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Hi All,

TLDR: Looking for Suspension and Brakes upgrades recommendations.

I have a 2019 SV650 X and I'm wanting to do some upgrades that will actually improve the quality of riding the bike. Everything I've read/heard is that SV's need improved front and rear suspension and better brakes. You can even see in MotoAmerica twins cup all the race prepped SV's have modifications done in these areas. Looking for recommendations for Front and Rear Suspension upgrades and brakes.

Front Forks:
Options for the Front Forks are either to keep the SV's stock forks and buy a cartridge kit (See Chris Parrish's Race Prepped SV) or do the GSXR front fork swap(which Alex Dumas did) which seems to be really popular for older models. But I don't know the fitment options for the GSXR forks. Also, searching on Revzilla I only find K-Tech Rear Shocks for fitting the SV650X. Admittedly, I don't know much at all about going down either of these routes. Additionally, the X model already has spring preload adjustable front forks. Are these a noticeable improvement over stock SV's or are they just dressed up like the rest of the SV?

I've seen this thread: Gen 3 Fork Swap
But the links that someone replied with are all dead.

Rear Suspension:
Similarly for the rear suspension, the options would be to buy a new replacement part or to use a used GSXR spring. I don't really know the pros and cons of these options or what the fitment would be for going the GSXR route.

Brakes:
I don't even know. The SV650X has ABS and a master cylinder, but its the same Tokicos. How do you go about upgrading?

I'd be looking at getting this work done at a shop (unless someone convinces me its really easy.) Does anyone know what I could expect to be paying?
 

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Forks:
Carts are good for the Gen3 and for most people will be more than enough performance. The newer fork legs have the nicer Tokico brakes so you don't need to worry about that. There are a few companies that do them, so find what is available. My pick is K-Tech or Matris.

Rear:
Again different options are out there depending on your budget and the result that you want. Everyone has an opinion on the way to go.

Brakes:
Having the Tokicos makes your life a lot easier. Braided lines and nice pads are all you need to be able to stop quite quickly.

How much you're going to pay depends on what you want to do and where you go. I normally suggest getting an actual suspension tech to do your suspension setup, you're more likely to get a setup which is going to do what you need.
 

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Forks: the gen. 3 preload adjustable 2019 forks are a very marginal improvement over the non-adjustable 2017 ones.
I know because on my 2017 gen. 3 I had to replace the fork and mad the transition to the newer model, mainly to be able to mount 4-pot Tokico calipers instead of the original 2-pot ones.
The improvement, as I said, is really marginal: yes, you get a barely noticeable better control over fork dive when braking, but that's not enough. The fork is still too soft and the bike nosedives a lot when you apply more than moderate front brake.
I'm planning to have a set of fork cartridges (Mupo Caliber 22) fitted in the very near future: I don't want to fiddle with springs and fork oil density to find a setting that I like (as you are supposed to do when installing emulators), and a complete front-end transplant would require me to change too many parts (wheel, brakes, etc.) besides the fact that in my neck of the woods it would make the bike no longer street legal and easily spottable.

Rear Shock: after some 10K miles I had to get rid of the original rear shock (had become too stiff and was not serviceable), and replaced it with a YSS one that is preload adn rebound adjustable, as well as 10mm adjustable for eye-to-eye lenght. For normal street riding I am more than satisfied with it.
I used a Gladius 2015 model, since it is completely interchangeable with a 2017 gen.3 SV: the Suzuki shop I asked informed me that they feature the same P/Ns.
Here you can read my whole experience with a YSS rear shock.

Brakes: as I wrote above, I now have 4-pot Tokico calipers, mated with braided steel lines and sintered (EBC FA HH) brake pads, and the improvement over the stock 2-pot calipers with stock pads and brake lines is HUGE.
For me the braking is now perfectly adequated to the bike, engine power and my riding style for street riding, not sure it would be for track riding, since I don't do track.

Hope this helps.
 
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Hi Bennette,

I have a 2017 SV and being a little big for the bike I began to search for options. When I reached out to Holeshot performance he was having some personal issues at the time and apologized and said he was unable to help me, but he said to call his guy at the company that does all of his suspension work, Cogent Dynamics, and ask for Todd. So I reached out to Cogent and was blown away by the time and attention I received, even though I could tell the shop was crazy busy. Shortly after I called them back and placed the order for a new rear shock assembly, and it was not a generic shock like an Ohlins or a K-tech but built to my weight and riding style etc. When I received it I was again impressed with he quality of the assembly, real good stuff. Cogent also makes a drop in valve assembly that converts the front forks into modern shocks and makes them much better, as well as fork tops that give you adjustment. Plus they sell them as a kit with the right spring and oil for you and your setup. I'll be ordering one of these soon. Again I'm very happy with the service and the product. I'm happy to give any more info or answer any questions if I can, hope this helps, and best of luck.

Cheers.

55013
 

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Hey, my 2C:
Before you go full on into replacing the brake system try upgrading your pads.
It made enough of a difference on my sfv for me not to bother going any further.
 

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Forks: the gen. 3 preload adjustable 2019 forks are a very marginal improvement over the non-adjustable 2017 ones.
I know because on my 2017 gen. 3 I had to replace the fork and mad the transition to the newer model, mainly to be able to mount 4-pot Tokico calipers instead of the original 2-pot ones.
The improvement, as I said, is really marginal: yes, you get a barely noticeable better control over fork dive when braking, but that's not enough. The fork is still too soft and the bike nosedives a lot when you apply more than moderate front brake.
I'm planning to have a set of fork cartridges (Mupo Caliber 22) fitted in the very near future: I don't want to fiddle with springs and fork oil density to find a setting that I like (as you are supposed to do when installing emulators), and a complete front-end transplant would require me to change too many parts (wheel, brakes, etc.) besides the fact that in my neck of the woods it would make the bike no longer street legal and easily spottable.

Rear Shock: after some 10K miles I had to get rid of the original rear shock (had become too stiff and was not serviceable), and replaced it with a YSS one that is preload adn rebound adjustable, as well as 10mm adjustable for eye-to-eye lenght. For normal street riding I am more than satisfied with it.
I used a Gladius 2015 model, since it is completely interchangeable with a 2017 gen.3 SV: the Suzuki shop I asked informed me that they feature the same P/Ns.
Here you can read my whole experience with a YSS rear shock.

Brakes: as I wrote above, I now have 4-pot Tokico calipers, mated with braided steel lines and sintered (EBC FA HH) brake pads, and the improvement over the stock 2-pot calipers with stock pads and brake lines is HUGE.
For me the braking is now perfectly adequated to the bike, engine power and my riding style for street riding, not sure it would be for track riding, since I don't do track.

Hope this helps.

how did you get the 4 pot calipers? was it easy to swap?
 

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Had to replace fork, it was bent due to an accident.
I had it replaced with 2019 model, which allowed for bolt-on installation of Nissin 4-pot calipers: the workshop that made the swap had a pair of used bandit calipers that fit and I bought them; didn't need to modify braided lines and banjos.

On a 2017 model you need adapters.
 

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Had to replace fork, it was bent due to an accident.
I had it replaced with 2019 model, which allowed for bolt-on installation of Nissin 4-pot calipers: the workshop that made the swap had a pair of used bandit calipers that fit and I bought them; didn't need to modify braided lines and banjos.

On a 2017 model you need adapters.
Gotcha, I figured as much, I was trying to see if you got adapters or new forks. Grazie di cuore!
 

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Hey Bennette
hans here from the FB SV650X group...

I've gone for a 2007 Kawasaki ZX10R rear shock
Straight bolt in pretty much except for the removal of a plastic sub-cover for the battery box for clearance.
However you need to be very specific which shock you get.
I have added a photo for reference, note the perpendicular reservoir, anything else will foul.

Anyway we can discuss it further in the SV650X group

or my FB page on my own SV650X upgrade


55211
 

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So I did all that stuff on my 17. And lots more. Worked wonders. Changed the bike. Highly recommended. I Love my SV now, and I didn't at first.

I used Traxxion Dynamics (top shelf folks) for the emulator/spring kit, K-tech for the rear shock, (probably the one you were looking at on Revz), SV racing parts for the brake lines and pads. (Nice guy, you can talk to him direct).

Whatever route you go, I definitely suggest that you do one thing at a time, and test each mod over time before moving on to the next. This will allow you to see what changes, and what still needs help. More importantly, It will educate you about your bike, and why it does the things it does. That is very useful data; don't ignore it.

And have fun. It's just ridin'.
 

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I used Traxxion Dynamics (top shelf folks) for the emulator/spring kit, K-tech for the rear shock, (probably the one you were looking at on Revz), SV racing parts for the brake lines and pads. (Nice guy, you can talk to him direct).
...
That's the route I'm thinking of going. The Traxxion Dynamics kit is very affordable and straightforward to install from what I saw. I liked the K-Tech rear shock a lot and looked very affordable as well for the features it offered. Traxxion also has a Penske 8975 rear shock for about the same price that seems good as well. This will all be my spring project next year as I plan to do some track days with the bike as well.
 

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That's the route I'm thinking of going. The Traxxion Dynamics kit is very affordable and straightforward to install from what I saw. I liked the K-Tech rear shock a lot and looked very affordable as well for the features it offered. Traxxion also has a Penske 8975 rear shock for about the same price that seems good as well. This will all be my spring project next year as I plan to do some track days with the bike as well.
That Penske looks like a nice shock. I'd definitely put it on your shortlist. The Holeshot guy has shocks too; might want to drop him a line and see what that's all about. You have Options...;-)
Regardless, I'd start with the forks first. If you go with TD, I think their newer kit is more of a one piece damper rod/valve as apposed to a separate emulator and rod (which is what i have). If you know how to do seals, you pretty much know how to do this. Only tricky part for me was getting the stock damper rod bolt to crack. Zuki torques that thing down hard and I needed a broomstick to keep the rod from spinning. That will all make sense when you are there.

Anyways, have fun. One of the most enjoyable parts of owning my SV has been upgrading it, and then feeling the upgrades work to improve the ride.
 
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