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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have been reading these forums almost everyday now. (I haven't been posting as much since I don't really have experience with working on bikes. And I feel like i can't really contribute to the knowledge pool).

But as I read these forums, I am beginning to think that I can start working on my own bike. And that if I have any problems, I can just post it and I will get help. So I am really glad I found these forums and for giving me the confidence on working on the bike. I am going to work on my bike, and hopefully post my progress and show the adventures of someone working on their bike for the first time.

I haven't really done much work on the bike. Mostly just bolt on stuff. (I will post pics later. My card reader isn't working for some reason at the moment). Off the top of my head, I have added frame sliders, holeshot fly screen, zuki OEM fender eliminator, corbin seat, and loe vince slip on. But I recently bought the service manual which also gave me more confidence to do grittier work.

Today (weather permitting), I am going to add a 12volt adapter for my GPS. :p
(I know I know, really simple stuff. But I have to take baby steps)

This weekend/next weekend I am going to install new sprockets and chain.

Down the line, I hope to: do my own oil change, install springs/oil, and new rear shock.

Anyway, sorry for the long post, but how did you guys start working on your bike?

Thanks!

Erik "Hopefully a future wrench monkey"
 

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1. take apart
2. put back together wrong and/or break something
3. take apart again to replace broken parts and tools
4. repeat until it is right

seriously, though, the best advice i have is get a service manual, follow it very carefully and use the proper tools. ask for help if you think you need it.

most of the issues i have had working on my own vehicles over the last 15+ years has been related to trying to use the wrong tools to do a job or not following a service manual exactly.
 

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Lifer
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Flippin' awesome man :)

I got the confidence to work on my bike from reading on here too (and half tearing apart my last car lol. money and the lack thereof can be one heck of a motivating force when your baby isnt' running right).

A lot of the things on the bike are REALLY easy to work on. Get the maintenance stuff under your thumb and you'll save tons of money. :D

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
seriously, though, the best advice i have is get a service manual, follow it very carefully and use the proper tools. ask for help if you think you need it.
I actually do have the service manual. I have been reading it front to back numerous times. The main reason I haven't really worked on anything is because I don't have torque wrenches yet. But I plan on buying some this weekend.;D


A lot of the things on the bike are REALLY easy to work on. Get the maintenance stuff under your thumb and you'll save tons of money. :D

Good luck!
Thanks! Yeah. When reading the service manual and reading the posts, I figured if other people can do it, why can't I? (Of course, people probably have a ton more experience than me, but I gotta start somewhere)

You actually live pretty close to me. I might call you to help me pick up my bike if it falls on me. haha.
 

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Lifer
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Thanks! Yeah. When reading the service manual and reading the posts, I figured if other people can do it, why can't I? (Of course, people probably have a ton more experience than me, but I gotta start somewhere)

You actually live pretty close to me. I might call you to help me pick up my bike if it falls on me. haha.
Dude, everyone up here in MD is helpful and willing. Hit up the "official MD thread" if you ever have a question and one of us bums will help you. :)

You're right on the other side of that demon bridge lol. (though it's gotten a lot better with the new bridge setup).

I had NO experience working on bikes when I bought mine over a year ago. I had a basic tool set from my car and got to working on the bike.
 

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As r3t1awr3rd (Wally) said, you can come to my place if you need any help. I live about an hour away and have regular "Maintenance Days" at my house--a bunch of us get together and we change tires, chains, sprockets, etc.

There are also lots of good guys near to you that can help if you just ask. Nudist (Nate) lives about half an hour away from you. You'd be hard pressed to meet a nicer guy. I'm not sure how useful he could possibly be in working on the bike though...I mean, he's only building his third (or so) SV and he works in his brother's high-end car resto shop...

I have no clue how many thousands of dollars have been saved by everybody because I've bought a few hundred dollars' worth of tools over the past few years.

Look at the bike as a bunch of small things. Work on one at a time. Take pics BEFORE you take it apart and look at the pics to help you put it back together.

BUY A MANUAL. As of yet, I don't use one, but I haven't found that I've needed it, because I'm fairly good with tools. I do have one on CD if I ever need to look at it.

Feel free to PM me with any questions you have. I often come across as a hard ass on this forum, but I do like to help those that ask.
 

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Welcome to the garage!
+1 on this advice.
Shop manuals, available on line for free, are indispensable for the more complicated tasks, and as a fallback when you forget how this all came apart.
Ask questions. Take your time.
Buy decent tools when you discover the need!
 

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+1 to what TBone said.

Don't go out and buy a bunch of tools.

Start a project. Buy the tools you need for it. The first jobs will require a basic 20-piece metric wrench set and some Allen wrenches.

Next time you have a job, buy the additional tools you'll need. You'll still need that first set, but for this job, you might need a 24mm wrench.

And so on. This way you get what you need, over time, and you don't break the bank.

And your gf/wife/fiance/SWMBO doesn't wring your neck for buying a bunch of (in her eyes) useless tools...
 
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