but the trip itself that we are doing what we are doing........ if that makes any sense :-\
 

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some people ride fast and are in control. Some people just ride fast. There is an ability level that is reached and when respected can be a beautiful thing. Some people (most people) push thier limits and make mistakes, but theres nothing saying that these mistakes are made by everyone, some people just learn from them.
 

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Remember this the next time you see "Chicken Strips" on someones tires. Instead of giving the rider a hard time, maybe we should be praising the rider for knowing and adhering to their abilities and limits. Yes, I have 3/4' to 1' strips, and I do find it annoying when people comment about it, because it is typically some RUB who has little time in the saddle or has purchased a high performance machine which tends to compensate for their lack of ability (to a point). I may not be a fast in the corners, but I've been riding safely for over 20 years.

jonesy
 

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jonesy said:
Remember this the next time you see "Chicken Strips" on someones tires. Instead of giving the rider a hard time, maybe we should be praising the rider for knowing and adhering to their abilities and limits. Yes, I have 3/4' to 1' strips, and I do find it annoying when people comment about it, because it is typically some RUB who has little time in the saddle or has purchased a high performance machine which tends to compensate for their lack of ability (to a point). I may not be a fast in the corners, but I've been riding safely for over 20 years.

jonesy
fook that, im flaming him until he cries *YOUR NOT A MAN! LOOK AT THOSE 3 INCH CHICKEN STRIPS! OMFG SOMEBODY GET ME SOME GRAVY OR KETCHUP FOR THOSE MOTHERFOOKERS!*

just kidding :)
 

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Ruefus said:
I read it more like - some people find their limits, respect them, and have enough luck. Others find them - ignore them - and pay. Others find them - recognize - and attempt to expand, sometimes paying for it. Not everyone crashes - but who does and who doesn't isn't up to the individual.
I thought he was saying it IS up to the individual. The ones who are smart enough to know their limits and ride within them don't crash. The others do. That it was OK to push your limits (and that the smart guys do this at the TRACK) - but not exceed them. The key is to RECOGNIZE when you're getting close to the limit - when you realize your lines are getting bad and you're making increasingly more mistakes and get that feeling in your gut (you know the one) - and back it down a notch.

Of course, all this doesn't take into account things completely beyond your control - like animals bolting out in front of you, debris on the road, cars pulling out in front of you, etc. Those kinds of things are truly NOT up to the individual - if they choose to ride.

Great article!
 

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I've read this article a number of times in the past and think it's always worth another read. I think what it is saying is that the people who don't crash don't crash because they know the limits of each situation and of their limits in that situation.

For me, when I start trail braking into corners, I'm pushing too close to the edge. The 'butt clencher' is a sign that that edge has been crossed and I've been lucky. I almost never have a butt clencher on roads I've ridden before. And my butt clenches earlier on new roads that I don't know than on roads I know fairly well. I use it like a crash-o-meter.

I think he was talking a lot about common sense too. In a blind corner you've never ridden before, you probably don't want to go in grinding pegs. On a new wide open curve lighted to show it's clean, you may feel safe to hammer through.
 

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Hey...good article...really like the homage to Any Given Sunday too...anyone else catch that...


"It might happen on any ride, on any Sunday. "
 

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great article......the MSF recommends not riding "over your head" and to minimize your risks while riding. Ego can play a part in "tipping" you over the other side..which will lead to a get-off.......riding safe to ride another day is my motto. :D
 

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scoober78 said:
Hey...good article...really like the homage to Any Given Sunday too...anyone else catch that...

"It might happen on any ride, on any Sunday. "
Yeah, I thought of that too... but actually, it's closer than you think. The title of the movie is "On Any Sunday" - not "Any Given Sunday" ;)

 
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