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Ok... so I hooked up my bottle to the actual fuel line. Doesn't start.

Hooked up my bottle to the vacuum line, gave it 1-2-3-missisipi to drain a bit. It starts, but dies in 2 secs (like the video above).

Disconnected the output hose from the fuel pump, cranked the engine. The pump is spitting fuel ergo the fuel pump works.

So looking at the vacuum hose, does it go into the cylinder directly? If it does, then I'm bypassing the carb.

The lack of start with the actual fuel line indicates that gas isn't being delivered so the problem is between the fuel pump and cylinder, likely at the carb?
When you get to servicing the carbs the Float heights and the Float Needle Valves are critical to correct operation. The service kit I used came with new FNVs and their seat that has an extra small gauze fuel filter in it. I also fitted an inline fuel filter to aid with stopping debris coming into the system,





 

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One thing occurred to me this morning. When hooking up your fuel bottle directly to the vacuum inlet at the base of the carb, you may have dumped fuel passed the rings, and into the crank case. Check your oil site glass for bubbles and oil level. Also, open your oil fill cap and sniff for gas smell. You might be fine, bit I'd check.

If you've not done it yet, an oil change and new filter would be a cheap insurance policy, nevertheless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
One thing occurred to me this morning. When hooking up your fuel bottle directly to the vacuum inlet at the base of the carb, you may have dumped fuel passed the rings, and into the crank case. Check your oil site glass for bubbles and oil level. Also, open your oil fill cap and sniff for gas smell. You might be fine, bit I'd check.

If you've not done it yet, an oil change and new filter would be a cheap insurance policy, nevertheless.
Makes sense; I'll change the oil when I get back. Gonna start reading over the howto you linked as well as the carbs video on YouTube. Many thanks for all the help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Afternoon everyone, happy Friday.

Looking at purchasing a rebuild kit so it can be there when I get home in 2 weeks. Is there a particular source you can recommend or is any generic ebay "sv650 carb kit" good enough; something like this, perhaps?

I've also found some videos of carburetor removals; but not so much carb rebuilds so far other than the one below. Haven't watched it yet but it may be helpful as well.


Looking well ahead; what is the best procedure for testing my carb rebuild? I imagine I have to button things nearly all the way before I try to start it. Is that right?
 

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Good video, and the same guy has another.

Your best resources will be posts right here on SVR regarding carb rebuilding. They are voluminous. Also, keep your service manual at your side. It will get you back on track if you stray.

One point I found stressed by the experts here on SVR is you cannot get the carbs too clean. In your video above, the guy seemed to spray the carb bits like you would spray Windex to clean a window. This is helpful in your first go-round to get caked stuff off. But, make sure you put the little red hose on the carb cleaner nozzle. And use it to spray every little opening you find. If it is round like a port, spray it with heavy jets of cleaner. While you are spraying all of the ports/venturis, look for the spray to be exiting somewhere. Most of them will have an exit. Make sure the spray has a nice strong stream at the exit.

Next, blow all of the holes with compressed air. Lastly, do this all over again, just to make sure nothing was left behind. Oh, also wear safety glasses. I know this from experience. Carb cleaner is a bitch in your eyes.

In terms of the kit, the standard ebay kits are what I used with no problems. The kit you linked to looks fine.

One more thing. You will probably find a lot of the screws are very tight. And it doesn't help that the screw material is very weak. You can spring for some JIS screwdrivers. But I had success with Dorman Screw Grab. I think RecoilRob recommended it to me, and it really helped.
Dorman Screw Grab
Good luck, and keep us updated.
 

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Usually any carbureted bike that sits for any length of time will have problems. Spraying cleaner isn't likely to have any impact, there are several small passages in the carburetors that can get stopped up. Check your oil level, with the amount of gas you lost when the gas was hooked up it may have ended up in the crankcase with the oil. If the oil is over filled and smells like gas it needs to be changed.

Probably time to pull the carburetors. take pictures, refer to the manual, make notes and go slow. You should be able to clean be careful spraying cleaner, can cause the rubber gaskets swell making it challenging to reassemble. Once you do the first time it gets easier. Any rust in the tank? If so you will need to address that too.
 

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Afternoon everyone, happy Friday.
As per GEO's post I used an Ebay service kit here in the UK. Done over 4,000 miles since the rebuild and zero problems :)


Not all bits were used just the main ones like the brass seat+filter and O-rings and Float Needle valves. I'm lucky inasmuch as I have an Air-Compressor so can blow through carbs when required. I like to blast through the venturi with Carb cleaner first to remove gum several times and then Air blast.

They aren't that complex to service once you know the main bits like the Float height setting. Once all done and the bike is running well and after checking plugs I always re-check and balance my carbs as the icing-on-the-cake :)

Considering my 99 is now in it's 22nd year is still brings a smile to my face just how good the smooth power delivery and engine braking of these engines is once serviced and setup correctly :D

PS
I've never yet had to adjust the mixture control even with two different Slip-On exhausts. I've recently checked my plugs and then re-balanced my Carbs as I knew they had slipped a bit after the 4,000 miles. I was surprised that not only were my plugs gaps dead-on but even more so that they were almost spotless/carbon free but I do use a fuel cleaner/additive on a regular basis(Redex) which is similar to Seafoam/STP fuel/injector cleaners.

I would normally expect them to be Light-Tan but they looked almost brand new :D
 
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Any rust in the tank? If so you will need to address that too.
Yep Salty. After two months of troubleshooting and three carb rebuilds, my whole problem ended up being rust in the tank. Now I'm running as smooth as Straticus.
 

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They aren't that complex to service once you know the main bits like the Float height setting.
I must be a bonehead, because I still cannot figure out the process for setting float heights. I simply left them where they were.
I always re-check and balance my carbs as the icing-on-the-cake
Yes, be sure to leave an extra length of plugged hose on the vacuum line at the base of the front carb. Not a bad idea to also leave one on the rear carb. You can use these vacuum lines to balance the carbs.
I've never yet had to adjust the mixture control even with two different Slip-On exhausts.
Once you get the carbs apart, I'm curious if the mixture plugs are still in. If they are it's a good indicator that the bike was not modified much, and so hopefully, not thrashed. Like Straticus', mine were always at 3.5 turns, so I made no changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Thanks gentlemen, ended up ordering this kit instead, since the original link didn't ship to Canada. Thanks for the "screw grabber" tip @Geo Smith, I can pick it up locally.

@Salty Sway I'm gonna leave the tank till last, but definitely gonna investigate the rust.
 

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Yep, you can check out my two trouble-shooting threads. I seemingly went through everything for several months. Then I took care of the tank rust, and I have been running smoothly ever since. The reason I waited so long was my clear external fuel filter appeared perfectly clean. But nope. Good luck.

Update: Be sure not to start the engine with the rebuilt cabs if you have tank rust. Otherwise, you will be pulling the carbs again within 10 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Hey gents, a quick update.

After procrastinating for 3 months, I have the carbs out:

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Really, I was intimidated by the potential complexity of the taking the carbs out but the end it turned out that taking the plastic off took more time. Between the "Low carb diet", the shop manual and the Haynes manual it was pretty quick. I was also encouraged to stay on task because it was just below freezing in Vancouver!

Shout out to @Geo Smith for the doorman screw grab. Most things came apart pretty well except for the carb plunger screw up front. I managed to get it out but destroyed the plunger holder in the process:

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It looks like the plunger holder is part 13418-19F00 and can be purchased here: CARBURETOR PARTS SV650/S...

Curiously, while the diagram on that page identifies the screw as #44 it's not available in their parts list. Any idea what's going on there?

Anyway, I wanted to share this exciting progress. My goal to have the carbs cleaned up and rebuilt by the end of the year given the time off. Small steps.
 

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Nice work @dmitrym, you're well on your way. I've had good luck with Ron Ayers for parts (Screw #44). When you clean your carbs, make sure they are cleaner than clean. Follow ziptech's "Lo-Carb Diet" writeup to the letter. Make sure every passage allows a full stream of carb cleaner out of the other end when cleaning. If not, you'll be pulling them off again in short order. Ditto with rust in the tank. If you have any, which I doubt any gen1s out there does not, you'll be carb cleaning again. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Alright, so I've gotten most of the way through the disassembly. I can't figure out how to take the throttle stop screw off:

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The second issue I encountered is that the fuel lines are on there pretty dang good. I tried pliers and it wouldn't come off. Am I just not applying enough force?
 

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Try warming them with a Hairdryer to make them more pliable :)
 
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I cut the fuel lines between the carbs off and replaced them with the ultra-expensive Motion Pro gray stuff. The existing lines were 20 years old, and the Motion Pro line bends without kinking. And I replaced the existing crappy hose clamps with small, good quality zip ties. The mechanic at the Suzuki suggested this, and it made the process a lot easier. No problems since. Take pics of how they are strung together before removing.

Also, I'd suggest removing the carbs from the two brackets holding them together. It makes them much easier to work on. Just remember to take pics with your phone so you can put them back together. It's a PITA taking apart and reassembling, but you'll get it. You hove to hold open the throttles at certain points in the removal/assembly process to make it work.
 

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No worries. Good thing you're changing the fuel lines. Look at the dry rot. Get an Exacto knife and cut the rest off. Glad you took the two carbs out of their cage. Get some Motion Pro line and roll your own.
 
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